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Practical office politics
 

Practical office politics

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  • On this slide, I typically read of the “bold” sentence for each of the numbers. <br /> Then, I write the numbers 1-6 on a whiteboard and go around the room very quickly polling each member of the class, and writing the results next to the numbers on the whiteboard. Generally, in sessions with middle managers, I find that you’ll see a distribution that is skewed left and fairly thin, centering around 2.5 or 3. There will be a few outliers around 5 so you’ll see a slight bump. I would not yet ask participants “why” they answered the way they did. This will come out on following slides. <br /> Audience may be interested to note that different industries seem to skew in different ways. If you do this for an investment bank crowd, for example, the distribution tends to move right and fatten, reflecting, perhaps, a greater amount of power and politics in the industry. <br /> That said, there seems to be politics everywhere from 3 man shops to 300,000 staff firms and across industries from IT to retail fashion. <br /> Whatever the case, it is important to appreciate diversity in opinion and to agree on slide one that we we recognize our personal assumptions that we bring to the table, but that we should keep an open mind for the rest of the session. <br />
  • On this slide, I typically read of the “bold” sentence for each of the numbers. <br /> Then, I write the numbers 1-6 on a whiteboard and go around the room very quickly polling each member of the class, and writing the results next to the numbers on the whiteboard. Generally, in sessions with middle managers, I find that you’ll see a distribution that is skewed left and fairly thin, centering around 2.5 or 3. There will be a few outliers around 5 so you’ll see a slight bump. I would not yet ask participants “why” they answered the way they did. This will come out on following slides. <br /> Audience may be interested to note that different industries seem to skew in different ways. If you do this for an investment bank crowd, for example, the distribution tends to move right and fatten, reflecting, perhaps, a greater amount of power and politics in the industry. <br /> That said, there seems to be politics everywhere from 3 man shops to 300,000 staff firms and across industries from IT to retail fashion. <br /> Whatever the case, it is important to appreciate diversity in opinion and to agree on slide one that we we recognize our personal assumptions that we bring to the table, but that we should keep an open mind for the rest of the session. <br />
  • On this slide, I typically read of the “bold” sentence for each of the numbers. <br /> Then, I write the numbers 1-6 on a whiteboard and go around the room very quickly polling each member of the class, and writing the results next to the numbers on the whiteboard. Generally, in sessions with middle managers, I find that you’ll see a distribution that is skewed left and fairly thin, centering around 2.5 or 3. There will be a few outliers around 5 so you’ll see a slight bump. I would not yet ask participants “why” they answered the way they did. This will come out on following slides. <br /> Audience may be interested to note that different industries seem to skew in different ways. If you do this for an investment bank crowd, for example, the distribution tends to move right and fatten, reflecting, perhaps, a greater amount of power and politics in the industry. <br /> That said, there seems to be politics everywhere from 3 man shops to 300,000 staff firms and across industries from IT to retail fashion. <br /> Whatever the case, it is important to appreciate diversity in opinion and to agree on slide one that we we recognize our personal assumptions that we bring to the table, but that we should keep an open mind for the rest of the session. <br />
  • On this slide, I typically read of the “bold” sentence for each of the numbers. <br /> Then, I write the numbers 1-6 on a whiteboard and go around the room very quickly polling each member of the class, and writing the results next to the numbers on the whiteboard. Generally, in sessions with middle managers, I find that you’ll see a distribution that is skewed left and fairly thin, centering around 2.5 or 3. There will be a few outliers around 5 so you’ll see a slight bump. I would not yet ask participants “why” they answered the way they did. This will come out on following slides. <br /> Audience may be interested to note that different industries seem to skew in different ways. If you do this for an investment bank crowd, for example, the distribution tends to move right and fatten, reflecting, perhaps, a greater amount of power and politics in the industry. <br /> That said, there seems to be politics everywhere from 3 man shops to 300,000 staff firms and across industries from IT to retail fashion. <br /> Whatever the case, it is important to appreciate diversity in opinion and to agree on slide one that we we recognize our personal assumptions that we bring to the table, but that we should keep an open mind for the rest of the session. <br />
  • On this slide, I typically read of the “bold” sentence for each of the numbers. <br /> Then, I write the numbers 1-6 on a whiteboard and go around the room very quickly polling each member of the class, and writing the results next to the numbers on the whiteboard. Generally, in sessions with middle managers, I find that you’ll see a distribution that is skewed left and fairly thin, centering around 2.5 or 3. There will be a few outliers around 5 so you’ll see a slight bump. I would not yet ask participants “why” they answered the way they did. This will come out on following slides. <br /> Audience may be interested to note that different industries seem to skew in different ways. If you do this for an investment bank crowd, for example, the distribution tends to move right and fatten, reflecting, perhaps, a greater amount of power and politics in the industry. <br /> That said, there seems to be politics everywhere from 3 man shops to 300,000 staff firms and across industries from IT to retail fashion. <br /> Whatever the case, it is important to appreciate diversity in opinion and to agree on slide one that we we recognize our personal assumptions that we bring to the table, but that we should keep an open mind for the rest of the session. <br />
  • On this slide, I typically read of the “bold” sentence for each of the numbers. <br /> Then, I write the numbers 1-6 on a whiteboard and go around the room very quickly polling each member of the class, and writing the results next to the numbers on the whiteboard. Generally, in sessions with middle managers, I find that you’ll see a distribution that is skewed left and fairly thin, centering around 2.5 or 3. There will be a few outliers around 5 so you’ll see a slight bump. I would not yet ask participants “why” they answered the way they did. This will come out on following slides. <br /> Audience may be interested to note that different industries seem to skew in different ways. If you do this for an investment bank crowd, for example, the distribution tends to move right and fatten, reflecting, perhaps, a greater amount of power and politics in the industry. <br /> That said, there seems to be politics everywhere from 3 man shops to 300,000 staff firms and across industries from IT to retail fashion. <br /> Whatever the case, it is important to appreciate diversity in opinion and to agree on slide one that we we recognize our personal assumptions that we bring to the table, but that we should keep an open mind for the rest of the session. <br />
  • On this slide, I typically read of the “bold” sentence for each of the numbers. <br /> Then, I write the numbers 1-6 on a whiteboard and go around the room very quickly polling each member of the class, and writing the results next to the numbers on the whiteboard. Generally, in sessions with middle managers, I find that you’ll see a distribution that is skewed left and fairly thin, centering around 2.5 or 3. There will be a few outliers around 5 so you’ll see a slight bump. I would not yet ask participants “why” they answered the way they did. This will come out on following slides. <br /> Audience may be interested to note that different industries seem to skew in different ways. If you do this for an investment bank crowd, for example, the distribution tends to move right and fatten, reflecting, perhaps, a greater amount of power and politics in the industry. <br /> That said, there seems to be politics everywhere from 3 man shops to 300,000 staff firms and across industries from IT to retail fashion. <br /> Whatever the case, it is important to appreciate diversity in opinion and to agree on slide one that we we recognize our personal assumptions that we bring to the table, but that we should keep an open mind for the rest of the session. <br />
