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The benefits of biologicals for food & health industries

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This joint EIT Food and EIT Health event was hosted at the
Koppert headquarters in the Netherlands. The main topic of the event was the benefits of biologicals for food & health industries: from pre-harvest to post-consumption.
Link to the event information: https://www.eitfood.eu/events/event/the-benefits-of-biologicals-for-food-health-industries/

The presentation includes:
Soil biodiversity
How to feed an astronaut - cooking in Space - Menu fatigue - Space farming
About Koppert Biological Systems - Sustainability, food, health - Pest and disease control - natural pollination - biological crop protection -

Published in: Food
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The benefits of biologicals for food & health industries

  1. 1. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet • Morbi massa lectus, semper eget ullamcorper at, egestas et felis. • Vestibulum id pharetra est. • Sed pharetra lacus eget orci efficitur, at ultrices dui rhoncus. • Mauris purus dui, aliquet eget accumsan id, sollicitudin eget tellus. • Sed rutrum porta efficitur. • Sed quis urna eu ipsum gravida condimentum ut in mi.
  2. 2. Partners with Nature Peter Jens, Director Strategic Alliances / CEO AND Biopharma BV. Thanks Irene and Jan!
  3. 3. THE LOGIC OF TODAYS EVENT
  4. 4. THE LOGIC OF TODAYS EVENT
  5. 5. “Help ensure that every body can enjoy a long, productive and dignified life… MY MISSION:
  6. 6. “Help ensure that every body can enjoy a long, productive and dignified life ….and dies healthily.” MY MISSION:
  7. 7. “Help ensure that every body can enjoy a long, productive and dignified life ….and dies healthy.” Director Strategic Alliances at Koppert Biological Systems Chief Executive Officer at AND Biopharma BV Responsible for Education and Innovation at Koppert Foundation Food & Knowledge Business Platform, Ministry of Foreign Affairs; PuraNatura Foundation; Urban Farmers AG MY MISSION:
  8. 8. Find out how the use of biologicals in the primary production will improve the lives and health of consumers, other than “absence of bad stuff” and towards “presence of good stuff”. TODAY’S MISSION:
  9. 9. TODAY’S MISSION:
  10. 10. TODAY’S MISSION:
  11. 11. TODAY’S MISSION:
  12. 12. TODAY’S MISSION:
  13. 13. TODAY’S MISSION:
  14. 14. TODAY’S MISSION:
  15. 15. Partners with Nature Martin Koppert, director Koppert Agri
  16. 16. Opening by EIT Health & EIT Food 14-06-2018 Menno Kok – 14 June 2018
  17. 17. Food for Health: Objectives • Develop a joint strategy and build a shared portfolio to better exploit the opportunities offered by the overarching area of food for health • Joining forces in Campus and Business Creation, especially in activities of a generic nature • Team up in development of sustainability plans
  18. 18. Opportunity: cross-KIC engaging EIT Health and EIT Food Campus: Citizen oriented activities Entrepreneurship education (Generic) Innovation training New teaching methods…. Accelerator: All activities: share succesful approaches* Create communicating vessels… Innovation: Exploit strength of both networks Use 2019 to establish common grounds and initiate shared innovation activities…. Leuven, September 26: Investor forum
  19. 19. Connecting high potential areas with an integrated innovation processes Challenge 1 Promote Healthy Living Challenge 2 Support Active Ageing Removing Barriers to Innovation Leveraging Talents & Education Leveraging Enabling Technologies and Exploiting Big Data Successful start-ups Economics growth Fast market access and diffusion of innovative products and services Globally competitive European industry Better quality of life Citizens enabled to take ownership of their health Empowered citizens to take choices for longer active and social life Improved patient pathways, cost- effectiveness, sustainability and quality of healthcare Stronger innovation eco- systems at CLCs and the EIT Health InnoStars A B C Challenge 3 Improve HealthCare Better trained personnel and new jobs
  20. 20. Start from innovation areas of common interest: Imaging technology Care pathways Reimbusement Food processing Crop yields Logistics Such as: Consumer behavior and a healthy diet Obesitas: Prevention strategies Role of food intake in clinically relevant situations Human health and the microbiome Biomarkers of a healthy GI tract Food composition: eliminating sugar, salt and saturation Allergy and hypersensitivity to food components Dietary consequences of ageing Food and wellbeing Food as a source of endocrine disrupters….. Cross-over technologies: (e.g. imaging and food quality)
  21. 21. Set-up a platform for common activities Make choice for “starter” based on: - Relevance to both KICs and KIC to KIC complementarity - Preferably a short cycle time - Evident business opportunities and partner(s) to exploit these - High impact and “starter nature” of 2019 activities 1. Consumer behavior and a healthy diet 2. Obesitas: prevention strategies 3. Role of food intake in clinically relevant situations 4. Human health and the microbiome 5. Biomarkers of a healthy GI tract 6. Food composition: eliminating sugar, salt and saturation 7. Allergy and hypersensitivity to food components 8. Dietary consequences of ageing 9. Food and wellbeing 10.Food as a source of endocrine disrupters…..
