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Detecting and avoiding_plagiarism
Detecting and avoiding_plagiarism
Detecting and avoiding_plagiarism
Detecting and avoiding_plagiarism
Detecting and avoiding_plagiarism
Detecting and avoiding_plagiarism
Detecting and avoiding_plagiarism
Detecting and avoiding_plagiarism
Detecting and avoiding_plagiarism
Detecting and avoiding_plagiarism
Detecting and avoiding_plagiarism
Detecting and avoiding_plagiarism
Detecting and avoiding_plagiarism
Detecting and avoiding_plagiarism
Detecting and avoiding_plagiarism
Detecting and avoiding_plagiarism
Detecting and avoiding_plagiarism
Detecting and avoiding_plagiarism
Detecting and avoiding_plagiarism
Detecting and avoiding_plagiarism
Detecting and avoiding_plagiarism
Detecting and avoiding_plagiarism
Detecting and avoiding_plagiarism
Detecting and avoiding_plagiarism
Detecting and avoiding_plagiarism
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Detecting and avoiding_plagiarism

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ashford university info.

ashford university info.

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  1. Detecting and Avoiding Plagiarism
  2. Academic Integrity PolicyThe Academic Integrity Policy of Ashford University States:“Students of Ashford University will follow expected levels ofacademic integrity. Ashford University defines academicmisconduct as dishonest and/or deceptive attempts to fulfillacademic requirements. Cheating, furnishing fabricated or falseinformation to Ashford University officials and adjuncts (such aslying to affect a grade change), and plagiarism constitute acts ofacademic misconduct, and will be met with censure.”We have designed this tutorial to assist you in detecting andavoiding plagiarism.
  3. What is Plagiarism?According to the Academic Integrity Policy of Ashford University:“Plagiarism occurs when a student deliberately uses the ideas, language, oranother writer’s original material (that is not common knowledge) withoutacknowledging the source. Plagiarized materials include texts (print or on-line), as well as the work of other students. Plagiarizing denies the studentthe powerful opportunity to develop as an ethical and conscientious humanbeing. Herein rests the greatest reason not to plagiarize.”Plagiarism most often occurs when a student fails to properly cite his or hersource of information. We will now explore various errors in citation. For areview of APA citations, please click here. To begin the tutorial, pleaseclick here.
  4. What is Common Knowledge?Some students have the mistaken notion that they must give credit to asource only when they use a direct quotation. Paraphrasing (putting ideasinto your own words) or changing a word or two in a source does not relievethe student of responsibility to credit the source. If an idea is not your own,you must cite the source in the text of the paper and at the end of the paperas a reference. The only exception to this rule is if the idea the student usesis common knowledge. Facts that are common knowledge will generally beknown by many people and can easily be found or referenced. Commonknowledge facts (for example, that the Robert Kennedy was assassinated in1968) do not need to be documented. However, students must referencelesser known ideas and interpretations of the common knowledge (forexample, a press release defense attorney Lawrence Teeter made regardingthe possible innocence of Sirhan Sirhan, the accused assassin). Next
  5. Common Knowledge?Read the two statements below. Click on the choice that is common knowledge:3. Albert Camus was born in Mondovi, Algeria in 1913 and died in 1960 in an auto4. I was saddened when the great guitarist Stevie Ray Vaughan died. I’ll always re Next
  6. Detecting Plagiarism• We will now explore different examples of a mock student’s writing. You will first see the original text from the article, followed by the student’s use of the material. You will then determine if the student is committing plagiarism or not. Next
  7. Example 1“A piece of literature has a social meaning, which means that the author produced thework within a certain historical and social context. The language the author uses, thesocial conventions he or she mentions, and descriptions of time and place all form thesocial meaning of the author’s work. We may be part of a very different social contextthan the author; but by investigating the social context of the author, we can arrive ata clearer understanding of the author’s message.”From Davis, S. (2005). Engaging the Text. Retrieved May 31, 2006, from LIB326: Historical Contexts andLiterature from Ashford University Web site: http://blackboard.ashford.com. (taken from page 1)Student Wrote: “’ A piece of literature has a social meaning, which meansthat the author produced the work within a certain historical and socialcontext.’ Thus, by studying the context of an author, we can betterunderstand his or her message (Davis, 2005, p. 1).”Acceptable Plagiarism Next