  • On this slide, I typically read of the “bold” sentence for each of the numbers. <br /> Then, I write the numbers 1-6 on a whiteboard and go around the room very quickly polling each member of the class, and writing the results next to the numbers on the whiteboard. Generally, in sessions with middle managers, I find that you’ll see a distribution that is skewed left and fairly thin, centering around 2.5 or 3. There will be a few outliers around 5 so you’ll see a slight bump. I would not yet ask participants “why” they answered the way they did. This will come out on following slides. <br /> Audience may be interested to note that different industries seem to skew in different ways. If you do this for an investment bank crowd, for example, the distribution tends to move right and fatten, reflecting, perhaps, a greater amount of power and politics in the industry. <br /> That said, there seems to be politics everywhere from 3 man shops to 300,000 staff firms and across industries from IT to retail fashion. <br /> Whatever the case, it is important to appreciate diversity in opinion and to agree on slide one that we we recognize our personal assumptions that we bring to the table, but that we should keep an open mind for the rest of the session. <br />
  • On this slide, I typically read of the “bold” sentence for each of the numbers. <br /> Then, I write the numbers 1-6 on a whiteboard and go around the room very quickly polling each member of the class, and writing the results next to the numbers on the whiteboard. Generally, in sessions with middle managers, I find that you’ll see a distribution that is skewed left and fairly thin, centering around 2.5 or 3. There will be a few outliers around 5 so you’ll see a slight bump. I would not yet ask participants “why” they answered the way they did. This will come out on following slides. <br /> Audience may be interested to note that different industries seem to skew in different ways. If you do this for an investment bank crowd, for example, the distribution tends to move right and fatten, reflecting, perhaps, a greater amount of power and politics in the industry. <br /> That said, there seems to be politics everywhere from 3 man shops to 300,000 staff firms and across industries from IT to retail fashion. <br /> Whatever the case, it is important to appreciate diversity in opinion and to agree on slide one that we we recognize our personal assumptions that we bring to the table, but that we should keep an open mind for the rest of the session. <br />
  • On this slide, I typically read of the “bold” sentence for each of the numbers. <br /> Then, I write the numbers 1-6 on a whiteboard and go around the room very quickly polling each member of the class, and writing the results next to the numbers on the whiteboard. Generally, in sessions with middle managers, I find that you’ll see a distribution that is skewed left and fairly thin, centering around 2.5 or 3. There will be a few outliers around 5 so you’ll see a slight bump. I would not yet ask participants “why” they answered the way they did. This will come out on following slides. <br /> Audience may be interested to note that different industries seem to skew in different ways. If you do this for an investment bank crowd, for example, the distribution tends to move right and fatten, reflecting, perhaps, a greater amount of power and politics in the industry. <br /> That said, there seems to be politics everywhere from 3 man shops to 300,000 staff firms and across industries from IT to retail fashion. <br /> Whatever the case, it is important to appreciate diversity in opinion and to agree on slide one that we we recognize our personal assumptions that we bring to the table, but that we should keep an open mind for the rest of the session. <br />
  • On this slide, I typically read of the “bold” sentence for each of the numbers. <br /> Then, I write the numbers 1-6 on a whiteboard and go around the room very quickly polling each member of the class, and writing the results next to the numbers on the whiteboard. Generally, in sessions with middle managers, I find that you’ll see a distribution that is skewed left and fairly thin, centering around 2.5 or 3. There will be a few outliers around 5 so you’ll see a slight bump. I would not yet ask participants “why” they answered the way they did. This will come out on following slides. <br /> Audience may be interested to note that different industries seem to skew in different ways. If you do this for an investment bank crowd, for example, the distribution tends to move right and fatten, reflecting, perhaps, a greater amount of power and politics in the industry. <br /> That said, there seems to be politics everywhere from 3 man shops to 300,000 staff firms and across industries from IT to retail fashion. <br /> Whatever the case, it is important to appreciate diversity in opinion and to agree on slide one that we we recognize our personal assumptions that we bring to the table, but that we should keep an open mind for the rest of the session. <br />
  • On this slide, I typically read of the “bold” sentence for each of the numbers. <br /> Then, I write the numbers 1-6 on a whiteboard and go around the room very quickly polling each member of the class, and writing the results next to the numbers on the whiteboard. Generally, in sessions with middle managers, I find that you’ll see a distribution that is skewed left and fairly thin, centering around 2.5 or 3. There will be a few outliers around 5 so you’ll see a slight bump. I would not yet ask participants “why” they answered the way they did. This will come out on following slides. <br /> Audience may be interested to note that different industries seem to skew in different ways. If you do this for an investment bank crowd, for example, the distribution tends to move right and fatten, reflecting, perhaps, a greater amount of power and politics in the industry. <br /> That said, there seems to be politics everywhere from 3 man shops to 300,000 staff firms and across industries from IT to retail fashion. <br /> Whatever the case, it is important to appreciate diversity in opinion and to agree on slide one that we we recognize our personal assumptions that we bring to the table, but that we should keep an open mind for the rest of the session. <br />
  • On this slide, I typically read of the “bold” sentence for each of the numbers. <br /> Then, I write the numbers 1-6 on a whiteboard and go around the room very quickly polling each member of the class, and writing the results next to the numbers on the whiteboard. Generally, in sessions with middle managers, I find that you’ll see a distribution that is skewed left and fairly thin, centering around 2.5 or 3. There will be a few outliers around 5 so you’ll see a slight bump. I would not yet ask participants “why” they answered the way they did. This will come out on following slides. <br /> Audience may be interested to note that different industries seem to skew in different ways. If you do this for an investment bank crowd, for example, the distribution tends to move right and fatten, reflecting, perhaps, a greater amount of power and politics in the industry. <br /> That said, there seems to be politics everywhere from 3 man shops to 300,000 staff firms and across industries from IT to retail fashion. <br /> Whatever the case, it is important to appreciate diversity in opinion and to agree on slide one that we we recognize our personal assumptions that we bring to the table, but that we should keep an open mind for the rest of the session. <br />
  • On this slide, I typically read of the “bold” sentence for each of the numbers. <br /> Then, I write the numbers 1-6 on a whiteboard and go around the room very quickly polling each member of the class, and writing the results next to the numbers on the whiteboard. Generally, in sessions with middle managers, I find that you’ll see a distribution that is skewed left and fairly thin, centering around 2.5 or 3. There will be a few outliers around 5 so you’ll see a slight bump. I would not yet ask participants “why” they answered the way they did. This will come out on following slides. <br /> Audience may be interested to note that different industries seem to skew in different ways. If you do this for an investment bank crowd, for example, the distribution tends to move right and fatten, reflecting, perhaps, a greater amount of power and politics in the industry. <br /> That said, there seems to be politics everywhere from 3 man shops to 300,000 staff firms and across industries from IT to retail fashion. <br /> Whatever the case, it is important to appreciate diversity in opinion and to agree on slide one that we we recognize our personal assumptions that we bring to the table, but that we should keep an open mind for the rest of the session. <br />
