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Incre as e you r R E S U M E / V                               C               Valu e             Th rou gh         E F F ...
Know your valueBreaking down value bullets!V = idea, process, service, or task one created, managed,or supported, through ...
Value Adds    Level of Influence                        Name Recognition   # of managers                            Name...
Understanding and presentprocess knowledge   Quantify - engineering process objectives.   Estimate - impacts we can expe...
10 Processes Principles1.   Processes are ‘good’ if satisfy the organizational objectives.3.   Usefulness for process decl...
10 Processes Principles (cont.) 6. Malpractice possible if process doesn’t meet estimated levels of     efficiency. 7. Pro...
Organizational Objectives to Measure Your Deliverables   Time to Market   Predictability of Time to Market   Lead Time...
Time to Market Scale: Time from Product Concept Approval to availabilityon defined [Market] Predictability of Time To Mark...
Lead Time Scale: Months from TG0, to first use for major workstation package.Scale: Average Time from defined [Inception P...
ProductivityScale: Net Profit per financial year derived from  defined [New Products or Services]
Quality Levels Scale: Percentage (%) +/- deviation from defined  [Agreed Quality Attributes].
Process TransportabilityScale: The cost as a percentage (%) of affected  persons Gross Annual Cost, for successfully  lea...
Competitiveness Scale: Average percentage (%) impact on a defined  set of [Competitiveness Measures] within a  year from ...
Risk Controllability Scale: The percentage (%) probability that defined  [Project or Product Requirements] can be  delive...
Prioritization Ability Scale: The average speed in Days that a new  [Priority Item] can be effectively acted upon.
Customer Satisfaction Scale: Average survey result on a scale of 1 to 6  (best).
Table 1: Example - client’s initial draft setting objectives thatengineering processes must meet. Rt side table shows obje...
When organizational objectives change, or are satisfied byother means, the usefulness of a process may decline ordisappear...
If Processes equivalent =      performance    Distinguished by:    Use of the limited, budgeted resources (ex. human resou...
Can estimate the efficiency (value to cost ratio) of process based on      experience, or similar processes; but can’t be ...
Quantify/MetricsYour contributions into business specific results… Clearly state your performance relative to key function...
More MetricsOrganization/Team                      Program Management  Actual staffing (hours or             Product Uni...
Product   Unit production cost / target cost.   Labor hours or labor hours / target labor    hours.   Material cost or ...
Technology    Percent team members with full access to product    data and product models.    CAD workstation ratio (CAD ...
6 Sigma   Six Sigma implementation involves the followingSEVEN phases:  1. DEFINE the processes that contribute to the pro...
6 Sigma Metrics   Defects Per Million Opportunities (DPMO): is the number of critical defects     that the process is est...
Six Sigma Initiatives: Focus                    Business & Value Impact Your Strengths and     Ask: How did my work  Deve...
Six Sigma Initiatives (Cont.)Context                      Quantifiable accomplishments or  Was the task complex         m...
Harvard Review - GEs    “Growth Values”    External Focus: “Defines success through the customers eyes. In tune with indu...
Behavioral Values CURIOUS                                                                    TEAMWORK  Generates new and ...
Action Verbs for Resume   Accomplished, Finalized, Processed, Succeeded   Achieved, Founded, Produced, Superseded       ...