  22. 22. Foundation 2020 2019 2018 Build the foundation of a joint innovation strategy H F Select partners to project lines and develop these Operational fit Selected partners prepare the foundation Mechanism to build shared innovation portfolio
  23. 23. In 2018: • Prepare cross KIC project • Start building foundation for joint Innovation activities In 2019: • Call for partners to Innovation projects • Operational fit • Joint Campus and Accelerator activities • Integrate Food for Health into both business cycles
  24. 24. A KIC must be borne from a strong desire to do things differently, (..) experiment at the boundaries of innovation! www.eithealth.eu menno.kok@eithealth.eu
  25. 25. HOW TO FEED AN ASTRONAUT ANGELO VERMEULEN Greenport Hub TU Delft | IPStar | SEAD Cross-KIC of EIT Food and EIT Health Koppert Biological Systems, Berkel en Rodenrijs 14 June 2018
  26. 26. GREENPORT HUB Leiden + Delft + Erasmus Horticulture oriented 4 research tracks: • Digital innovation • Circular horticulture • Health and well-being • Internationalization
  27. 27. GREENPORT HUB Leiden + Delft + Erasmus Horticulture oriented 4 research tracks: • Digital innovation • Circular horticulture • Health and well-being • Internationalization
  28. 28. GREENPORT HUB We seek collaboration: • Strategic innovation program • Direct R&D • Research agenda
  29. 29. Space food, Project Mercury, NASA (1958-1963)
  30. 30. Space food, International Space Station
  31. 31. Space food, International Space Station
  32. 32. MENU FATIGUE PRESERVATION LIMITED SUPPLIES HEALTH
  33. 33. COOKING IN SPACE
  34. 34. HI-SEAS Mission I, Mauna Loa, Hawai'i, 2013
  35. 35. HI-SEAS Mission I, Mauna Loa, Hawai'i, 2013 Photos: Yajaira Sierra Sastre, Sian Proctor, Angelo
  36. 36. Food study, HI-SEAS Mission I, Mauna Loa, Hawai'i, 2013 Photos: Sian Proctor
  37. 37. Food study, HI-SEAS Mission I, Mauna Loa, Hawai'i, 2013
  38. 38. Photos: Sian Proctor Food study, HI-SEAS Mission I, Mauna Loa, Hawai'i, 2013
  39. 39. APPRECIATION COMMUNICATION CREATIVITY SHARING
  40. 40. “So far the three of us have had one meal per day together, and are settling into a comfortable conversational mode, talking a little about the day, joking about what we’re doing at the moment.” ― NASA astronaut diary “The original Space Station took out the table because nothing stays on it anyway. But at a certain point, the astronauts said, ‘Bring back the table. Put some straps on it. We want to sit around a table at the end of the day and eat like humans.’” ― Mary Roach, author of Packing for Mars
  41. 41. 3D FOOD PRINTING
  42. 42. MEAL VARIETY SHELF-STABLE INGREDIENTS CUSTOMIZED CONTENT TIME-EFFICIENT
  43. 43. PROCESSED INGREDIENTS VITAMIN LOSS LIMITED TEXTURES
  44. 44. SPACE FARMING
  45. 45. Sprout research (with Simon Engler), HI-SEAS Mission I, Mauna Loa, Hawai’i, 2013
  46. 46. ANTIMICROBIAL TEXTILE CONTROL Sprout research (with Yajaira Sierra Sastre), HI-SEAS Mission I, Mauna Loa, Hawai’i, 2013
  47. 47. Sprout research (with Yajaira Sierra Sastre), HI-SEAS Mission I, Mauna Loa, Hawai’i, 2013 ANTIMICROBIAL TEXTILE CONTROL
  48. 48. “High-phenolic antioxidant-containing sprouts with no microbial load were developed by elicitation with low dose phenolic antimicrobials and a two-step, short-pulse microwave-induced heating step.” ― Kalidas Shetty et al., SAE Technical Papers, July 2003
  49. 49. Closed loop ecosystem, Biosphere 2, Arizona, 1991-1994
  50. 50. CLOSING THE LOOP MATHEMATICAL MODELING IMPACT SPACE ENVIRONMENT GENETIC DRIFT
  51. 51. FOOD CULTURE SELF-RELIANCE COMFORT FOODS EVOLUTION
  52. 52. CONTACT Angelo Vermeulen A.C.J.Vermeulen@tudelft.nl COLLABORATION WITH GREENPORT HUB Liselotte de Vries Liselotte.deVries@tudelft.nl
  53. 53. Peter Maes Director Corporate Marketing
  54. 54. INTRODUCTION KOPPERT BIOLOGICAL SYSTEMS ▪ Founded in 1967 ▪ Market leader and the a truly “global” and “pure” biocontrol company (thought leader) ▪ 1500 employees worldwide ▪ Family company Koppert started with a beneficial mite to combat spider mite infestation. Nowadays a more holistic biological approach is used in both horticulture and agriculture.
