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Ac fibonacci viva

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2nd Year Clay Vessel Art Scheme

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Ac fibonacci viva

  1. 1. Athboy Community School, Co. Meath Number of Pupils: Boys-354, Girls-237 Angela Clarke, PME 2 SP Assessment Block One Tuesday 10 4th January 2017
  2. 2. Fractals Shapes and forms that look similar under any magnification. Fractals are a natural phenomena which display patterns which recur at smaller and smaller scales The Fibonacci sequence is nature’s numbering system, also known as the golden selection and the golden spiral . Fibonacci’s equiangular spiral which does not alter its shape as its size increases (known as self- similarity or miraculous spiral). Fibobacci Day- 23rd November Numbers - Fibonacci inspired clay vessel Six Lessons, Duration of each lessons: 75mins Aim of scheme To design and make a clay vessel through the exploration of line, shape, pattern, symmetry, the mathematical inquiry of nature and a variety of clay techniques, based on the theme of numbers. This scheme fits in to a broad range of students interests and is on the prescribed syllabus for the junior cert curriculum Specific Vocabulary: Patterns, nature, form, clay, ceramic, vessel, fibonacci sequence, fractal, phenomena, tessellations
  3. 3. Planning: Introduction to the class- Small photos Plan for diverse needs of learners - 24 students Danny (ADD), Stephanie (learning problems), Sophie (SNA), Chelsea and Mya (High level of ability), Aishling and Oliver (concentration issues) Expected Learning outcomes - At the end of this scheme All students will explore ideas about numbers through investigative inquiry of numbers in nature and use drawing and clay techniques to communicate their ideas based on the theme. Most students will be able to use drawing and clay techniques to communicate ideas and to talk, think and feel about their own work. Some students will collect visual and other information to help develop their work, comment on the similarities and differences in their own and others work, adapt and improve their own work. To support students learning I first considered 1. Differentiation 2. Prior learning 3. That this scheme would be relevant (experiences culture and backgrounds) 4. That students understand why completing each task on time is important 5. That future learning is explicit - 6. Possible ways of adapting this scheme 7. Cross curricular links, Numeracy, Literacy, Science, Technology, Art, Graphics The Matchmaker by Gerrit Van Honthorst (Lightbox)
  4. 4. Teaching strategies for successful outcomes of this scheme Personal connection with students whenever possible Give students opportunities to work independently, in groups and to give each other feedback Talk to students - Involve students in the decisions, the setting of deadlines and adjust scheme as required Ask questions - Enable students to develop higher order thinking, problem, solving skills Listen and give immediate and specific feedback Demonstrations - Clear instructions, Small groups or individual instruction where appropriate. High Expectations - I expected the students to be responsible Scaffold learning to accommodate growing knowledge Let students know that I will help them to achieve successful outcomes 2nd year project: Numbers in nature - Fibonacci inspired ceramic vessel Tutor: Angela Clarke Aim of Lesson: To design and make a clay vessel through the exploration of line, shape, pattern, symmetry, the mathematical inquiry of nature and a variety of clay techniques, based on theme of numbers in nature. Theme: Fibonacci numbers in nature Definition of a Vessel A vessel is a hollow container, such as a bowl, cup, or vase that is designed to hold something. Its parts generally include a foot or base, walls and opening, a rim or lip, and sometimes shoulders, neck, lid, or handle. Materials: Objects from nature to investigate through drawing – Shells, Flowers, Fruit, Vegetables, Cones, Leaves etc, Calculator, magnifying glass, post-it sticky notes, masking tape, push pins. Thoughts and considerations before starting this brief: Keep the form of the vessel simple, considering the making time. Try to engage with the playful potential of this theme. Primary and secondary sources: It would be very useful if you draw rough sketches for a nature inspired vessel, based on the theme for next class, as the time is very short. These should be small in scale and should explore a variety of ideas. Use secondary sources, such as images from newspapers, magazines or the internet. These can be used as inspiration relating to form, surface texture/pattern of different kinds of vessels. Images of natural objects such as a snowflake, shell, flower, honeycomb, or leaves to create repeating patterns. Some suggestions for artists to research through the library (or internet): Pueblo native American pots by Maria Martinez, Japanese ceramic artist Hitomi Hosono, American artist Angela Schwer, Canadian artist Susan Collette and Irish artist Nuala O’Donovan.