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INCREASE YOUR RESUME / CV VALUE THROUGH PERFORMANCE METRICS

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INCREASE YOUR RESUME / CV VALUE THROUGH PERFORMANCE METRICS

  1. 1. Incre as e you r R E S U M E / V C Valu e Th rou gh E F F E C IE N C Y& P E R FO R M AN C E M E TR IC S B y Nayeem C howdhury
  2. 2. Know your valueBreaking down value bullets!V = idea, process, service, or task one created, managed,or supported, through technical, interpersonal tools whichimproved organizational value and performance. 1. Reduced project cycle time (# of mnths / days / yrs) 2. Saved $$ 3. Made $$ 4. Maintained business 5. Created Business 
  3. 3. Value Adds Level of Influence Name Recognition # of managers  Name & numeric value of project  # of students in academic project working on: ex. $200 MM BP North Sea Drilling Project, $5 million dollar grant # clients project with University of Texas, Austin, # (internal/external) customer  Petroleum Engineering Department, groups research study for collaboration with # projects you either supported or  Chevron. managed.  Name of clients or customers you  Technical Tools & Training for  worked with (Organizations/University)  Success: you worked with: ex. Exxon, Shell, BP, Information technologies: used and  Bechtel, Citi Group some how improved a process Ex. Primavera, Ansys, Hysis,  Were you a big fish in a small pond, or small fish in a big pond – Group or QuickBooks SAP, Oracle, MS access, company size. excel, Orcaflex, AutoCad, Pipesim, PRO E, Solidworks, AB, Wonderware Status: if Green Card holder / US  Citizen, make on the header of resume.
  4. 4. Understanding and presentprocess knowledge Quantify - engineering process objectives. Estimate - impacts we can expect from new and changed  engineering processes. Measure - in practice the impact of new processes. Identify - good or bad processes, based on results your  previous projects.
  5. 5. 10 Processes Principles1. Processes are ‘good’ if satisfy the organizational objectives.3. Usefulness for process decline or disappear when org objectives  change or are satisfied by other means.5. Processes equivalent in performance effects can be distinguished  by use of the limited, budgeted resources (for example, human  resources, financial costs and time).7. Process efficiency estimated by (value to cost ratio) of process  based on experience with it, or similar processes; no certainty of  process impacts until measured within organization.9. Because process measured efficient once doesn’t will not always  change for better or worse over time in different scenarios.
  6. 6. 10 Processes Principles (cont.) 6. Malpractice possible if process doesn’t meet estimated levels of  efficiency. 7. Processes should be implemented early in small steps and their effect  measured before scaling up. 8. Process impacts always be on multiple critical organizational  performance and cost characteristics; must not evaluate in a single  dimension alone.  9. Justification of process should rationally be efficient effects on  organizational objectives. Process never can be mandated as ‘best  practice’, should forever be monitored for its justification.  10. Before implementation of new process, the resources to implement and  maintain should be created by conscious and specific removal of less  efficient processes that it will replace.
  7. 7. Organizational Objectives to Measure Your Deliverables Time to Market Predictability of Time to Market Lead Time Productivity Quality Levels Transportability (Outsource ability) Competitiveness Risk Avoid ability/Controllability Prioritization Ability Customer Satisfaction
  8. 8. Time to Market Scale: Time from Product Concept Approval to availabilityon defined [Market] Predictability of Time To Market:  Scale: Percentage (%) overrun of actual Project Time compared to  planned Project Time.  Project Time: Defined: Time from the date that Toll Gate 0 (TG0) passed,  or other defined [Start Event] to the Planned- or Actually- delivered Date  of all Specified Requirements.   Specified Requirements: Defined: Written approved quality requirements  for products with respect to planned and constraint levels with qualifiers  [when, where, conditions]. And, other function, resource and design  requirements.  Meter: The Productivity Project or Process Owner will collect numeric  data, concerning the required levels on this Scale, from all projects, or  make appropriate estimates, and put them in the Productivity Database.
  9. 9. Lead Time Scale: Months from TG0, to first use for major workstation package.Scale: Average Time from defined [Inception Point] until defined [Delivery Point].
  10. 10. ProductivityScale: Net Profit per financial year derived from defined [New Products or Services]
  11. 11. Quality Levels Scale: Percentage (%) +/- deviation from defined [Agreed Quality Attributes].
  12. 12. Process TransportabilityScale: The cost as a percentage (%) of affected persons Gross Annual Cost, for successfully learning to deploy a defined [Process] to a defined [Capability Level].
  13. 13. Competitiveness Scale: Average percentage (%) impact on a defined set of [Competitiveness Measures] within a year from First Deployment in a defined [Organization].
  14. 14. Risk Controllability Scale: The percentage (%) probability that defined [Project or Product Requirements] can be delivered within defined [Percentage of Target Levels] under conditions of defined [Risks].