  55. 55. HISTORY Back in 1967, Jan Koppert was a dedicated cucumber grower. Diseases and pests were controlled with chemicals but the efficacy of this method decreased each year. Jan Koppert became allergic and ill as a result of these products. He had to look for alternatives and immersed himself in the world of natural enemies. He was the first to introduce a natural enemy to combat spider mite infestation. The results and effects were so positive that Jan Koppert decided to produce this solution. He had to face a fundamental choice
  56. 56. MISSION STATEMENT (2014) Koppert Biological Systems contributes to the better health of people and the planet. In partnership with nature, we make agriculture healthier, safer and more productive. We provide an integrated system of specialist knowledge and natural, safe solutions that improves crop health, resilience and production. Koppert Biological Systems Partners with Nature
  57. 57. TRENDS THE WORLD IS CHANGING ▪ Preserving biodiversity ▪ Reducing CO² ▪ Soil depletion/ water quality ▪ Sustainable intensification ▪ Food safety/security ▪ 10 billion 2050/70% city (1111- 1333) ▪ Economics ▪ Social/Politics
  58. 58. TRENDS ▪ The Market (consumer) demands residue-poor or even residue-free products ▪ Retailers and supermarket impose extra-legal requirements on farmers ▪ More attention for work safety ▪ Society and Legislator want less impact on the environment and public health ▪ Sustainable production: more production with less input and less impact ▪ Certification and trust ▪ Circular economy
  59. 59. KEY DRIVERS Key drivers for implementing Biological solutions ▪ Pesticide resistance ▪ Residu management ( license to supply) re-entry time ▪ Organic production ▪ Environment and health ▪ Productivity and Quality. Influence of pesticides and fertilizers
  60. 60. MicrobialsPollination WHAT DO WE DO? SUSTAINABILITY-FOOD-HEALTH Macrobials
  61. 61. CORE DISCIPLINES KOPPERT’S CORE DISCIPLINES: ▪ Research and development ▪ Worldwide production and distribution of solutions – Resilient Growth with NatuGro – Biological Pest Control – Natural Pollination – Application techniques & monitoring – Seed treatment – Livestock (BSF) ▪ Know-how and knowledge sharing
  62. 62. PEST AND DISEASE CONTROL KOPPERT’S PEST MANAGEMENT SOLUTIONS ▪ Widely used throughout the horticultural industry, and starting in agricultural industry ▪ Dramatically reducing the use of agro-chemicals over the years ▪ The greatest impact has been in tomato cultivation ▪ The use of crop protection chemicals has been decreased upto 95% ▪ (beneficials and biopesticides)
  63. 63. NATURAL POLLINATION 1/2 WHY POLLINATION BY NATUPOL? ▪ Pollination results in considerably higher yield through better fruit setting ▪ Under many conditions bumblebees are more effective pollinators than honeybees ▪ Improves the quality and shelf life of both seeds and fruit ▪ Reduced labour costs for the grower
  64. 64. RESILIENT GROWTH WITH NATUGRO NATUGRO, NATURAL GROWING A SYSTEM THAT CONSISTS OF: ▪ Beneficial micro-organisms – Fungi – Bacteria ▪ Biostimulants – Amino- acids – Alga – Botanicals ▪ Analysis ▪ Professional advice
  65. 65. KOPPERT AT/SERVICE – SOFTWARE Koppert SmartScout App ▪ Digital database for collecting data from all different sources, e.g. Remote Sensing, UAV Sensing, soil life sensors etc. (input from external – Koppert’s output) - pest and disease detection -soil life monitoring ▪ Analyzing data by Koppert’s models – DSS (Decision Support Systems) ▪ Scouting and monitoring pests and diseases by smart phone
  66. 66. CROP PROTECTION & PRODUCTIVITY (YIELD IMPROVEMENT) ▪ Increased production when intensive use of chemical pesticides is stopped. ▪ Plant growth promoting (PGP) effect of micro-organisms ▪ Reduction of use of chemical fertilizers by applying micro-organisms and biostimulants ▪ Protection against abiotic stress by using micro-organisms. ▪ IPM+INM+ITM= ICM ( yield increase starting with seed)
  67. 67. WHAT IS BIOLOGICAL CROP PROTECTION FOR KOPPERT? TOTAL PLANT VITALITY . Advice Pollination Biological control Healthy soil life
  68. 68. THANK YOU FOR YOUR INTEREST! CONTACT: Koppert B.V. The Netherlands Phone: +31 (0)10 5140444 info@koppert.com CLOSING AND QUESTIONS?