  8. Example 2“While we might not actually know with certainty what the author meant toportray in a particular work, by understanding such factors as his or hersocial class, ethnicity, gender, belief systems, and historical milieu we canarrive at an educated and consistent understanding.”From Davis, S. (2005). Engaging the Text. Retrieved May 31, 2006, from LIB326: Historical Contexts andLiterature from Ashford University Web site: http://blackboard.ashford.com. (taken from page 2)Student Wrote: “As Davis (2005) indicates, although ‘we might not actuallyknow’ what an author meant to portray, a careful exploration of the author’sbackground and his or her historical context can help the reader ‘arrive at aneducated and consistent understanding (p.2).’” Acceptable Plagiarism Next
  9. Example 3“Most authors have consistent themes that carry through their works. Forexample, a single story by Camus might seem hopelessly confusing until wehave read more Camus. We might then realize that the author concernedhimself with themes such as man’s need to find meaning in the world.”From Davis, S. (2005). Engaging the Text. Retrieved May 31, 2006, from LIB326: Historical Contexts andLiterature from Ashford University Web site: http://blackboard.ashford.com. (taken from page 2)Student Wrote: “I agree with the importance of reading multiple works,because, as Davis (2005) relates, I was ‘hopelessly confused’ upon readingmy first story by Albert Camus (p.2). I found, however, that as I read moreabout the author, I did find ‘consistent themes” throughout his work (p.2).” Acceptable Plagiarism Next
  10. Example 4“Literature has the power to allow us to ‘see’ into another time and place: it allows usto share in the pain and joy of our shared humanity. In studying literature, we oftenget frustrated when we try to decipher what a piece of writing ‘means.’ Rather thanbecoming frustrated, once we engage with the text—once we share in the experienceof ourselves and the author—we become part of the text itself.”From Davis, S. (2005). Engaging the Text. Retrieved May 31, 2006, from LIB326: Historical Contexts andLiterature from Ashford University Web site: http://blackboard.ashford.com. (taken from page 1)Student Wrote: “A piece of writing can bring the reader back to another timein history. Instead of getting frustrated by literature, we can really share ourexperiences with the author (Davis, 2005, p. 1).” Acceptable Plagiarism Next
  11. Example 5“At times, when confronted with a text that seems difficult to read, we can learn moreabout the manner in which an author wrote by doing some research. For example,the poet T.S. Eliot (1888-1965) belonged to a group of poets called the ‘imagists,’ andthey styled their work in opposition to the sentimental works of poets such asWordsworth.”From Davis, S. (2005). Engaging the Text. Retrieved May 31, 2006, from LIB326: Historical Contexts andLiterature from Ashford University Web site: http://blackboard.ashford.com. (taken from page 1)Student Wrote: “Davis (2005) believes that research can help us learn moreabout the manner in which an author wrote. For example, through researchwe would find that the poet T.S. Eliot wrote in a very different way than thesentimental poet Wordsworth.” Acceptable Plagiarism Next
  12. Recap: What is Plagiarism I To summarize, Ashford University defines the following acts as acts of plagiarism:• Copying text from printed materials, which include books, magazines, encyclopedias, and newspapers, et al. – The modification of a) with the intent of changing verbiage, changing words, or interspacing the student’s work into the plagiarized work.• “Copy and Paste” plagiarism, which involves copying and pasting materials from Internet sources and presenting them as one’s original work. – The modification of b) with the intent of changing verbiage, changing words, or interspacing the student’s work into the plagiarized work. Next
  13. Recap: What is Plagiarism II• The use of another student’s work. Even if the student has the permission of the other student, the use of another’s work constitutes an act of collusion, which constitutes an act of plagiarism.• The use of materials purchased from Internet sources.• “Recycling” of old papers for a current course. Students may only use previous work to support current work (and the previous work must be cited properly).• Paraphrasing or summarizing another’s work without giving appropriate credit. Return to Start