  15. 15. Prioritization Ability Scale: The average speed in Days that a new [Priority Item] can be effectively acted upon.
  16. 16. Customer Satisfaction Scale: Average survey result on a scale of 1 to 6 (best).
  17. 17. Table 1: Example - client’s initial draft setting objectives thatengineering processes must meet. Rt side table shows objectives related to defined senior management financial planning
  18. 18. When organizational objectives change, or are satisfied byother means, the usefulness of a process may decline ordisappear. Organizational objectives (called business objectives in the tables):• Subject to pressures demand constant tuning, updating and even radical change  ASAP. • Simple enough to change target number and due dates in a set of objectives.• Stopping process change ‘ship in mid Atlantic’ is another problem. • Major investments in contracts and training may have been set in motion, which  may of become obsolete.Arguments for implementing processes considerations: Highest value-to-cost processes first, which measures a notion of ROI (Return On  Investment) Highest risk-of-obsolescence processes last Understand the volatility of the objectives target levels to determine that risk. Large and costly processes need to be decomposed into smaller, early implementations, and high-value low-volatility sub-processes need to be  prioritized. 
  19. 19. If Processes equivalent =  performance Distinguished by: Use of the limited, budgeted resources (ex. human resources, financial costs  and time). Primary consideration for a process is ability to help reach target  levels.  Interested in its contribution to achieving goal and stretch levels for  the business objectives (see Table 1).  If target not reached does not matter how cheap it is.  Second consideration is that the costs for all types of resources are  within budgets, or profitability limitations. In addition, a single process should not steal resources from more  profitable processes.  Decisions about what to spend on process implementation cannot  be made in isolation from all the other processes that use  concurrent resources. The Impact Estimation table helps us get a  view of all of these considerations.
  20. 20. Can estimate the efficiency (value to cost ratio) of process based on experience, or similar processes; but can’t be certain process impacts until measuring them in place within organization.  Estimations are guesses, and we know they are not for sure.  Consequently we cannot bind ourselves (in contracts, and corporate plans) to full implementation of a particular process until it is proven to deliver to expectations in practice.  This requires evolutionary implementation, for example on a project-by- project basis, or even in small groups within larger projects.  If the estimates are validated by practical experience, we can ramp up.  Otherwise we may have to drop the new engineering process, replace it with another or tune it to work properly.
  21. 21. Quantify/MetricsYour contributions into business specific results… Clearly state your performance relative to key functional metrics. Mechanical Design Product Assurance  # of in-process design changes /  Actual MTBF / predicted # of parts. MTBF.  # of design review deficiencies / #  % of build-to-packages parts. released without errors.  # of drafting errors / number of  % of testable requirements. sheets or # of print changes / total  Process capability (Cp / Cpk). print features.  Product yield.  Drawing growth (unplanned  Field failure rate. drawings / total planned  Design review cycle time. drawings).  Open action items.  Producibility rating or assembly  System availability. efficiency  # of prototype iterations.  % of parts with no engineering  % Percent of parts modeled in change orders. solids.
  22. 22. More MetricsOrganization/Team  Program Management Actual staffing (hours or   Product Unit production $ / target $. headcount) vs. plan.  # Labor hours or labor hours / # target  Personnel turnover rate. labor hours. % of milestone dates met.  Material $ / Target material $. Schedule performance.  Product performance or product  Personnel ratios. performance / target product  Cost performance. performance or technical performance measures (e.g., power  Milestone or task completion vs.  output, mileage, weight, power  plan. consumption, mileage, range, payload,  On-schedule task start rate. sensitivity, noise, CPU frequency, etc.). Phase cycle time vs. plan.  Mean time between failures (MTBF). Time-to-market or time-to-volume.  Mean time to repair (MTTR).  System availability.