  5. 5. Classroom strategies: Visual aids Primary sources- Examples of objects from nature Shells, Flowers, Fruit, Cones, lemons, Pinapple, leaves eg Fern, etc Collection of vessels from around the world Secondary source – Images of the natural mathematical patterns such as the Fibonacci sequence (nature’s numbering system ) the golden selection and the golden spiral Images of Fibonacci’s equiangular spiral which does not alter its shape as its size increases (known as self-similarity or miraculous spiral). Images of Fractals State assessment rubric- performance indicators and grade level accomplishments Presentation boards: Fibonacci facts, Supporting study artists, Brief history of clay vessels Differentiation: worksheets, instructional handouts, secondary source images, rubbings Classroom climate A safe and pleasant learning environment- no hands rule, traffic systems Resources
  6. 6. Investigating and making - Drawing /Analysing from primary source Evaluating and developing work – Presentation, Drawings and Pattern designs will be displayed Worksheets – How to draw a golden spiral. Complete the natural pattern, square boxes to create patterns Lesson one To engage with the natural environment with mathematical inquiry. To classify natural shapes and describe natural properties. knowledge (cognitive domain) To demonstrate an awareness of line and shape through observational drawing, and how shape can create design and patterns in relation to nature. skills (psychomotor domain) To make connections between nature items and possible ideas for their ceramic vessel, developing the theme numbers in nature. To engage in preliminary work involving critical thought and specifically deciding on their own idea based on the theme. attitudes (affective domain). Here is what your completed paper will look like: ©Maggie's Earth Adventures, LLC 2001 _______________________ cci Spiral List
  7. 7. Lesson two To observe how line and numbers can be used to define shape, pattern, and form in art. To be able to perceive positive and negative shapes in relation to numbers. To develop their ability to represent numbers as abstract shapes To be aware of how geometric patterns can be repeated shapes to create tessellations. knowledge (cognitive domain) To demonstrate an awareness of line and shape, how shape can create design and patterns in relation to numbers. skills (psychomotor domain) To make connections between numbers and possible ideas for their ceramic vessel, developing the theme numbers in nature. To engage in preliminary work involving critical thought and specifically deciding on their own idea based on the theme. attitudes (affective domain). Evaluating and developing work Exploring and developing ideas Investigating and making Tessellating Patterns Using triangles, hexagons and diamonds, continue to build the pattern. Sarah KabotMiroJasper Johns Cy TwomblyCharles Demuth
  8. 8. Lesson three To make a pinch-pot, coils and to explore clay as a medium for creating a ceramic vessel. knowledge (cognitive domain) To use clay safely and effectively. To use a range of objects such as string, lace, buttons, nails, etc to create different textures, lines, shapes and patterns on the clay. To create a clay samples using found objects to indicate pattern and texture. skills (psychomotor domain) To be aware of structure; how clay can be manipulated and combined to create structure, and the importance of structure to create form. To generate a range of ideas involving critical thought and specifically deciding on their own idea based on the theme. attitudes (affective domain). Evaluating and developing work Investigating and creating designs Exploring clay and developing ideas
  9. 9. Lesson four To critically evaluate their own work to date through discussion and to be able to look at their design ideas to see what needs to be added to improve their design. To make connection between the clay samples and possible ideas for their own vessels. attitudes (affective domain). To use clay safely and effectively. To make a clay slab as a medium for creating a ceramic vessel. skills (psychomotor domain) To use a range of objects such as plastic numbers, string, lace, buttons, nails, etc to create different textures, lines, shapes and patterns on the clay. To be aware of structure; how clay can be manipulated and combined to create structure, and the importance of structure to create form. knowledge (cognitive domain) Evaluating work
  10. 10. Lesson five To consider the development of the surface of the vessel further by adding colour. To be aware how colour can be manipulated and combined to create shape and pattern and to be aware of how colour can enable realisation of their design. knowledge (cognitive domain) Make connections between the previous drawings and possible ideas for developing further the theme. attitudes (affective domain). Realising of the design. To effectively make a finished ceramic vessel. skills (psychomotor domain) Evaluating and developing work Investigating colour and making Exploring and developing ideas about colour through groupwork. Jasper Johns William Morris
  11. 11. Lesson six To be aware of the development and construction of a ceramic vessel. knowledge (cognitive domain) To be able to effectively make a ceramic vessel by applying media, techniques and processes. skills (psychomotor domain) To reflect upon and assess the characteristics and merits of their work and the work of others. To communicate their experiences and ideas. attitudes (affective domain). 9 _______________________ ____________ Name Class DESIGNS FROM NATURE Be inspired by the natural world. On the left are some shapes and forms from the natural world. In the empty boxes on the right sketch a design of some practical object like shoes, a chair, a car, a house, teapot, or anything useful. Let your design be based on the forms of the natural objects. Share your ideas with the class when you are finished. Shape and Form in Art