  • On this slide, I typically read of the “bold” sentence for each of the numbers. <br /> Then, I write the numbers 1-6 on a whiteboard and go around the room very quickly polling each member of the class, and writing the results next to the numbers on the whiteboard. Generally, in sessions with middle managers, I find that you’ll see a distribution that is skewed left and fairly thin, centering around 2.5 or 3. There will be a few outliers around 5 so you’ll see a slight bump. I would not yet ask participants “why” they answered the way they did. This will come out on following slides. <br /> Audience may be interested to note that different industries seem to skew in different ways. If you do this for an investment bank crowd, for example, the distribution tends to move right and fatten, reflecting, perhaps, a greater amount of power and politics in the industry. <br /> That said, there seems to be politics everywhere from 3 man shops to 300,000 staff firms and across industries from IT to retail fashion. <br /> Whatever the case, it is important to appreciate diversity in opinion and to agree on slide one that we we recognize our personal assumptions that we bring to the table, but that we should keep an open mind for the rest of the session. <br />
  • On this slide, I typically read of the “bold” sentence for each of the numbers. <br /> Then, I write the numbers 1-6 on a whiteboard and go around the room very quickly polling each member of the class, and writing the results next to the numbers on the whiteboard. Generally, in sessions with middle managers, I find that you’ll see a distribution that is skewed left and fairly thin, centering around 2.5 or 3. There will be a few outliers around 5 so you’ll see a slight bump. I would not yet ask participants “why” they answered the way they did. This will come out on following slides. <br /> Audience may be interested to note that different industries seem to skew in different ways. If you do this for an investment bank crowd, for example, the distribution tends to move right and fatten, reflecting, perhaps, a greater amount of power and politics in the industry. <br /> That said, there seems to be politics everywhere from 3 man shops to 300,000 staff firms and across industries from IT to retail fashion. <br /> Whatever the case, it is important to appreciate diversity in opinion and to agree on slide one that we we recognize our personal assumptions that we bring to the table, but that we should keep an open mind for the rest of the session. <br />
  • On this slide, I typically read of the “bold” sentence for each of the numbers. <br /> Then, I write the numbers 1-6 on a whiteboard and go around the room very quickly polling each member of the class, and writing the results next to the numbers on the whiteboard. Generally, in sessions with middle managers, I find that you’ll see a distribution that is skewed left and fairly thin, centering around 2.5 or 3. There will be a few outliers around 5 so you’ll see a slight bump. I would not yet ask participants “why” they answered the way they did. This will come out on following slides. <br /> Audience may be interested to note that different industries seem to skew in different ways. If you do this for an investment bank crowd, for example, the distribution tends to move right and fatten, reflecting, perhaps, a greater amount of power and politics in the industry. <br /> That said, there seems to be politics everywhere from 3 man shops to 300,000 staff firms and across industries from IT to retail fashion. <br /> Whatever the case, it is important to appreciate diversity in opinion and to agree on slide one that we we recognize our personal assumptions that we bring to the table, but that we should keep an open mind for the rest of the session. <br />
  • On this slide, I typically read of the “bold” sentence for each of the numbers. <br /> Then, I write the numbers 1-6 on a whiteboard and go around the room very quickly polling each member of the class, and writing the results next to the numbers on the whiteboard. Generally, in sessions with middle managers, I find that you’ll see a distribution that is skewed left and fairly thin, centering around 2.5 or 3. There will be a few outliers around 5 so you’ll see a slight bump. I would not yet ask participants “why” they answered the way they did. This will come out on following slides. <br /> Audience may be interested to note that different industries seem to skew in different ways. If you do this for an investment bank crowd, for example, the distribution tends to move right and fatten, reflecting, perhaps, a greater amount of power and politics in the industry. <br /> That said, there seems to be politics everywhere from 3 man shops to 300,000 staff firms and across industries from IT to retail fashion. <br /> Whatever the case, it is important to appreciate diversity in opinion and to agree on slide one that we we recognize our personal assumptions that we bring to the table, but that we should keep an open mind for the rest of the session. <br />
  • On this slide, I typically read of the “bold” sentence for each of the numbers. <br /> Then, I write the numbers 1-6 on a whiteboard and go around the room very quickly polling each member of the class, and writing the results next to the numbers on the whiteboard. Generally, in sessions with middle managers, I find that you’ll see a distribution that is skewed left and fairly thin, centering around 2.5 or 3. There will be a few outliers around 5 so you’ll see a slight bump. I would not yet ask participants “why” they answered the way they did. This will come out on following slides. <br /> Audience may be interested to note that different industries seem to skew in different ways. If you do this for an investment bank crowd, for example, the distribution tends to move right and fatten, reflecting, perhaps, a greater amount of power and politics in the industry. <br /> That said, there seems to be politics everywhere from 3 man shops to 300,000 staff firms and across industries from IT to retail fashion. <br /> Whatever the case, it is important to appreciate diversity in opinion and to agree on slide one that we we recognize our personal assumptions that we bring to the table, but that we should keep an open mind for the rest of the session. <br />
  • On this slide, I typically read of the “bold” sentence for each of the numbers. <br /> Then, I write the numbers 1-6 on a whiteboard and go around the room very quickly polling each member of the class, and writing the results next to the numbers on the whiteboard. Generally, in sessions with middle managers, I find that you’ll see a distribution that is skewed left and fairly thin, centering around 2.5 or 3. There will be a few outliers around 5 so you’ll see a slight bump. I would not yet ask participants “why” they answered the way they did. This will come out on following slides. <br /> Audience may be interested to note that different industries seem to skew in different ways. If you do this for an investment bank crowd, for example, the distribution tends to move right and fatten, reflecting, perhaps, a greater amount of power and politics in the industry. <br /> That said, there seems to be politics everywhere from 3 man shops to 300,000 staff firms and across industries from IT to retail fashion. <br /> Whatever the case, it is important to appreciate diversity in opinion and to agree on slide one that we we recognize our personal assumptions that we bring to the table, but that we should keep an open mind for the rest of the session. <br />
  • On this slide, I typically read of the “bold” sentence for each of the numbers. <br /> Then, I write the numbers 1-6 on a whiteboard and go around the room very quickly polling each member of the class, and writing the results next to the numbers on the whiteboard. Generally, in sessions with middle managers, I find that you’ll see a distribution that is skewed left and fairly thin, centering around 2.5 or 3. There will be a few outliers around 5 so you’ll see a slight bump. I would not yet ask participants “why” they answered the way they did. This will come out on following slides. <br /> Audience may be interested to note that different industries seem to skew in different ways. If you do this for an investment bank crowd, for example, the distribution tends to move right and fatten, reflecting, perhaps, a greater amount of power and politics in the industry. <br /> That said, there seems to be politics everywhere from 3 man shops to 300,000 staff firms and across industries from IT to retail fashion. <br /> Whatever the case, it is important to appreciate diversity in opinion and to agree on slide one that we we recognize our personal assumptions that we bring to the table, but that we should keep an open mind for the rest of the session. <br />
  • On this slide, I typically read of the “bold” sentence for each of the numbers. <br /> Then, I write the numbers 1-6 on a whiteboard and go around the room very quickly polling each member of the class, and writing the results next to the numbers on the whiteboard. Generally, in sessions with middle managers, I find that you’ll see a distribution that is skewed left and fairly thin, centering around 2.5 or 3. There will be a few outliers around 5 so you’ll see a slight bump. I would not yet ask participants “why” they answered the way they did. This will come out on following slides. <br /> Audience may be interested to note that different industries seem to skew in different ways. If you do this for an investment bank crowd, for example, the distribution tends to move right and fatten, reflecting, perhaps, a greater amount of power and politics in the industry. <br /> That said, there seems to be politics everywhere from 3 man shops to 300,000 staff firms and across industries from IT to retail fashion. <br /> Whatever the case, it is important to appreciate diversity in opinion and to agree on slide one that we we recognize our personal assumptions that we bring to the table, but that we should keep an open mind for the rest of the session. <br />