  23. 23. Product Unit production cost / target cost. Labor hours or labor hours / target labor hours. Material cost or material cost / target material cost.  Product ship date vs. announced ship date Product performance or product or planned ship date. performance / target product performance  Product general availability (GA) date vs. or technical announced GA date or planned GA date % performance measures (e.g., power output, of parts or part characteristics mileage, weight, power consumption, analyzed/simulated. mileage, range, payload, sensitivity, noise,  Net present value of cash outflows for CPU frequency, etc.). development and commercialization and the Mean time between failures (MTBF). inflows from sales. Mean time to repair (MTTR).  Breakeven time. System availability.  Expected commercial value (This equals Number of parts or number of parts / the net present value of product cash flows number of parts for last generation product. multiplied by the probability of commercial success minus the commercialization Defects per million opportunities or per unit. cost). Production yield.  This is multiplied by the probability of Field failure rates or failure rates per unit of technical success minus the development time or hours of operation. costs)  Percent of parts that can be recycled. Engineering changes after release by time  Percent of parts used in multiple products. period.  Average number of components per Design/build/test iterations. product. Production ramp-up time (example).
  24. 24. Technology  Percent team members with full access to product data and product models. CAD workstation ratio (CAD workstations / number of team members). Analysis/simulation intensity (analysis/simulation runs per model). Percent of team members with video- conferencing/desktop collaboration access/tools.
  25. 25. 6 Sigma  Six Sigma implementation involves the followingSEVEN phases: 1. DEFINE the processes that contribute to the problem. 2. MEASURE the capability of critical processes. 3. ANALYSE the data. 4. IMPROVE the key product / service characteristics. 5. CONTROL the key process variables. 6. STANDARDISE the methods for best-in-class process performance. 7. INTEGRATE the standard methods and processes with the product / service design stage. Six Sigma is a business initiative first introduced by Motorola in early 1990s. The Six Sigma strategy involves extensive use of statistical techniques such as control charts, design of experiments, response surface methodology etc. in order to minimize process variations and product / service defects. These techniques need to be applied in a structured manner.
  26. 26. 6 Sigma Metrics Defects Per Million Opportunities (DPMO): is the number of critical defects  that the process is estimated to generate per million opportunities  (operations or steps).  Defects Per Million Opportunities (DPMO): In shop-floor process control,  this is also called defective Parts Per Million (PPM) pieces produced by a  single process / operation. Based on the quality characteristic under study  (variable / attribute data type), one or more metrics may be used for  process monitoring and reporting. Sigma Quality Level and Yield: an indicator of process centering, and,  process variation viz-a-viz technical tolerance. A process at Six sigma  quality level is expected to generate only 3.4 defective Parts Per Million.  Yield is the estimated percentage of defect-free items (probability of zero  defects) churned out by a process. SPC: Sustaining and improving the process performance require process  monitoring and control schemes. It may be noted that the six sigma  metrics are just the indicators of process quality. such as Statistical  Process Control (), Engineering Process Control (EPC) etc.
  27. 27. Six Sigma Initiatives: Focus  Business & Value Impact Your Strengths and Ask: How did my work Development Needs impact the business? on.  Did I win a new Corporate Values & customer or resolve a customer satisfaction Corresponding problem? Actions.  Did I save time, money, Leadership Traits. or resources? Other important  Did I mentor or coach a initiatives (ex: Six fellow employee? Sigma).  Did I improve productivity?
  28. 28. Six Sigma Initiatives (Cont.)Context Quantifiable accomplishments or  Was the task complex missed deliverables  Tasks performed and metrics  Was the task critical to that quantify the results  the business? (percentages, time, money,  What barriers or etc.).  Degree to which the  obstacles did you have accomplishment exceeded,  to overcome? met or missed your goals. Did you receive any  Any circumstance that made  achieving the result  special recognition for challenging. the project?  Skills utilized and  competencies aiding success.  Direct effect on your  individual business unit.  How you have demonstrated  the your corporations values  and leadership traits.
