• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Transparency as Cure for the Resource Curse?  A Nigerian Case Study
 

Transparency as Cure for the Resource Curse? A Nigerian Case Study

on

  • 15,125 views

A case study of the Nigerian resource curse and it\'s underlying causes with the aim of evaluating the effectiveness of the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative

A case study of the Nigerian resource curse and it\'s underlying causes with the aim of evaluating the effectiveness of the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative

Statistics

Views

Total Views
15,125
Views on SlideShare
15,121
Embed Views
4

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
91
Comments
0

2 Embeds 4

http://www.linkedin.com 3
http://www.slashdocs.com 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Transparency as Cure for the Resource Curse?  A Nigerian Case Study Transparency as Cure for the Resource Curse? A Nigerian Case Study Document Transcript

    •                 School  of  Social  and  Political  Sciences     The  University  of  Melbourne       POLS40011     Political  Science  Thesis       Transparency  as  Cure  for  the  Resource  Curse?       A  Nigerian  Case  Study                   Sebastian  Hancock     134922    
    •      
    •                                Oil   creates   an   illusion   of   a   completely   changed   life,   life   without   work,   life   for  free…The   concept   of   oil   expresses   perfectly   the   eternal   human   dream   of   wealth  achieved  through  lucky  accident…In  this  sense  oil  is  a  fairy  tale  and  like  every  fairy  tale  a  bit  of  a  lie.     Ryzard  Kapuscinki1                                                                                                                      1  Quoted  in  Michael  Watts,  ‘Resource  Curse?  Governmentality,  Oil  and  Power  in  the  Niger  Delta,  Nigeria’,  Geopolitics,  Vol.  9,  No.  1,  2004,  p.  51.     1  
    •       2  
    •        Contents      Acknowledgements   5    List  of  Abbreviations   7    Chapter  1:  Introduction   9    Chapter  2:  The  Resource  Curse  and  the  EITI   16    Chapter  3:    The  Slide  into  the  Resource  Curse   34    Chapter  4:  Social  and  Political  Causes   59    Chapter  5:  Transparency  as  Cure?   69    Chapter  6:  Analysis  and  Conclusions   73    Bibliography   77             3  
    •       4  
    •       This  thesis  is  dedicated  to  the  loving  memory  of  Ruth  Hanley,     and  to  the  strength  of  the  Hanley  family.          Acknowledgements      I  am  heavily  indebted  to  my  thesis  supervisor,  Dr.  Tom  Davis,  whose  input,  advice,  encouragement,  and  above  all  patience,  have  been  invaluable  during  the  past  year.    I  would  also  like  to  thank  Susan  Allen,  Simon  Lands,  and  George  Hancock  for  reading  all  or  sections  of  this  thesis  at  various  stages  of  its  production,  and  providing  useful  suggestions  and  corrections.    Thanks  are  also  due  to  the  University  of  Melbourne,  and  to  the  School  of  Social  and  Political  Sciences  in  particular,  for  providing  both  the  opportunity  to  complete  this  thesis,  and  the  resources  to  do  so.    Lastly,  I  would  like  to  thank  Clare  Hanley,  not  only  for  taking  the  time  to  comment  on  this  work,  but  for  all  her  love  and  support  throughout  a  difficult  year  for  us  both,  without  which  none  of  this  would  have  been  possible.         Sebastian  Hancock     5  
    •       6  
    •  List  of  Abbreviations      CCB     Code  of  Conduct  Bureau    CCT     Code  of  Conduct  Tribunal  CPI     Corruption  Perception  Index  EITI       Extractive  Industries  Transparency  Initiative        EFCC     Economic  and  Financial  Crimes  Commission  GDP     Gross  Domestic  Product            G8     Group  of  Eight      HDI     Human  Development  Index    ICPC     Independent  Corrupt  Practices  and  Other  Related  Offences  Commission  IMF     International  Monetary  Fund          NEITI     Nigerian  Extractive  Industries  Transparency  Initiative  NGOs     Non-­‐Governmental  Organizations    NNPC     Nigerian  National  Petroleum  Corporation    NPC     Northern  People’s  Congress    NPN     National  Party  of  Nigeria      OPEC     Organization  of  Petroleum  Exporting  Countries        TI     Transparency  International    UN     United  Nations          WB     World  Bank         7  