  69. 69. By Menno Kok June 14, 2018 EIT Health: the challenges of prevention
  70. 70. Connecting high potential areas with an integrated innovation processes Challenge 1 Promote Healthy Living Challenge 2 Support Active Ageing Removing Barriers to Innovation Leveraging Talents & Education Leveraging Enabling Technologies and Exploiting Big Data Successful start-ups Economics growth Fast market access and diffusion of innovative products and services Globally competitive European industry Better quality of life Citizens enabled to take ownership of their health Empowered citizens to take choices for longer active and social life Improved patient pathways, cost- effectiveness, sustainability and quality of healthcare Stronger innovation eco- systems at CLCs and the EIT Health InnoStars A B C Challenge 3 Improve HealthCare Better trained personnel and new jobs
  71. 71. Prevention or intervention?
  72. 72. The major challenge may well be in finding new ways to influence behavior and lifestyle.
  73. 73. “Are we allowed to have some fun?” Some of the innovation hurdles: Who pays and who collects? Willingness to pay Evidence based care User comfort: consumer centered design and plug & play Standardisation Acceptation of (new) technology: consumer (market-) pull Privacy, safety Standardisation Standardisation
  74. 74. Its about making choices…….
  75. 75. more choices…….
  76. 76. And its about realism! Obesitas and diabetes in some European countries (2014)
  77. 77. Empirical (genetic) data changes the way individuals perceive themselves and their families, and change the way others see them (Taylor, 2008) The participative perspective (Hood & Friend, 2011) Self management: personalized health shifts the responsibility for good health from government and collectives to the individual, who becomes responsible for his/her own health or disease (Savond, 2013) Personalised Medicine and Personalised Health
  78. 78. Inclusive innovation: European citizen 2.0 Inclusive innovation: fostering health, performance and engagement of the European citizen. Building on: social capital in European countries and regions
  79. 79. Traffic accidents(NL) 1970: 3181 deaths in traffic There are good examples... Numbers not normalised for the number of vehicles
  80. 80. Omni-approachable for the professional, interactive, standardized, useful for the empowered citizen, safe, accepted, open to scientific approaches,…. Health care provider Self management
  81. 81. Smooth introduction of technology Information Coaching Telemedicine
  82. 82. New approches to lifestyle interventions • Involve the citizen • Distribute responsibilities (self-management) • Make it affordable (payment models) • Facilitate access to tools (data) • Capitalize on human resources • Provide support • Make it attractive and provide evidence • Start now and... • Stick to your plan
  83. 83. Performance with purpose By Imran Afzal (PepsiCo) VISIT THE WEBSITE HERE
  84. 84. The next generation of growing ……… The next generation of ultra nutritious fresh food ……. Ard Reijtenbagh Chief Partnership Officer
  85. 85. Increasing Nutritional Values of crops through Fully Controlled Growing Environments
  86. 86. The next generation of growing Unlock crops’ full potential in a fully controlled environment offering a new window of opportunities
  87. 87. About PlantLab, who we are … • Since early ’90ties, prototype 2005, incorporated in 2010 • The Netherlands, ‘s-Hertogenbosch (+ office in USA) • Multidisciplinary company: • Plant Science • Technology • Production • Supply chain • Marketing & Food design
  88. 88. About PlantLab, what we do …… • Develop plant growth recipes • Develop integrated technology solution (hard- & software) • Build and operate indoor vertical farms → production • Partnerships