  • On this slide, I typically read of the “bold” sentence for each of the numbers. <br /> Then, I write the numbers 1-6 on a whiteboard and go around the room very quickly polling each member of the class, and writing the results next to the numbers on the whiteboard. Generally, in sessions with middle managers, I find that you’ll see a distribution that is skewed left and fairly thin, centering around 2.5 or 3. There will be a few outliers around 5 so you’ll see a slight bump. I would not yet ask participants “why” they answered the way they did. This will come out on following slides. <br /> Audience may be interested to note that different industries seem to skew in different ways. If you do this for an investment bank crowd, for example, the distribution tends to move right and fatten, reflecting, perhaps, a greater amount of power and politics in the industry. <br /> That said, there seems to be politics everywhere from 3 man shops to 300,000 staff firms and across industries from IT to retail fashion. <br /> Whatever the case, it is important to appreciate diversity in opinion and to agree on slide one that we we recognize our personal assumptions that we bring to the table, but that we should keep an open mind for the rest of the session. <br />
  • On this slide, I typically read of the “bold” sentence for each of the numbers. <br /> Then, I write the numbers 1-6 on a whiteboard and go around the room very quickly polling each member of the class, and writing the results next to the numbers on the whiteboard. Generally, in sessions with middle managers, I find that you’ll see a distribution that is skewed left and fairly thin, centering around 2.5 or 3. There will be a few outliers around 5 so you’ll see a slight bump. I would not yet ask participants “why” they answered the way they did. This will come out on following slides. <br /> Audience may be interested to note that different industries seem to skew in different ways. If you do this for an investment bank crowd, for example, the distribution tends to move right and fatten, reflecting, perhaps, a greater amount of power and politics in the industry. <br /> That said, there seems to be politics everywhere from 3 man shops to 300,000 staff firms and across industries from IT to retail fashion. <br /> Whatever the case, it is important to appreciate diversity in opinion and to agree on slide one that we we recognize our personal assumptions that we bring to the table, but that we should keep an open mind for the rest of the session. <br />
  • On this slide, I typically read of the “bold” sentence for each of the numbers. <br /> Then, I write the numbers 1-6 on a whiteboard and go around the room very quickly polling each member of the class, and writing the results next to the numbers on the whiteboard. Generally, in sessions with middle managers, I find that you’ll see a distribution that is skewed left and fairly thin, centering around 2.5 or 3. There will be a few outliers around 5 so you’ll see a slight bump. I would not yet ask participants “why” they answered the way they did. This will come out on following slides. <br /> Audience may be interested to note that different industries seem to skew in different ways. If you do this for an investment bank crowd, for example, the distribution tends to move right and fatten, reflecting, perhaps, a greater amount of power and politics in the industry. <br /> That said, there seems to be politics everywhere from 3 man shops to 300,000 staff firms and across industries from IT to retail fashion. <br /> Whatever the case, it is important to appreciate diversity in opinion and to agree on slide one that we we recognize our personal assumptions that we bring to the table, but that we should keep an open mind for the rest of the session. <br />
  • On this slide, I typically read of the “bold” sentence for each of the numbers. <br /> Then, I write the numbers 1-6 on a whiteboard and go around the room very quickly polling each member of the class, and writing the results next to the numbers on the whiteboard. Generally, in sessions with middle managers, I find that you’ll see a distribution that is skewed left and fairly thin, centering around 2.5 or 3. There will be a few outliers around 5 so you’ll see a slight bump. I would not yet ask participants “why” they answered the way they did. This will come out on following slides. <br /> Audience may be interested to note that different industries seem to skew in different ways. If you do this for an investment bank crowd, for example, the distribution tends to move right and fatten, reflecting, perhaps, a greater amount of power and politics in the industry. <br /> That said, there seems to be politics everywhere from 3 man shops to 300,000 staff firms and across industries from IT to retail fashion. <br /> Whatever the case, it is important to appreciate diversity in opinion and to agree on slide one that we we recognize our personal assumptions that we bring to the table, but that we should keep an open mind for the rest of the session. <br />
  • On this slide, I typically read of the “bold” sentence for each of the numbers. <br /> Then, I write the numbers 1-6 on a whiteboard and go around the room very quickly polling each member of the class, and writing the results next to the numbers on the whiteboard. Generally, in sessions with middle managers, I find that you’ll see a distribution that is skewed left and fairly thin, centering around 2.5 or 3. There will be a few outliers around 5 so you’ll see a slight bump. I would not yet ask participants “why” they answered the way they did. This will come out on following slides. <br /> Audience may be interested to note that different industries seem to skew in different ways. If you do this for an investment bank crowd, for example, the distribution tends to move right and fatten, reflecting, perhaps, a greater amount of power and politics in the industry. <br /> That said, there seems to be politics everywhere from 3 man shops to 300,000 staff firms and across industries from IT to retail fashion. <br /> Whatever the case, it is important to appreciate diversity in opinion and to agree on slide one that we we recognize our personal assumptions that we bring to the table, but that we should keep an open mind for the rest of the session. <br />
  • On this slide, I typically read of the “bold” sentence for each of the numbers. <br /> Then, I write the numbers 1-6 on a whiteboard and go around the room very quickly polling each member of the class, and writing the results next to the numbers on the whiteboard. Generally, in sessions with middle managers, I find that you’ll see a distribution that is skewed left and fairly thin, centering around 2.5 or 3. There will be a few outliers around 5 so you’ll see a slight bump. I would not yet ask participants “why” they answered the way they did. This will come out on following slides. <br /> Audience may be interested to note that different industries seem to skew in different ways. If you do this for an investment bank crowd, for example, the distribution tends to move right and fatten, reflecting, perhaps, a greater amount of power and politics in the industry. <br /> That said, there seems to be politics everywhere from 3 man shops to 300,000 staff firms and across industries from IT to retail fashion. <br /> Whatever the case, it is important to appreciate diversity in opinion and to agree on slide one that we we recognize our personal assumptions that we bring to the table, but that we should keep an open mind for the rest of the session. <br />
  • On this slide, I typically read of the “bold” sentence for each of the numbers. <br /> Then, I write the numbers 1-6 on a whiteboard and go around the room very quickly polling each member of the class, and writing the results next to the numbers on the whiteboard. Generally, in sessions with middle managers, I find that you’ll see a distribution that is skewed left and fairly thin, centering around 2.5 or 3. There will be a few outliers around 5 so you’ll see a slight bump. I would not yet ask participants “why” they answered the way they did. This will come out on following slides. <br /> Audience may be interested to note that different industries seem to skew in different ways. If you do this for an investment bank crowd, for example, the distribution tends to move right and fatten, reflecting, perhaps, a greater amount of power and politics in the industry. <br /> That said, there seems to be politics everywhere from 3 man shops to 300,000 staff firms and across industries from IT to retail fashion. <br /> Whatever the case, it is important to appreciate diversity in opinion and to agree on slide one that we we recognize our personal assumptions that we bring to the table, but that we should keep an open mind for the rest of the session. <br />