    •         8  
    •  Chapter  1:  Introduction     Sub-­‐Saharan  Africa,  home  to  13  percent  of  the  world’s  population,  currently  contributes  only  3.3  percent  of  global  Gross  Domestic  Product  (GDP).    Growth  and  development  have,  moreover,  been  sluggish  at  best.    As  a  result,  in  the  only  region  in  the  world  where  poverty  has  increased  in  the  past  25  years,  up  to  60  percent  of  the  population  live  on  less  than  US$1.25  per  day.2    This  is  despite  the  fact  that  sub-­‐Saharan  Africa  holds  seven  percent  of  the  world’s  oil  reserves,  not  to  mention  large  deposits  of  other  valuable  primary  commodities  such  as  gold,  diamonds,  and  minerals.    Yet  in  spite  of  this  apparent  wealth,  of  the  177  countries  contained  within  the  United  Nations  (UN)  Human  Development  Index  (HDI),  sub-­‐Saharan  African  countries  are  consistently  ranked  lowest.3     The  inability  to  achieve  significant  social  and  economic  development  amidst  enormous  resource  wealth  is  a  phenomenon  widely  known  as  the  ‘resource  curse’.4    Though  it  extends  to  resource-­‐rich  developing  countries  across  the  globe,  it  is  generally  accepted  that  sub-­‐Saharan  African  countries  have  fared  the  worst  from  this  ‘disease’.    The  resource  curse  manifests  itself  in                                                                                                                  2  Hazel  M.  McFerson,  Extractive  Industries  and  African  Democracy:  Can  the  "Resource  Curse"  be  Exorcised?’,  in  International  Studies  Perspectives,  Vol.  11,  2010,  p.  335.  3  Ibid,  p.  336.  4  Richard  Auty  first  coined  the  term  ‘resource  curse’  in  1993.    Richard  M.  Auty,  Sustaining  Development  in  Mineral  Economies:  The  Resource  Curse  Thesis,  London,  Routledge,  1993,  pp.  1-­‐6.    The  relationship  is  also  commonly  described  as  the  ‘paradox  of  the  plenty’,  a  reference  to  the  title  of  Terry  Lynn  Karl’s  seminal  work.    Terry  Lynn  Karl,  The  Paradox  of  Plenty:  Oil  Booms  and  Petro-­‐States,  Berkeley,  University  of  California  Press,  1997.    The  term  resource  curse  will  be  used  for  the  remainder  of  this  study.     9  
    • economic  stagnation,  political  instability,  conflict,  corruption,  institutional  and  societal  failure,  and  ultimately  underdevelopment.5    Nowhere  has  its  effects  been  more  virulent  than  in  Nigeria,  where  enormous  oil  wealth  exists  alongside  internal  conflict,  economic  collapse,  extreme  poverty,  endemic  corruption,  instability,  and  long  periods  of  authoritarian  and  predatory  rule.6    Currently,  Nigeria’s  UN  HDI  rating  of  0.423  (with  1  being  the  highest  score)  ranks  it  well  below  other  oil  producing  states  such  as  Saudi  Arabia  (0.800)  and  Indonesia  (0.697).7     The  current  global  response  to  the  resource  curse,  including  its  manifestation  in  Nigeria,  is  centred  on  the  energy  governance  framework  known  as  the  Extractive  Industries  Transparency  Initiative  (EITI).    Launched  by  Tony  Blair  in  2002  at  the  World  Summit  on  Sustainable  Development  in  Johannesburg,  the  EITI  seeks  oil-­‐sector  transparency  via  the  voluntary  publishing  of  government  revenues  originating  from  resource  extraction  companies.    Under  the  EITI  framework,  countries  firstly  obtain  ‘candidate’  status  by  successfully  meeting  benchmarks  for  four  signup  indicators.    Once  completed,  the  country  can  secure  ‘compliant’  status  by  producing  regular  validation  reports  showing  the  aforementioned  flows  of  revenue.8    By  undergoing  this  process  it  is  felt  that                                                                                                                  5  See  for  example,  Helen  M.  McFerson,  ‘Governance  and  Hyper-­‐Corruption  in  Resource-­‐Rich  African  Countries’,  Third  World  Quarterly,  Vol.  30,  No.  8,  2009,  p.1529-­‐1545.  6  Ibid,  pp.  1540-­‐1542.  7  When  adjusted  for  income  inequality  this  figure  plummets  to  0.246.    This  ranking  puts  Nigeria  at  142  out  of  169  countries  measured.    Saudi  Arabia  and  Indonesia  are  ranked  at  55  and  108  respectively.    Nigerian’s  currently  have  a  life  expectancy  of  just  48.4  years.    United  Nations  Development  Programme,  International  Human  Development  Indicators,  retrieved  16  March  2011,  available  from  <http://hdrstats.undp.org/en/  countries/profiles/NGA.html.    8  EITI  signup  indicators  –  ‘1.  The  government  must  issue  an  unequivocal  public  statement  of  its  intention  to  implement  EITI.    2.  The  government  must  commit  to  work     10  