  89. 89. Plant ParadisePlant Paradise 3%
  90. 90. ’90ties: nature = mathematics Light CO2 Water Nutrients Leaves Maintenance Sinks Speed
  91. 91. Plant Paradise®
  92. 92. Wide variety of crops
  93. 93. Global challenges & Indoor farming Food security Sustainability Indoor farming Anywhere Footprint Food waste Recycling No chemicals Water use CO2 Foot print
  94. 94. Plant ID Plant Paradise
  95. 95. Growing recipes – tailor made
  96. 96. Steering levels of compounds → taste & nutrition
  97. 97. Basil PPU vs Greenhouse 0 1000 2000 3000 4000 5000 Rosie A1 Rosie A2 Rosie A3 Rosie Control 1 Rosie Control 2 Rosie Control 3 Rosie Control 4 Geraniol 0 50000 100000 150000 Rosie A1 Rosie A2 Rosie A3 Rosie Control 1 Rosie Control 2 Rosie Control 3 Rosie Control 4 Linalool 0 2000 4000 6000 Rosie A1 Rosie A2 Rosie A3 Rosie Control 1 Rosie Control 2 Rosie Control 3 Rosie Control 4 Eugenol
  98. 98. Typical values 100 grams contains A typical serving Energy 60 kJ (14kCal) 48kJ (11kCal) Protein 0,7g 0,6g Carbohydrate 1,9g 1,5g Sugars 1,9 1,5g Fat 0,3g 0,2g Saturates <0,1g <0,1g Fibre 0,6g 0,5g Salt 0,0g 0,0g Iceberg lettuce Romaine lettuce Nutritional value
  99. 99. (Developing) work in progress
  100. 100. Plant ParadisePlant Paradise Fresh & healthy food is top of mind
  101. 101. Plant Paradise Personalized fresh food Functional fresh food Food = Medicine
  102. 102. Thank You
  103. 103. Lunch break Next session: 13h
  104. 104. How ecological thinking can improve agro- food- and pharma-systems On the potential applications of controlling harmful species by their extracellular self-DNA Prof. Stefano Mazzoleni Laboratory of Applied Ecology and System Dynamics Modelling Dept. Agricultural Sciences – University of Napoli Federico II www.ecoap.unina.it European Institute of Innovation & Technology (EIT) Food Cross-KIC event with EIT Health Rotterdam 14 June 2018
  105. 105. Background ideas from ecology
  106. 106. Why plants in arid environments form rings?
  107. 107. Bonanomi et al. 2005. Plant Ecology Scirpus holoschoenus
  108. 108. Plant-soil negative feedback CENTRAL DIE-BACK Other species establishment
  109. 109. Negative plant-soil feedback and tropical forest diversity Mangan et al. 2010, Nature
  110. 110. 131 Why seedlings die under their mother plant? ? … and why other species do not?
  111. 111. Direction of tussock spread Living tillers A) Living fine roots Direction of tussock spread Living tillers Dead tillers, rhizomes and roots B) Living fine roots
  112. 112. β=2.5 t = 10 t = 25 t = 50 β=5β=10 y xxx y y Simulation results time toxicityeffect Modelling ring forming plants Journal of Theoretical Biology 2012
  113. 113. Simulation results tim e toxicity effect Modelling ring forming plants Journal of Theoretical Biology 2012
  114. 114. Nutrient cycling PROBLEM
  115. 115. Grasses - Sedges Forbs N - Fixing Woody SpeciesVegetation type Plant material Decomposition (5) Junkus effusus L. Leaf - Root Aerobic / Anaerobic (2) Carex distachya Desf. Leaf - Root Aerobic (7) Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin. Leaf - Root Aerobic / Anaerobic (4) Festuca drymeia M. et K. Leaf Aerobic / Anaerobic / Litterbag (8) Coronilla emerus L. Leaf Aerobic / Anaerobic / Litterbag (13) Cistus monspeliensis L. Leaf Aerobic / Anaerobic (12) Cistus incanus L. Leaf Aerobic (16) Quercus ilex L. Leaf Aerobic / Anaerobic / Litterbag (25) Typha latifolia L. Leaf - Root Aerobic / Anaerobic (19) Hedera helix L. Leaf Aerobic / Anaerobic / Litterbag (6) Phleum subulatum (Savi) Asch et Gr. Leaf Aerobic (1) Ammophila littoralis (Beauv.) Rothm. Leaf Aerobic (3) Dactylis hispanica Roth Leaf - Root Aerobic (9) Medicago marina L. Leaf Aerobic (10) Medicago minima L. Leaf - Root Aerobic (11) Melilotus neapolitana Ten. Leaf - Root Aerobic (17) Rosmarinus officinalis L. Leaf