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Skilling-up-in-research-data-management-20181128

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Skilling up In Research Data Management: A crash course for librarians and data stewards
Workshop held in Sydney 28th Nov 2018

Published in: Education
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Skilling-up-in-research-data-management-20181128

  1. 1. Room 400, Level 4, Building 11
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  7. 7. Photo by Ricky Kharawala on Unsplash …
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  16. 16. •Exploratory/Scoping •Reuse/Secondary data analysis •Can be starting point or ad hoc •Peer review •Reproduce/extend results •Repurpose (e.g. for mashups, visualisations, simulations) •Verify claims (e.g. report findings) *Not in any order; not exhaustive!
  17. 17. •Google •Ask a colleague •Find link to data in a journal article •Data journals •Data registries e.g. re3data.org •Open data portals e.g. data.gov •Institutional repositories •Data / Discipline repositories e.g. Dryad •Project website •Data discovery aggregators like Research Data Australia, Google Dataset •Library catalogues, databases *Not in any order; not exhaustive!
  18. 18. When creating metadata records, keep in mind that finding data is: ● Movable feast / changing beast ● No standard practice, universal standard or vocab ● Databases are non-exhaustive ● Methods for searching and terms driven by why people are looking and how the data is stored
  19. 19. ● Together, we’re going to build a rainbow of discipline specific data examples! ● Working in pairs, explore re3data (or beyond!) to find data sources that you would recommend for any specific number of disciplines. ● For each data source: a. find some data b. tell us how you got there - eg google or repository c. why it’s a good example to show someone else.
  20. 20. Here are some scenarios to start you off: ○ Showing a researcher where they might find social science data ○ Data that may not have a disciplinary “home” ○ Incredibly niche specialised scientific data (find a rabbit hole) ○ Australian geographic and/or spatialised data ○ Internet time server data ○ Geological sample data ● re3data.org ● https://researchdata.ands.org.au/ ● https://www.icpsr.umich.edu/ ● https://ada.edu.au/ ● http://www.geosamples.org/ ● https://riojournal.com/
  21. 21. CookieMonsterCupcakebyBrettJordanhttps://flic.kr/p/7ZRSzA
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  23. 23. https://bit.ly/2vMsh3M (https://www.ands-nectar-rds.org.au/fair-tool)
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  25. 25. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ABF2FvSPVYE
  26. 26. Your task: 1. Work as a team at your tables 2. Take one of the CSV datasets at 3. Describe the dataset by creating a metadata record. Think about: title, creators, date, short description and so on. 4. Bring your record to whole class discussion Exercise time: 10 mins then whole class discussion
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  28. 28. Your task: 1. Work as a team at your tables 2. Review the record you put together for the CSV file 3. Select a metadata schema of your choice e.g. Dublin Core, RIF-CS, others.. 4. Create a new metadata record using the schema of your choice and the values (attributes) you listed in your original CSV file record Exercise time: 10 mins then whole class discussion
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  34. 34. Photo by rawpixel on Unsplash
  35. 35. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gCsQM0KNXhU
  36. 36. Photo by John O'Nolan on Unsplash
  37. 37. Why oh why should I use a DOI?
  38. 38. https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.60bn 81v
  39. 39. Photo by Amaury Salas on Unsplash Find information about this DOI: 10.4225/08/5858219e78f9a ● What type of research output does this DOI point to? ● What is the organisation associated with this DOI? ● Can you get to the full text from the DOI? Now search for the same DOI in DataCite search: https://search.datacite.org/ ● How do you cite it in Vancouver style? ● Who issued the DOI? Finally, go to DataCite stats: https://stats.datacite.org/ ● For the Australian National Data Service, which organisation minted the most DOIs for 2018?
  40. 40. Photo by Tyler Nix on Unsplash
  41. 41. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Mx EAMIhawg
  42. 42. https://aaf.edu.au/orcid/
  43. 43. http://www.geosamples.org/igsnabo ut https://www.ands.org.au/online-s ervices/igsn-service
  44. 44. Photo by Cristian Escobar on Unsplash
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  46. 46. There is no change in the high number of researchers valuing a data citation the same as an article - from 78% in 2016 to 77% in 2017 Digital Science Report: The State of Open Data 2017, p.8
  47. 47. Your task: 1. Work as a team at your tables 2. Look up and read what these publishers are saying about data citation: • Wiley’s Data Citation Policy - https://authorservices.wiley.com/author-resources/Journal-Authors/open- access/data-sharing-citation/index.html • Springer Nature Research Data Policy FAQs (why and how cite data) - https://www.springernature.com/gp/authors/research-data-policy/faqs/12 327154 3. Discuss with each other: are the policies the same? Are the citation styles the same? Is it clear information for authors? Exercise time: 5 mins
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  56. 56. Photo by Alex Block on Unsplash
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  61. 61. ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● Edusmartskills.com. (2018). [online] Available at: https://www.edusmartskills.com/webAssets/images/wso_img.jpg [Accessed 14 May 2018].
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  63. 63. ● ● ● $ helena.lynn@sydney.edu.au
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  65. 65. ● ● ● ● PROS CONS ● Self explanatory ● Easy to follow ● Time saving ● Distribute in different ways ● Linked to further resources ● Missing information ● Information overload ● May not be search engine optimised ● Hard to find
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  67. 67. Source: https://www.purdue.edu/research/publications-data/infographics/ Source: https://www.ands.org.au/guides
  68. 68. ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● Source: https://visual.ly/community/infographic
  69. 69. F2F Online Self Help
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  71. 71. Adapted from: Fao.org. (2018). [online] Available at: http://www.fao.org/docrep/015/i2516e/i2516e.pdf [Accessed 1 May 2018].
  72. 72. ● Half day, Full day? ● Program Timings? ● Exercises/Activities? ● Content? ● Modules? ● Learning Outcomes? ● Technology? ● Learning assessment? ● How to? ● Software? ppt, piktochart? ● Process or Info sharing? ● A4, Brochure, Web?
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