  14. Key: Common Knowledge• Correct• “Albert Camus was born in Mondovi, Algeria in 1913 and died in 1960 in an automobile crash.” Is information that is readily accessible and considered common knowledge.• Click Here to Return to Tutorial
  15. Key: Common Knowledge• Incorrect• The author of this statement is paraphrasing the text of an interview Stevie Ray Vaughan gave at the Mann Music Center in Philadelphia, Pa. on 6/30/87. By not stating the source, the author is committing an act of plagiarism.• Click here to return to tutorial
  16. Key: Example 1• Incorrect. The student commits plagiarism because the first sentence is a direct quote without a proper citation. While the student cites the second sentence, since the sentence so closely reflects Davis’s original work, the student should first write, “Further, Davis believes that…”• Return to Example 1
  17. Key: Example 1• Correct. The student commits plagiarism because the first sentence is a direct quote without a proper citation. While the student cites the second sentence, since the sentence so closely reflects Davis’s original work, the student should first write, “Further, Davis believes that…”• Return to Example 1
  18. Key: Example 2• Correct. This sentence beautifully incorporates Davis’s work and expresses a powerful thought. Davis’s name begins the sentence, and the student uses direct quotations set off with quotation marks, and he or she is sure to cite the source of the original material.• Return to Example 2
  19. Key: Example 2• Incorrect. The student’s work is not plagiarized. This sentence beautifully incorporates Davis’s work and expresses a powerful thought. Davis’s name begins the sentence, and the student uses direct quotations set off with quotation marks, and he or she is sure to cite the source of the original material.• Return to Example 2
  20. Key: Example 3• Correct. The student has properly cited the original material with quotation marks and cited the source material properly. Notice how the student has used Davis’s words to support his or her own. Thus, the student is careful to show the reader both his or her opinion and the relation of that opinion to Davis’s original material.• Return to Example 3
  21. Key: Example 3• Incorrect. The student has not committed plagiarism. The student has properly cited the original material with quotation marks and cited the source material properly. Notice how the student has used Davis’s words to support his or her own. Thus, the student is careful to show the reader both his or her opinion and the relation of that opinion to Davis’s original material.• Return to Example 3
  22. Key: Example 4• Incorrect. This student has committed plagiarism. The student paraphrases Davis’s material in the first sentence, but he or she does not directly quote or properly cite Davis’s work. While the student cites the second sentence, the student is too closely mimicking the author’s original work. As with Example 1, the student must use either his or her own language and cite the source, or be more careful in showing the reader that he or she is paraphrasing the author.• Return to Example 4
  23. Key: Example 4• Correct. This student has committed plagiarism. The student paraphrases Davis’s material in the first sentence, but he or she does not directly quote or properly cite Davis’s work. While the student cites the second sentence, the student is too closely mimicking the author’s original work. As with Example 1, the student must use either his or her own language and cite the source, or be more careful in showing the reader that he or she is paraphrasing the author.• Return to Example 4
  24. Key: Example 5• Incorrect. The student has committed plagiarism. While the student gives credit to Davis, he or she does not let the reader know the source he or she used. Regarding the second sentence, the student commits plagiarism because his or her paraphrasing of Davis is much too similar to the original work and is not cited.• Return to Example 5
  25. Key: Example 5• Correct. The student has committed plagiarism. While the student gives credit to Davis, he or she does not let the reader know the source he or she used. Regarding the second sentence, the student commits plagiarism because his or her paraphrasing of Davis is much too similar to the original work and is not cited.• Return to Example 5

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