  • On this slide, I typically read of the “bold” sentence for each of the numbers. <br /> Then, I write the numbers 1-6 on a whiteboard and go around the room very quickly polling each member of the class, and writing the results next to the numbers on the whiteboard. Generally, in sessions with middle managers, I find that you’ll see a distribution that is skewed left and fairly thin, centering around 2.5 or 3. There will be a few outliers around 5 so you’ll see a slight bump. I would not yet ask participants “why” they answered the way they did. This will come out on following slides. <br /> Audience may be interested to note that different industries seem to skew in different ways. If you do this for an investment bank crowd, for example, the distribution tends to move right and fatten, reflecting, perhaps, a greater amount of power and politics in the industry. <br /> That said, there seems to be politics everywhere from 3 man shops to 300,000 staff firms and across industries from IT to retail fashion. <br /> Whatever the case, it is important to appreciate diversity in opinion and to agree on slide one that we we recognize our personal assumptions that we bring to the table, but that we should keep an open mind for the rest of the session. <br />
  • On this slide, I typically read of the “bold” sentence for each of the numbers. <br /> Then, I write the numbers 1-6 on a whiteboard and go around the room very quickly polling each member of the class, and writing the results next to the numbers on the whiteboard. Generally, in sessions with middle managers, I find that you’ll see a distribution that is skewed left and fairly thin, centering around 2.5 or 3. There will be a few outliers around 5 so you’ll see a slight bump. I would not yet ask participants “why” they answered the way they did. This will come out on following slides. <br /> Audience may be interested to note that different industries seem to skew in different ways. If you do this for an investment bank crowd, for example, the distribution tends to move right and fatten, reflecting, perhaps, a greater amount of power and politics in the industry. <br /> That said, there seems to be politics everywhere from 3 man shops to 300,000 staff firms and across industries from IT to retail fashion. <br /> Whatever the case, it is important to appreciate diversity in opinion and to agree on slide one that we we recognize our personal assumptions that we bring to the table, but that we should keep an open mind for the rest of the session. <br />
  • On this slide, I typically read of the “bold” sentence for each of the numbers. <br /> Then, I write the numbers 1-6 on a whiteboard and go around the room very quickly polling each member of the class, and writing the results next to the numbers on the whiteboard. Generally, in sessions with middle managers, I find that you’ll see a distribution that is skewed left and fairly thin, centering around 2.5 or 3. There will be a few outliers around 5 so you’ll see a slight bump. I would not yet ask participants “why” they answered the way they did. This will come out on following slides. <br /> Audience may be interested to note that different industries seem to skew in different ways. If you do this for an investment bank crowd, for example, the distribution tends to move right and fatten, reflecting, perhaps, a greater amount of power and politics in the industry. <br /> That said, there seems to be politics everywhere from 3 man shops to 300,000 staff firms and across industries from IT to retail fashion. <br /> Whatever the case, it is important to appreciate diversity in opinion and to agree on slide one that we we recognize our personal assumptions that we bring to the table, but that we should keep an open mind for the rest of the session. <br />
  • On this slide, I typically read of the “bold” sentence for each of the numbers. <br /> Then, I write the numbers 1-6 on a whiteboard and go around the room very quickly polling each member of the class, and writing the results next to the numbers on the whiteboard. Generally, in sessions with middle managers, I find that you’ll see a distribution that is skewed left and fairly thin, centering around 2.5 or 3. There will be a few outliers around 5 so you’ll see a slight bump. I would not yet ask participants “why” they answered the way they did. This will come out on following slides. <br /> Audience may be interested to note that different industries seem to skew in different ways. If you do this for an investment bank crowd, for example, the distribution tends to move right and fatten, reflecting, perhaps, a greater amount of power and politics in the industry. <br /> That said, there seems to be politics everywhere from 3 man shops to 300,000 staff firms and across industries from IT to retail fashion. <br /> Whatever the case, it is important to appreciate diversity in opinion and to agree on slide one that we we recognize our personal assumptions that we bring to the table, but that we should keep an open mind for the rest of the session. <br />
  • On this slide, I typically read of the “bold” sentence for each of the numbers. <br /> Then, I write the numbers 1-6 on a whiteboard and go around the room very quickly polling each member of the class, and writing the results next to the numbers on the whiteboard. Generally, in sessions with middle managers, I find that you’ll see a distribution that is skewed left and fairly thin, centering around 2.5 or 3. There will be a few outliers around 5 so you’ll see a slight bump. I would not yet ask participants “why” they answered the way they did. This will come out on following slides. <br /> Audience may be interested to note that different industries seem to skew in different ways. If you do this for an investment bank crowd, for example, the distribution tends to move right and fatten, reflecting, perhaps, a greater amount of power and politics in the industry. <br /> That said, there seems to be politics everywhere from 3 man shops to 300,000 staff firms and across industries from IT to retail fashion. <br /> Whatever the case, it is important to appreciate diversity in opinion and to agree on slide one that we we recognize our personal assumptions that we bring to the table, but that we should keep an open mind for the rest of the session. <br />
  • On this slide, I typically read of the “bold” sentence for each of the numbers. <br /> Then, I write the numbers 1-6 on a whiteboard and go around the room very quickly polling each member of the class, and writing the results next to the numbers on the whiteboard. Generally, in sessions with middle managers, I find that you’ll see a distribution that is skewed left and fairly thin, centering around 2.5 or 3. There will be a few outliers around 5 so you’ll see a slight bump. I would not yet ask participants “why” they answered the way they did. This will come out on following slides. <br /> Audience may be interested to note that different industries seem to skew in different ways. If you do this for an investment bank crowd, for example, the distribution tends to move right and fatten, reflecting, perhaps, a greater amount of power and politics in the industry. <br /> That said, there seems to be politics everywhere from 3 man shops to 300,000 staff firms and across industries from IT to retail fashion. <br /> Whatever the case, it is important to appreciate diversity in opinion and to agree on slide one that we we recognize our personal assumptions that we bring to the table, but that we should keep an open mind for the rest of the session. <br />
  • On this slide, I typically read of the “bold” sentence for each of the numbers. <br /> Then, I write the numbers 1-6 on a whiteboard and go around the room very quickly polling each member of the class, and writing the results next to the numbers on the whiteboard. Generally, in sessions with middle managers, I find that you’ll see a distribution that is skewed left and fairly thin, centering around 2.5 or 3. There will be a few outliers around 5 so you’ll see a slight bump. I would not yet ask participants “why” they answered the way they did. This will come out on following slides. <br /> Audience may be interested to note that different industries seem to skew in different ways. If you do this for an investment bank crowd, for example, the distribution tends to move right and fatten, reflecting, perhaps, a greater amount of power and politics in the industry. <br /> That said, there seems to be politics everywhere from 3 man shops to 300,000 staff firms and across industries from IT to retail fashion. <br /> Whatever the case, it is important to appreciate diversity in opinion and to agree on slide one that we we recognize our personal assumptions that we bring to the table, but that we should keep an open mind for the rest of the session. <br />
