Simple subjects and simple predicates

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Simple subjects and simple predicates

  1. 1. Simple Subjects and Simple Predicates<br />
  2. 2. A sentence has two main parts<br />The Subject<br />Tells who or what the sentence is about<br />The Predicate<br />Tells something about the subject<br />
  3. 3. Examples<br />The left column contains the complete subject for each sentence. The right contains the complete predicates. Put the to columns together and you have four complete sentences.<br />
  4. 4. Simple Subject & Predicates<br />The complete subject or predicate may have many words in it, but they always have a basic core few words that are the simple subject and the simple predicate.<br />
  5. 5. Look at the examples used previously. The words that have been highlighted are the simple subjects and the simple predicates<br />
  6. 6. Simple Subject<br />The important (or main) words in a sentence that let the reader know who or what is doing something or being something is the simple subject. The simple subjects are bolded and highlighted below.<br />A few years ago, the Titusville Rockets had a fantastic football team.<br />Studentsfrom each class are voted to be on the student council.<br />
  7. 7. Understood Subject<br />In an imperative sentence, the subject, you, is understood:<br />(You) Put the dishes in the dishwasher.<br />(You) Go to the library and do your homework.<br />
  8. 8. Simple Predicate<br />The simple predicate is the word or words that show the action or being in the sentence. <br />Being Verb example:<br />They becameengaged after dating for over a year.<br />Action Verb example:<br />The dog createda mess while I was gone.<br />
  9. 9. Verb Phrase<br />Sometimes the simple predicate needs more than one word. This is then called a verb phrase.<br />Examples:<br />Her rude behavior has become hard to deal with.<br />If you wait until the last minute, it may be too late.<br />
  10. 10. Reversed Order<br />In some sentences, the predicate will come before the subject.<br />Examples:<br />Here comesthe football team.<br />Where arethe cheerleaders?<br />
  11. 11. Split Predicate<br />In questions (interrogative sentences), the verb phrase is normally split apart by the subject.<br />Doyou seewhat I see?<br />When willthe football team winanother game?<br />

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