  29. 29. Harvard Review - GEs “Growth Values”  External Focus: “Defines success through the customers eyes. In tune with industry dynamic. Sees around corners.” FA translation: Know how your clients truly define a successful financial advisor relationship. “Seeing around corners” requires that you interpret industry events in a way that will help you predict future developments. Clear Thinking: “Seeks simple solutions to complex problems. Is decisive and focused. Communicates clear and consistent priorities.” FA translation: Understand your affluent clients concerns and problems and provide clear, easy-to- understand solutions. All of your marketing efforts should focus on acquiring the ideal client. Make sure your clients know they are your “number one.” Imagination: “Generates new and creative ideas. Is resourceful and open to change. Takes risks on both people and ideas. Displays courage and tenacity.” FA translation: You need to think of new ways to create tangible value for clients. That may mean developing a new service model. Look at what your competitors are doing and take it one step further. Look for solutions that are outside your comfort zone. Inclusiveness: “Is a team player. Respects others ideas and contributions. Creates excitement, drives engagement, builds loyalty and commitment.” FA translation: Treat everyone you work with as a knowledge worker. Use their expertise. For example, even if you share an assistant with another advisor, you must consider this person a part of your team. Their ideas and contributions should be encouraged and ultimately required. Communication with support personnel and junior advisors must be clear and ongoing. Delegate responsibilities, not just tasks, and take the time to teach subordinates new things and build their expertise whenever possible. Expertise: “Has in-depth domain knowledge and credibility built on experience. Continuously develops self. Loves learning.” FA translation: Developing a deeper understanding of demographics, industry changes, political developments, consumer trends, and current affluent needs and wants will give you greater credibility with your clients and subordinates. Cultivating greater knowledge of yourself and engaging in physical exercise are also crucial to your ability to overcome future challenges. Commit to lifelong learning. You can start by reading one non-fiction book a month throughout 2009.
  30. 30. Behavioral Values CURIOUS TEAMWORK Generates new and creative ideas.  Builds trust by respecting the ideas and contributions of Fosters an environment where questions and ideas are valued. everyone. Seeks feedback, continuously learns, and develops self.  Works well with others. Learns as much or more from failures as successes.  Coaches and encourages others on a regular basis.   Contributes to positive morale and spirit within the team.PASSIONATE  Embraces diverse and global cultures. Demonstrates enthusiasm for what he/she does. Willing to take risks. COMMITTED Empowers others to question the status quo.  Sets clear and measurable goals. Creates excitement and inspires others to deliver.  Stays focused on business priorities.  Willing to make tough decisions and live with theRESOURCEFUL consequences. Seeks simple solutions to complex problems  Displays persistence and tenacity; is not deterred by Considers varied alternatives before selecting a solution. obstacles. Effectively uses internal/external network. Consistently gets tasks accomplished with available resources. OPEN  Attentive and respectful when listening and respondingACCOUNTABLE to others. Takes responsibility for decisions, actions and results.  Willing to change based on the inputs of others. Delivers on commitments to stakeholders.  Communicates in an open, candid, and consistent manner. Does what is best for the team and the customer.  Accessible and approachable. Places success of the organization ahead of personal gain. ENERGIZING  Displays an engaging, can-do, optimistic attitude.  Makes work fun.  Inspires others to achieve more than they imagined.  Recognizes and rewards the contributions of others.
  31. 31. Action Verbs for Resume Accomplished, Finalized, Processed, Succeeded Achieved, Founded, Produced, Superseded  Delivered, Invented, Serviced, Tripled Approved, Generated, Promoted, Supervised  Demonstrated, Launched, Set, Assisted, Grew, Proposed, Terminated Uncovered Built, Headed, Purchased, Traced  Designed, Led, Simplified, Unified Completed, Implemented, Recommended, Tracked  Developed, Maintained, Sold, Utilized Conducted, Improved, Redesigned, Traded  Devised, Managed, Sparked, Vacated Consolidated, Improvised, Reduced, Trained  Directed, Negotiated, Staffed, Verified Controlled, Increased, Reorganized, Transferred Converted, Installed, Researched, Transformed  Doubled, Operated, Started, Widened Created, Introduced, Revised, Translated  Earned, Organized, Streamlined, Won  Eliminated, Originated, Strengthened, Withdrew  Enhanced, Participated, Stressed, Worked  Established, Performed, Stretched, Wrote  Expanded, Planned, Structured  Cut, Instituted, Scheduled, Trimmed

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