  • On this slide, I typically read of the “bold” sentence for each of the numbers. <br /> Then, I write the numbers 1-6 on a whiteboard and go around the room very quickly polling each member of the class, and writing the results next to the numbers on the whiteboard. Generally, in sessions with middle managers, I find that you’ll see a distribution that is skewed left and fairly thin, centering around 2.5 or 3. There will be a few outliers around 5 so you’ll see a slight bump. I would not yet ask participants “why” they answered the way they did. This will come out on following slides. <br /> Audience may be interested to note that different industries seem to skew in different ways. If you do this for an investment bank crowd, for example, the distribution tends to move right and fatten, reflecting, perhaps, a greater amount of power and politics in the industry. <br /> That said, there seems to be politics everywhere from 3 man shops to 300,000 staff firms and across industries from IT to retail fashion. <br /> Whatever the case, it is important to appreciate diversity in opinion and to agree on slide one that we we recognize our personal assumptions that we bring to the table, but that we should keep an open mind for the rest of the session. <br />
  • On this slide, I typically read of the “bold” sentence for each of the numbers. <br /> Then, I write the numbers 1-6 on a whiteboard and go around the room very quickly polling each member of the class, and writing the results next to the numbers on the whiteboard. Generally, in sessions with middle managers, I find that you’ll see a distribution that is skewed left and fairly thin, centering around 2.5 or 3. There will be a few outliers around 5 so you’ll see a slight bump. I would not yet ask participants “why” they answered the way they did. This will come out on following slides. <br /> Audience may be interested to note that different industries seem to skew in different ways. If you do this for an investment bank crowd, for example, the distribution tends to move right and fatten, reflecting, perhaps, a greater amount of power and politics in the industry. <br /> That said, there seems to be politics everywhere from 3 man shops to 300,000 staff firms and across industries from IT to retail fashion. <br /> Whatever the case, it is important to appreciate diversity in opinion and to agree on slide one that we we recognize our personal assumptions that we bring to the table, but that we should keep an open mind for the rest of the session. <br />
  • On this slide, I typically read of the “bold” sentence for each of the numbers. <br /> Then, I write the numbers 1-6 on a whiteboard and go around the room very quickly polling each member of the class, and writing the results next to the numbers on the whiteboard. Generally, in sessions with middle managers, I find that you’ll see a distribution that is skewed left and fairly thin, centering around 2.5 or 3. There will be a few outliers around 5 so you’ll see a slight bump. I would not yet ask participants “why” they answered the way they did. This will come out on following slides. <br /> Audience may be interested to note that different industries seem to skew in different ways. If you do this for an investment bank crowd, for example, the distribution tends to move right and fatten, reflecting, perhaps, a greater amount of power and politics in the industry. <br /> That said, there seems to be politics everywhere from 3 man shops to 300,000 staff firms and across industries from IT to retail fashion. <br /> Whatever the case, it is important to appreciate diversity in opinion and to agree on slide one that we we recognize our personal assumptions that we bring to the table, but that we should keep an open mind for the rest of the session. <br />
  • On this slide, I typically read of the “bold” sentence for each of the numbers. <br /> Then, I write the numbers 1-6 on a whiteboard and go around the room very quickly polling each member of the class, and writing the results next to the numbers on the whiteboard. Generally, in sessions with middle managers, I find that you’ll see a distribution that is skewed left and fairly thin, centering around 2.5 or 3. There will be a few outliers around 5 so you’ll see a slight bump. I would not yet ask participants “why” they answered the way they did. This will come out on following slides. <br /> Audience may be interested to note that different industries seem to skew in different ways. If you do this for an investment bank crowd, for example, the distribution tends to move right and fatten, reflecting, perhaps, a greater amount of power and politics in the industry. <br /> That said, there seems to be politics everywhere from 3 man shops to 300,000 staff firms and across industries from IT to retail fashion. <br /> Whatever the case, it is important to appreciate diversity in opinion and to agree on slide one that we we recognize our personal assumptions that we bring to the table, but that we should keep an open mind for the rest of the session. <br />
  • On this slide, I typically read of the “bold” sentence for each of the numbers. <br /> Then, I write the numbers 1-6 on a whiteboard and go around the room very quickly polling each member of the class, and writing the results next to the numbers on the whiteboard. Generally, in sessions with middle managers, I find that you’ll see a distribution that is skewed left and fairly thin, centering around 2.5 or 3. There will be a few outliers around 5 so you’ll see a slight bump. I would not yet ask participants “why” they answered the way they did. This will come out on following slides. <br /> Audience may be interested to note that different industries seem to skew in different ways. If you do this for an investment bank crowd, for example, the distribution tends to move right and fatten, reflecting, perhaps, a greater amount of power and politics in the industry. <br /> That said, there seems to be politics everywhere from 3 man shops to 300,000 staff firms and across industries from IT to retail fashion. <br /> Whatever the case, it is important to appreciate diversity in opinion and to agree on slide one that we we recognize our personal assumptions that we bring to the table, but that we should keep an open mind for the rest of the session. <br />
  • On this slide, I typically read of the “bold” sentence for each of the numbers. <br /> Then, I write the numbers 1-6 on a whiteboard and go around the room very quickly polling each member of the class, and writing the results next to the numbers on the whiteboard. Generally, in sessions with middle managers, I find that you’ll see a distribution that is skewed left and fairly thin, centering around 2.5 or 3. There will be a few outliers around 5 so you’ll see a slight bump. I would not yet ask participants “why” they answered the way they did. This will come out on following slides. <br /> Audience may be interested to note that different industries seem to skew in different ways. If you do this for an investment bank crowd, for example, the distribution tends to move right and fatten, reflecting, perhaps, a greater amount of power and politics in the industry. <br /> That said, there seems to be politics everywhere from 3 man shops to 300,000 staff firms and across industries from IT to retail fashion. <br /> Whatever the case, it is important to appreciate diversity in opinion and to agree on slide one that we we recognize our personal assumptions that we bring to the table, but that we should keep an open mind for the rest of the session. <br />
  • On this slide, I typically read of the “bold” sentence for each of the numbers. <br /> Then, I write the numbers 1-6 on a whiteboard and go around the room very quickly polling each member of the class, and writing the results next to the numbers on the whiteboard. Generally, in sessions with middle managers, I find that you’ll see a distribution that is skewed left and fairly thin, centering around 2.5 or 3. There will be a few outliers around 5 so you’ll see a slight bump. I would not yet ask participants “why” they answered the way they did. This will come out on following slides. <br /> Audience may be interested to note that different industries seem to skew in different ways. If you do this for an investment bank crowd, for example, the distribution tends to move right and fatten, reflecting, perhaps, a greater amount of power and politics in the industry. <br /> That said, there seems to be politics everywhere from 3 man shops to 300,000 staff firms and across industries from IT to retail fashion. <br /> Whatever the case, it is important to appreciate diversity in opinion and to agree on slide one that we we recognize our personal assumptions that we bring to the table, but that we should keep an open mind for the rest of the session. <br />
  • On this slide, I typically read of the “bold” sentence for each of the numbers. <br /> Then, I write the numbers 1-6 on a whiteboard and go around the room very quickly polling each member of the class, and writing the results next to the numbers on the whiteboard. Generally, in sessions with middle managers, I find that you’ll see a distribution that is skewed left and fairly thin, centering around 2.5 or 3. There will be a few outliers around 5 so you’ll see a slight bump. I would not yet ask participants “why” they answered the way they did. This will come out on following slides. <br /> Audience may be interested to note that different industries seem to skew in different ways. If you do this for an investment bank crowd, for example, the distribution tends to move right and fatten, reflecting, perhaps, a greater amount of power and politics in the industry. <br /> That said, there seems to be politics everywhere from 3 man shops to 300,000 staff firms and across industries from IT to retail fashion. <br /> Whatever the case, it is important to appreciate diversity in opinion and to agree on slide one that we we recognize our personal assumptions that we bring to the table, but that we should keep an open mind for the rest of the session. <br />
