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Sc2218 lecture 8 (2010)
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Sc2218 lecture 8 (2010)

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Lecture 8: Culture and Commodification

Lecture 8: Culture and Commodification

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  • Things (or at least some things) have use value (give examples) Commodities, by definition, have exchange value. The nature of commodity exchange through markets, especially one in which money is used, leads to “commodity fetishism”
  • In a market system, commodities are “fetishized” What does this mean? A fetish is something that stands for something else (and also has a secondary meaning as an “object of desire”) The exchange value of commodities is based on social relationships among people; but people generally don’t see it that way – they see value as somehow inherent in the commodity (the thing) and/or in the price Marx – “commodity fetish” Money heightens this effect of separating use value from exchange value (other things, used like money, can as well… gold, seashells, etc.). For Marx – the values of commodities stood for the social relationships of production (relationship between labor, capitalist, and consumer); He was mainly interested in how this affected the relationship of labor and capital. Markets are SYMBOLIC systems of VALUES
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