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Coordinated identifier infrastructure enabling Geoscience researchers to meet future directions in scholarly communications

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Coordinated identifier infrastructure enabling Geoscience researchers to meet future directions in scholarly communications
Poster at eResearch 2018 conference by: Natasha Simons, Lesley Wyborn, Mingfang Wu, Keith Russell, Jens Klump, Tim Rawling

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Coordinated identifier infrastructure enabling Geoscience researchers to meet future directions in scholarly communications

  1. 1. Obtaining Identifiers for Software Over the last 10 years, the Australian Research Data Commons (ARDC) and its predecessors have been building an infrastructure for data citation which assists researchers to enable FAIR publication of data and ensure proper recognition and citation of their data in their own and any subsequent publications that also use their data. Australian Geoscience Researchers can obtain information on identifiers for their software here: https://www.ands.org.au/working-with-data/citation- and-identifiers/software-citation. Obtaining Identifiers for Data Over the last 10 years, the Australian Research Data Commons (ARDC) and its predecessors have been building an infrastructure for data citation which assists researchers to enable FAIR publication of data and ensure proper recognition and citation of their data in their own and any subsequent publications that also use their data. Australian Geoscience Researchers can obtain information about identifiers for their data here: https://www.ands.org.au/working-with-data/citation- and-identifiers/data-citation. Coordinated identifier infrastructures enabling Geoscience researchers to meet future directions in scholarly communications The Geoscience Paper of the Future The Geoscience Paper of the Future was recently proposed to explain how researchers can fully document, share, and cite all their research products including physical samples, data, software, and computational provenance[1] and enable them to be FAIR (Findable, Accessible, Interoperable and Reusable [2]. This requires identifiers for each research product. 1. Gil, Y et al. (2016). Toward the Geoscience Paper of the Future: Best Practices for Documenting and Sharing Research from Data to Software to Provenance. Earth and Space Science, 3, 388-415. https://doi.org/10.1002/2015EA000136 2. Wilkinson, M.D. et al. (2016). The FAIR Guiding Principles for scientific data management and stewardship. Scientific Data 3. https://doi.org/10.1038/sdata.2016.18 Obtaining Identifiers for Physical Samples The International Geo Sample Number (IGSN), used on five continents to uniquely identify physical samples, allows researchers to gain credit for sample collection and preparation and enable them to trace where other analytical work is published on samples that they collected and curated. Australian Geoscience researchers can obtain access to IGSNs for their physical samples (specimens) here: https://www.ands.org.au/working-with- data/citation-and-identifiers/igsn Fifty years ago, most data that underpinned a publication could be represented in typeset tables, but with the advent of the digital age and the computerisation of instruments, volumes of data collected became too large to present as tables in a paper and data became included as a supplement to the paper accessible by contacting the journal, or else ‘by contacting the author’. Such approaches limit the ability to test the veracity and reproducibility of a publication and do not guarantee accessibility and persistence of input research artefacts. The Geoscience Paper of the Future has been proposed and the Australian Research Data Commons (ARDC) and AuScope have been working together to make access to identifiers easier for Geoscience researchers. Natasha Simons1, Julia Martin2, Mingfang Wu3, Adrian Burton4, Jens Klump5, Keith Russell6, Gerry Ryder7, Lesley Wyborn8, Tim Rawling9 1Australian Research Data Commons (ARDC), Brisbane, Australia natasha.simons@ardc.edu.au; 2ARDC, Canberra, Australia Julia.Martin@ardc.edu.au; 3ARDC, Melbourne, Australia Mingfang.Wu@ardc.edu.au; 4ARDC, Brisbane, Australia Adrian.Burton@ardc.edu.au; 5CSIRO Mineral Resources, Perth, Australia, jens.klump@csiro.au; 6ARDC, Melbourne, Australia, Keith.Russell@ardc.edu.au; 7ARDC, Adelaide, Australia, gerry.ryder@ardc.edu.au; 8 National Computational Infrastructure, ANU, Canberra, Australia, Lesley.Wyborn@anu.edu.au; 9AuScope, Melbourne Tim.Rawling@unimelb.edu.au Join us online: auscope.org.au | Twitter, LinkedIn and YouTube @AuScope | info@auscope.org.au Software, in source code or compiled form, is pervasive in Research. software should be cited in a similar fashion to data and research papers. ARDC have developed guidelines for citing software based on international recommendations of FORCE 11 software citation principals, DataCite, CodeMeta, and others. .

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