  • On this slide, I typically read of the “bold” sentence for each of the numbers. <br /> Then, I write the numbers 1-6 on a whiteboard and go around the room very quickly polling each member of the class, and writing the results next to the numbers on the whiteboard. Generally, in sessions with middle managers, I find that you’ll see a distribution that is skewed left and fairly thin, centering around 2.5 or 3. There will be a few outliers around 5 so you’ll see a slight bump. I would not yet ask participants “why” they answered the way they did. This will come out on following slides. <br /> Audience may be interested to note that different industries seem to skew in different ways. If you do this for an investment bank crowd, for example, the distribution tends to move right and fatten, reflecting, perhaps, a greater amount of power and politics in the industry. <br /> That said, there seems to be politics everywhere from 3 man shops to 300,000 staff firms and across industries from IT to retail fashion. <br /> Whatever the case, it is important to appreciate diversity in opinion and to agree on slide one that we we recognize our personal assumptions that we bring to the table, but that we should keep an open mind for the rest of the session. <br />
  • On this slide, I typically read of the “bold” sentence for each of the numbers. <br /> Then, I write the numbers 1-6 on a whiteboard and go around the room very quickly polling each member of the class, and writing the results next to the numbers on the whiteboard. Generally, in sessions with middle managers, I find that you’ll see a distribution that is skewed left and fairly thin, centering around 2.5 or 3. There will be a few outliers around 5 so you’ll see a slight bump. I would not yet ask participants “why” they answered the way they did. This will come out on following slides. <br /> Audience may be interested to note that different industries seem to skew in different ways. If you do this for an investment bank crowd, for example, the distribution tends to move right and fatten, reflecting, perhaps, a greater amount of power and politics in the industry. <br /> That said, there seems to be politics everywhere from 3 man shops to 300,000 staff firms and across industries from IT to retail fashion. <br /> Whatever the case, it is important to appreciate diversity in opinion and to agree on slide one that we we recognize our personal assumptions that we bring to the table, but that we should keep an open mind for the rest of the session. <br />
  • On this slide, I typically read of the “bold” sentence for each of the numbers. <br /> Then, I write the numbers 1-6 on a whiteboard and go around the room very quickly polling each member of the class, and writing the results next to the numbers on the whiteboard. Generally, in sessions with middle managers, I find that you’ll see a distribution that is skewed left and fairly thin, centering around 2.5 or 3. There will be a few outliers around 5 so you’ll see a slight bump. I would not yet ask participants “why” they answered the way they did. This will come out on following slides. <br /> Audience may be interested to note that different industries seem to skew in different ways. If you do this for an investment bank crowd, for example, the distribution tends to move right and fatten, reflecting, perhaps, a greater amount of power and politics in the industry. <br /> That said, there seems to be politics everywhere from 3 man shops to 300,000 staff firms and across industries from IT to retail fashion. <br /> Whatever the case, it is important to appreciate diversity in opinion and to agree on slide one that we we recognize our personal assumptions that we bring to the table, but that we should keep an open mind for the rest of the session. <br />
  • On this slide, I typically read of the “bold” sentence for each of the numbers. <br /> Then, I write the numbers 1-6 on a whiteboard and go around the room very quickly polling each member of the class, and writing the results next to the numbers on the whiteboard. Generally, in sessions with middle managers, I find that you’ll see a distribution that is skewed left and fairly thin, centering around 2.5 or 3. There will be a few outliers around 5 so you’ll see a slight bump. I would not yet ask participants “why” they answered the way they did. This will come out on following slides. <br /> Audience may be interested to note that different industries seem to skew in different ways. If you do this for an investment bank crowd, for example, the distribution tends to move right and fatten, reflecting, perhaps, a greater amount of power and politics in the industry. <br /> That said, there seems to be politics everywhere from 3 man shops to 300,000 staff firms and across industries from IT to retail fashion. <br /> Whatever the case, it is important to appreciate diversity in opinion and to agree on slide one that we we recognize our personal assumptions that we bring to the table, but that we should keep an open mind for the rest of the session. <br />
  • On this slide, I typically read of the “bold” sentence for each of the numbers. <br /> Then, I write the numbers 1-6 on a whiteboard and go around the room very quickly polling each member of the class, and writing the results next to the numbers on the whiteboard. Generally, in sessions with middle managers, I find that you’ll see a distribution that is skewed left and fairly thin, centering around 2.5 or 3. There will be a few outliers around 5 so you’ll see a slight bump. I would not yet ask participants “why” they answered the way they did. This will come out on following slides. <br /> Audience may be interested to note that different industries seem to skew in different ways. If you do this for an investment bank crowd, for example, the distribution tends to move right and fatten, reflecting, perhaps, a greater amount of power and politics in the industry. <br /> That said, there seems to be politics everywhere from 3 man shops to 300,000 staff firms and across industries from IT to retail fashion. <br /> Whatever the case, it is important to appreciate diversity in opinion and to agree on slide one that we we recognize our personal assumptions that we bring to the table, but that we should keep an open mind for the rest of the session. <br />
  • On this slide, I typically read of the “bold” sentence for each of the numbers. <br /> Then, I write the numbers 1-6 on a whiteboard and go around the room very quickly polling each member of the class, and writing the results next to the numbers on the whiteboard. Generally, in sessions with middle managers, I find that you’ll see a distribution that is skewed left and fairly thin, centering around 2.5 or 3. There will be a few outliers around 5 so you’ll see a slight bump. I would not yet ask participants “why” they answered the way they did. This will come out on following slides. <br /> Audience may be interested to note that different industries seem to skew in different ways. If you do this for an investment bank crowd, for example, the distribution tends to move right and fatten, reflecting, perhaps, a greater amount of power and politics in the industry. <br /> That said, there seems to be politics everywhere from 3 man shops to 300,000 staff firms and across industries from IT to retail fashion. <br /> Whatever the case, it is important to appreciate diversity in opinion and to agree on slide one that we we recognize our personal assumptions that we bring to the table, but that we should keep an open mind for the rest of the session. <br />
  • On this slide, I typically read of the “bold” sentence for each of the numbers. <br /> Then, I write the numbers 1-6 on a whiteboard and go around the room very quickly polling each member of the class, and writing the results next to the numbers on the whiteboard. Generally, in sessions with middle managers, I find that you’ll see a distribution that is skewed left and fairly thin, centering around 2.5 or 3. There will be a few outliers around 5 so you’ll see a slight bump. I would not yet ask participants “why” they answered the way they did. This will come out on following slides. <br /> Audience may be interested to note that different industries seem to skew in different ways. If you do this for an investment bank crowd, for example, the distribution tends to move right and fatten, reflecting, perhaps, a greater amount of power and politics in the industry. <br /> That said, there seems to be politics everywhere from 3 man shops to 300,000 staff firms and across industries from IT to retail fashion. <br /> Whatever the case, it is important to appreciate diversity in opinion and to agree on slide one that we we recognize our personal assumptions that we bring to the table, but that we should keep an open mind for the rest of the session. <br />