Aerobic (15) Pinus pinea L. Leaf Aerobic (14) Fraxinus ornus L. Leaf Aerobic (23) Teucrium chamaedrys L. Leaf - Root Aerobic (24) Teucrium polium L. Leaf - Root Aerobic (21) Petrorhagia saxifraga L. Leaf - Root Aerobic (22) Petrorhagia velutina Guss Leaf - Root Aerobic (20) Lobularia maritima L. Leaf - Root Aerobic (18) Bellis perennis L. Leaf - Root Aerobic Functional group Wetland Grassland Wetland Woodland Grassland Mobile sand dune Grassland Woodland Mobile sand dune Grassland Grassland Shrubland Shrubland Woodland Shrubland Woodland Woodland Wetland Woodland Grassland Grassland Grassland Grassland Grassland Grassland Bonanomi et al. (2005)
  116. 116. AC + AC - Control Quercus ilex 0Decomposition days 120 0 120 Heterospecific ConspecificLITTER Toxicity experiment
  117. 117. 1H NMR
  118. 118. Nutrient cycling Model idea Inhibitory effect by extracellular SELF-DNA
  119. 119. DNA concentration Fresh litter Decomposed litter Agarose gel
  120. 120. 13C CPMAS NMR DNA!
  121. 121. DNA release by litter decomposition and root turnover extracellular DNA degradation interactions with minerals and organic matter uptake Enhance pathogen attack inhibit root functionality inhibit cell functionality Inhibitory effect of extracellular SELF-DNA as mechanism of NF
  122. 122. 149 Jantzen-Connel distribution of seedlings is explained
  123. 123. Discovery (1) > 30 plant species Results published in: New Phytologist 2015 a + Heterologous DNA + Self DNA
  124. 124. Inhibitory effect not only for plants: it is a general biological phenomenon! Discovery (2) Results published in: New Phytologist 2015 b + SELF-DNA
  125. 125. Inhibitory effect not only for plants: it is a general biological phenomenon! Discovery (2) Results published in: New Phytologist 2015 b + SELF-DNA X Animalia: Sarchophaga carnaria + SELF-DNA+ Heterologous DNA
  126. 126. Innovative concept Harmful organisms can be controlled by the exposure to their own DNA
  127. 127. Spodoptora Plodia Soil nematodes Varroa Snails Weeds AGRO applications
  128. 128. DNA extraction Specific nematode inhibitor Synthetic pesticide ( ( Pesticide application Self-DNA application PARASITE/PATHOGEN ATTACK Imagine if: NEW SCENARIO FOR BIOCONTROL Traditional approach
  129. 129. Synthetic herbicide DNA extraction Specific weed inhibitor ( ( WEEDS INFESTATION
  130. 130. Pharma applications
  131. 131. 15years(averageresearchtime) • Random screening long and expensive • Low or No specificity of action • Toxicity for humans • Environmental contamination • Pathogen resistance problem Problems! Traditional phytochemical and pharmaceutical approach
  132. 132. 15years(averageresearchtime) NEW NOSELF METHOD 1year DNA extraction TARGET BIOLOGICAL SYSTEM DNA fragmentation Traditional phytochemical and pharmaceutical approach • No random screening • High specificity of action • No toxicity for humans • No environmental contamination • No pathogen resistance problem Imagine if:
  133. 133. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS Traditional approach No Self Technology High ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTION None High ONSET OF RESISTANCE None Low SPECIFICITY OF ACTION Maximal High HUMAN HEALTH HAZARD None High R&D COSTS Low Years R&D DURATION Months
  134. 134. controlling harmful species in agriculture with their own DNA as nature does AND Biopharma :)
  135. 135. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet • Morbi massa lectus, semper eget ullamcorper at, egestas et felis. • Vestibulum id pharetra est. • Sed pharetra lacus eget orci efficitur, at ultrices dui rhoncus. • Mauris purus dui, aliquet eget accumsan id, sollicitudin eget tellus. • Sed rutrum porta efficitur. • Sed quis urna eu ipsum gravida condimentum ut in mi.

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