  12. 12. Evaluation Challenging aspects: 1. I had no host teacher for the first two weeks, so small things like access to rooms and codes for computers were problematic. 2. Availability of sufficient quantities of materials such as clay and paint glazes was a small issue, but I adapted the success criteria to reflect this. 3. Absenteeism was a problem with a significant percentage of my students. Successful aspects: 1. I had students ranging in abilities and learning needs, this gave me an opportunity to develop a good understanding of how best to adapt my teaching to suit their needs. 2. My schemes introduced new concepts and processes to the school and were constructive for both the students and art department staff. 3. I felt my teaching has improved and was effective and appreciated, which I found very rewarding. 4. I achieved the learning outcomes that I had planned for. JC Art, Craft & Design Student: Class, 2nd Years –Mr Fox Project: Option-Pottery/Ceramics Assessor: Mrs. Clarke Criteria Evidence Criteria Evidence Criteria Evidence Criteria Evidence Support Studies,; Research/ Relavance, Personal input Minimal/some ability to develop ideas through investigations informed by contextual and other sources. Minimal/limited ability to demonstrate analytical and cultural understanding. Minimal exploration of Artist’s relevance to project. Artist research is limited. A generally consistent ability to effectively develop ideas through investigations informed by contextual and other sources. A generally consistent ability to demonstrate analytical and cultural understanding. Good Artist studies and clear notes to explain relevance. Artist research is accurate with some personal notes. A consistent ability to effectively develop and explore ideas through investigations purposefully informed by contextual and other sources. A consistent ability to demonstrate analytical and cultural understanding. Skilful Artist studies and thoughtful notes to explain relevance. Artist research is skilful, personal and thoughtful. A highly developed ability to effectively develop and creatively explore ideas through investigations informed by contextual and other sources. A confident and highly developed ability to demonstrate analytical and cultural understanding. Highly skilful Artist studies and insightful notes to explain relevance. Artist research is creative, highly personal and insightful. 2 5 8 10 Development; Evidence of stimuli and ideas, Personal creative response, Interpretation. Minimal/some ability to refine ideas through experimenting and selecting appropriate resources, media, materials, techniques and processes as their work progresses. Minimal development of a limited idea. Limited range of materials explored with minimal success. Minimal planning of outcome. A generally consistent ability to effectively refine ideas through experimenting and selecting appropriate resources, media, materials, techniques and processes as their work progresses. Effective development of a well refined idea. Range of materials explored with consistently good success. Good planning of outcome. A consistent ability to thoughtfully refine ideas through purposeful experimentation and selection of appropriate resources, media, materials, techniques and processes as their work progresses. Thoughtful development of a creative idea. Wide range of materials explored skilfully. Thoughtful & coherent planning of alternative outcomes. A highly developed ability to thoughtfully refine ideas through purposeful and discriminating experimentation and selection of appropriate resources, media, materials, techniques and processes as their work progresses. Imaginative development of a highly refined and mature idea. Wide range of materials explored creatively and imaginatively. Highly thoughtful & creative planning of alternative outcomes. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 25 Preparation; investigation/ Problem solving,Drawing, Planning, Use of media .Minimal/some ability to record ideas, observations and insights relevant to intentions in visual and/or other forms. Written communication, to record ideas, where appropriate, is at a very basic/limited level. Brainstorm – minimal ideas. Collect minimal pictures. Mark-making/making ability is minimal. Written notes are minimal. A generally consistent ability to effectively record ideas, observations and insights that are generally relevant to intentions in visual and/or other forms. Written communication to record ideas, where appropriate, is reasonably clear. Brainstorm – range of ideas. Collect a good range of primary & secondary source pictures. Mark-making/making ability is consistently good. Written notes are clear. A consistent ability to skilfully record ideas, observations and insights relevant to intentions in visual and/or other forms. Written communication to record ideas, where appropriate, is clear and coherent. Brainstorm – detailed/effective. Collect a wide range of relevant primary & secondary source pics. Mark-making/making ability is consistently skilful. Written notes are clear and coherent. A highly developed ability to fluently and skilfully record ideas, observations and insights relevant to intentions in visual and/or other forms. Written communication to record ideas, where appropriate, is fluent and accurate. Brainstorm – highly developed. Collect personal and creative primary & secondary source pics. Mark-making/making ability is highly developed and skilful. Written notes are fluent and accurate. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 25 Realisation Evidence of skill, Creativity, Quality, Presentation Minimal/some ability to present a personal, informed and meaningful response when endeavouring to realise intentions. Minimal/limited ability to demonstrate critical understanding when attempting, where appropriate, to make connections between visual, written, oral or other elements. Outcome is incomplete, limited and lacks meaning. Minimal connections with Artists. A generally consistent ability to effectively present a personal, informed and meaningful response when realising intentions. A generally consistent ability to demonstrate critical understanding and where appropriate make connections between visual, written, oral or other elements Outcome is personal, meaningful and visually successful. Good connections with Artists. A consistent ability to competently present a personal, informed and meaningful response when realising intentions. A consistent ability to demonstrate critical understanding and where appropriate, make perceptive connections between visual, written, oral or other elements. Outcome is personal, meaningful, skilful and realises your intentions. Thoughtful connections with Artists. A highly developed ability to competently present an imaginative, personal, informed and meaningful response when realising intentions. A highly developed ability to demonstrate critical understanding and where appropriate, make perceptive and discriminating connections between visual, written, oral or other elements. Outcome is personal, insightful, highly skilled, creative and realises your intentions. Imaginative connections with Artists. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 40 Interim marks /20 Interim marks /20 Interim marks /20 Final mark /100 Red text means incomplete or not yet achieved. Date: 25/11/16 Grade: Date: 2/12/16 Grade: Date: 9/12/16 Grade: Date: 16/12/16 Grade: Green text means complete and achieved. 0- 9 10- 24 25- 39 40- 54 55- 69 70- 84 85- 100 NG F E D C B A

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