  • On this slide, I typically read of the “bold” sentence for each of the numbers. <br /> Then, I write the numbers 1-6 on a whiteboard and go around the room very quickly polling each member of the class, and writing the results next to the numbers on the whiteboard. Generally, in sessions with middle managers, I find that you’ll see a distribution that is skewed left and fairly thin, centering around 2.5 or 3. There will be a few outliers around 5 so you’ll see a slight bump. I would not yet ask participants “why” they answered the way they did. This will come out on following slides. <br /> Audience may be interested to note that different industries seem to skew in different ways. If you do this for an investment bank crowd, for example, the distribution tends to move right and fatten, reflecting, perhaps, a greater amount of power and politics in the industry. <br /> That said, there seems to be politics everywhere from 3 man shops to 300,000 staff firms and across industries from IT to retail fashion. <br /> Whatever the case, it is important to appreciate diversity in opinion and to agree on slide one that we we recognize our personal assumptions that we bring to the table, but that we should keep an open mind for the rest of the session. <br />
  • On this slide, I typically read of the “bold” sentence for each of the numbers. <br /> Then, I write the numbers 1-6 on a whiteboard and go around the room very quickly polling each member of the class, and writing the results next to the numbers on the whiteboard. Generally, in sessions with middle managers, I find that you’ll see a distribution that is skewed left and fairly thin, centering around 2.5 or 3. There will be a few outliers around 5 so you’ll see a slight bump. I would not yet ask participants “why” they answered the way they did. This will come out on following slides. <br /> Audience may be interested to note that different industries seem to skew in different ways. If you do this for an investment bank crowd, for example, the distribution tends to move right and fatten, reflecting, perhaps, a greater amount of power and politics in the industry. <br /> That said, there seems to be politics everywhere from 3 man shops to 300,000 staff firms and across industries from IT to retail fashion. <br /> Whatever the case, it is important to appreciate diversity in opinion and to agree on slide one that we we recognize our personal assumptions that we bring to the table, but that we should keep an open mind for the rest of the session. <br />
  • On this slide, I typically read of the “bold” sentence for each of the numbers. <br /> Then, I write the numbers 1-6 on a whiteboard and go around the room very quickly polling each member of the class, and writing the results next to the numbers on the whiteboard. Generally, in sessions with middle managers, I find that you’ll see a distribution that is skewed left and fairly thin, centering around 2.5 or 3. There will be a few outliers around 5 so you’ll see a slight bump. I would not yet ask participants “why” they answered the way they did. This will come out on following slides. <br /> Audience may be interested to note that different industries seem to skew in different ways. If you do this for an investment bank crowd, for example, the distribution tends to move right and fatten, reflecting, perhaps, a greater amount of power and politics in the industry. <br /> That said, there seems to be politics everywhere from 3 man shops to 300,000 staff firms and across industries from IT to retail fashion. <br /> Whatever the case, it is important to appreciate diversity in opinion and to agree on slide one that we we recognize our personal assumptions that we bring to the table, but that we should keep an open mind for the rest of the session. <br />
  • On this slide, I typically read of the “bold” sentence for each of the numbers. <br /> Then, I write the numbers 1-6 on a whiteboard and go around the room very quickly polling each member of the class, and writing the results next to the numbers on the whiteboard. Generally, in sessions with middle managers, I find that you’ll see a distribution that is skewed left and fairly thin, centering around 2.5 or 3. There will be a few outliers around 5 so you’ll see a slight bump. I would not yet ask participants “why” they answered the way they did. This will come out on following slides. <br /> Audience may be interested to note that different industries seem to skew in different ways. If you do this for an investment bank crowd, for example, the distribution tends to move right and fatten, reflecting, perhaps, a greater amount of power and politics in the industry. <br /> That said, there seems to be politics everywhere from 3 man shops to 300,000 staff firms and across industries from IT to retail fashion. <br /> Whatever the case, it is important to appreciate diversity in opinion and to agree on slide one that we we recognize our personal assumptions that we bring to the table, but that we should keep an open mind for the rest of the session. <br />
  • On this slide, I typically read of the “bold” sentence for each of the numbers. <br /> Then, I write the numbers 1-6 on a whiteboard and go around the room very quickly polling each member of the class, and writing the results next to the numbers on the whiteboard. Generally, in sessions with middle managers, I find that you’ll see a distribution that is skewed left and fairly thin, centering around 2.5 or 3. There will be a few outliers around 5 so you’ll see a slight bump. I would not yet ask participants “why” they answered the way they did. This will come out on following slides. <br /> Audience may be interested to note that different industries seem to skew in different ways. If you do this for an investment bank crowd, for example, the distribution tends to move right and fatten, reflecting, perhaps, a greater amount of power and politics in the industry. <br /> That said, there seems to be politics everywhere from 3 man shops to 300,000 staff firms and across industries from IT to retail fashion. <br /> Whatever the case, it is important to appreciate diversity in opinion and to agree on slide one that we we recognize our personal assumptions that we bring to the table, but that we should keep an open mind for the rest of the session. <br />
  • On this slide, I typically read of the “bold” sentence for each of the numbers. <br /> Then, I write the numbers 1-6 on a whiteboard and go around the room very quickly polling each member of the class, and writing the results next to the numbers on the whiteboard. Generally, in sessions with middle managers, I find that you’ll see a distribution that is skewed left and fairly thin, centering around 2.5 or 3. There will be a few outliers around 5 so you’ll see a slight bump. I would not yet ask participants “why” they answered the way they did. This will come out on following slides. <br /> Audience may be interested to note that different industries seem to skew in different ways. If you do this for an investment bank crowd, for example, the distribution tends to move right and fatten, reflecting, perhaps, a greater amount of power and politics in the industry. <br /> That said, there seems to be politics everywhere from 3 man shops to 300,000 staff firms and across industries from IT to retail fashion. <br /> Whatever the case, it is important to appreciate diversity in opinion and to agree on slide one that we we recognize our personal assumptions that we bring to the table, but that we should keep an open mind for the rest of the session. <br />
  • On this slide, I typically read of the “bold” sentence for each of the numbers. <br /> Then, I write the numbers 1-6 on a whiteboard and go around the room very quickly polling each member of the class, and writing the results next to the numbers on the whiteboard. Generally, in sessions with middle managers, I find that you’ll see a distribution that is skewed left and fairly thin, centering around 2.5 or 3. There will be a few outliers around 5 so you’ll see a slight bump. I would not yet ask participants “why” they answered the way they did. This will come out on following slides. <br /> Audience may be interested to note that different industries seem to skew in different ways. If you do this for an investment bank crowd, for example, the distribution tends to move right and fatten, reflecting, perhaps, a greater amount of power and politics in the industry. <br /> That said, there seems to be politics everywhere from 3 man shops to 300,000 staff firms and across industries from IT to retail fashion. <br /> Whatever the case, it is important to appreciate diversity in opinion and to agree on slide one that we we recognize our personal assumptions that we bring to the table, but that we should keep an open mind for the rest of the session. <br />

Practical office politics Practical office politics Presentation Transcript