• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
501ferdon needsassessment
 

501ferdon needsassessment

on

  • 183 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
183
Views on SlideShare
183
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    501ferdon needsassessment 501ferdon needsassessment Document Transcript

    • EDTECH 501‐4172 (SU09) Susan Ferdon  Technology Use Needs Assessment ­ Justification  This needs assessment has been created for the school at which I teach, Kipling Elementary School (K‐5) in Deerfield, Illinois. Deerfield is an affluent community with low mobility. Detailed information about Kipling School can be accessed on the Interactive Illinois Report Card website: http://iirc.niu.edu/School.aspx?source=School%20Profile&schoolID=340491090022003&level=S   The school district places a strong emphasis on teaching and learning that is standards‐based, data‐driven, and incorporates current best practice. With that in mind, the following resources were used to guide the selection of survey topics and questions for this needs assessment:  o NETS‐Student (1a,1c, 2a, 2b, 3a, 3b, 3d, 6a, 6b)  o NETS‐Teacher (1a, 1b, 1c, 1d, 2a, 3a, 3c, 5a)  o NETS for Students: Achievement Rubric, grade 5 (1a.1, 1a.3, 1b1, 3a, 3b, 6a, 6b)  http://www.ncrel.org/tech/nets/p‐12rubric.pdf   o No Child Left Behind Act of 2001, Title II, Part D – Enhancing Education Through  Technology. http://www.ed.gov/policy/elsec/leg/esea02/pg34.html   o Technology in Schools: What the Research Says, by Metiri Group.  http://www.cisco.com/web/strategy/docs/education/TechnologyinSchoolsReport. pdf   o An Educators Guide to Evaluating The Use of Technology in Schools and Classrooms at  http://www.ed.gov/pubs/EdTechGuide/ , Appendix C.  o Wisconsin’s Model for Academic Standards for Information and Technology Literacy,  Standard A, 4th grade (p. 4‐5). http://dpi.wi.gov/imt/itlstfst.html   Metiri Group research shows that “in schools with sufficient access (e.g., 1:1 environments, schools with laptops on carts, schools with low student‐to‐computer ratios), the barriers to effective [technology] use are lack of: vision, access to research, leadership, teacher proficiency in integrating technology in learning, professional development, school culture, and/or resources.” Deerfield qualifies as a school with “sufficient access” so I chose to focus this needs assessment on those two areas with the most direct and measureable connections to teacher and student technology use: 1) teacher (and student) proficiency in integrating technology, and 2) professional development.   Section 1: Demographics Personal information was kept at a minimum for privacy as well as help limit survey length. Job assignments, and student contacts per week, will greatly impact how technology is used so that information was included. Standards and rubrics for 4th and 5th grade were used to guide question development so only 4th and 5th grade students will be surveyed. I chose not 
    • to include questions about equipment and Internet access because that data has already been gathered for Kipling and is a matter of public record.  Section 2: Technology Integration – Teacher Use (Technology Use on Student Survey) Survey questions related to school and home use of technology by faculty/staff and students are included on the survey. For students, technology use at school is not within their control since use is most often determined by tasks teachers have assigned. For adults, technology use at school is impacted by the availability of resources and the nature of their job duties. Including questions about home use will provide a clearer picture of technology use, than would be possible with school‐related data only. For faculty/staff and students, survey questions about to school‐related technology use are required; those relating to personal technology use at home are optional.  While some survey questions would be applicable to any school or district, others are tailored specifically to Deerfield, including:   o School Town (http://schooltown.net/) was piloted in two Kipling classrooms in the  2007‐08 school year. In 2008‐09 the pilot program was expanded to include all four  5th grade classrooms.  o Thin Client – District network services are outsourced to Net56 (www.net56.com). All  school computers have Thin Client (network access) installed and most 4th and 5th  grade students have Thin Client downloaded onto their home computers.   o The majority of district goals in the current Technology Integration Plan relate to the  use of blogs, wikis, podcasting, digital storytelling, and United Streaming to support  math and reading instruction, so those technologies were included.  o Kipling teachers have been strongly encouraged to use Audacity and PhotoStory to  address issues of reading fluency, comprehension and sequencing of events.  Section 3: Technology Integration – Student Use (Technology Use on Student Survey) Questions about the quantity of time spent using computers and the Internet will not provide data about the quality and nature of work students complete, but do provide a starting point. Survey data will aid in the identification of gaps between what technologies are currently being used and district goals for future technology use. The next step would be to determine how effectively that technology is being used, which would not be accurately measured using a self‐reporting instrument alone.  Section 4: Professional Development In Deerfield, professional development for technology has been quite limited so data is being collected for both in‐district and out‐of‐district professional development. NCLB, Part D, Section 2402 (5) states: “To enhance the ongoing professional development of teachers, principals, and administrators by providing constant access to training and updated research in teaching and learning through electronic means.” Accordingly, questions relating to faculty/staff attitudes towards a variety of instructional models have been included.