    • civil  society  organizations  in  compliant  countries  will  be  able  to  use  the  release  of  revenue  information  to  hold  their  governments  to  account,  thereby  reducing  corruption  and  institutional  failure,  and  helping  to  cure  the  resource  curse.9         Nigeria  is  often  presented  as  a  test  case  for  the  effectiveness  of  the  EITI  framework.    Over  80  percent  of  Nigeria’s  oil  revenue  has  historically  gone  to  only  one  percent  of  the  population,  largely  due  to  systematic  corruption  and  graft.10    The  cumulative  effect  of  this  enrichment  has  been  the  loss  of  resources  that  could  have  been  invested  in  social,  economic  and  cultural  development.11    After  returning  to  democratic  governance  in  1999  following  prolonged  periods  of  military  rule,  the  incumbent  government  signed  up  to  the  EITI  framework,  completing  the  process  by  achieving  compliant  status  on  2  March  2011.12    Although  significant  progress  has  been  made  towards  oil-­‐sector  transparency,  the  entrenched  nature  of  systematic  corruption  and  the  failure  of  weak  civil  society  organizations  in  Nigeria  to  respond  purposefully  to  the  publishing  of                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              with  civil  society  and  companies  on  EITI  implementation.    3.    The  government  must  appoint  a  senior  individual  to  lead  on  EITI  implementation.    4.  The  government  must  publish  and  make  widely  available  a  fully  costed  Work  Plan  containing  measurable  targets,  a  timetable  for  implementation  and  an  assessment  of  capacity  constraints.’    Extractive  Industries  Transparency  Initiative,  Signup,  retrieved  8  March  2011,  available  from  <http://eiti.org/eiti/  implementation/signup>.    For  candidate  status  requirements  see  Extractive  Industries  Transparency  Initiative,  Country  Implementation,  retrieved  8  March  2011,  available  from  <http://eiti.org/eiti/implementation>.  9  Daniel  M.  Firger,  Tranparency  and  the  Natural  Resource  Curse:  Examining  the  New  Extraterritorial  Information  Forcing  Rules  in  the  Dodd-­‐Frank  Wall  Street  Reform  Act  of  2010’,  Georgetown  Journal  of  International  Law,  Vol.  41,  2010,  pp.  1064-­‐1067.  10  Adekunle  Amuwo,  ‘Towards  a  New  Political  Economy  of  the  Niger  Delta  Question  in  Nigeria’,  Politikon,  Vol.  36,  No.  2,  2009,  p.  241.  11  S.O.  Osoba,  ‘Corruption  in  Nigeria:  Historical  Perspectives’,  Review  of  African  Political  Economy,  Vol.  23,  No.  69,  1996,  p.  383.  12  Extractive  Industries  Transparency  Initiative,  Press  Release:  Six  More  Countries  Compliant  with  Transparency  and  Accountability  Standard,  2  March  2011,  p.  1,  retrieved  16  March  2011,  available  from  <http://eiti.org/news-­‐events/press-­‐release-­‐six-­‐more-­‐countries-­‐compliant-­‐transparency-­‐and-­‐accountability-­‐standard>.     11  
    • information  under  this  framework  raises  doubts  about  the  EITI’s  ability  to  cure  the  resource  curse  in  this  country.13     This  study  will  address  the  question  of  how  effective  the  EITI  as  a  global  governance  mechanism  can  be  in  ‘curing’  the  resource  curse.    It  will  attempt  to  answer  this  question  through  an  inductive  case  study  method  focusing  on  Nigeria.    It  will  ask:  To  what  degree  has  the  historical  weight  of  specific  social  and  political  factors  in  Nigeria  entrenched  its  distinct  manifestation  of  the  resource  curse  within  its  socio-­‐political  structures?      It  will  analyse  the  historical  interplay  of  ethnic  division,  endemic  and  systematic  corruption,  and  violent  competition  for  the  state  in  Nigeria  in  order  to  uncover  root  causes  for  developmental  failure  and  the  resource  curse.    Given  the  results  of  this  analysis,  this  study  will  ask  whether  the  voluntary  EITI  framework  is  indeed  wholly  inadequate,  and  whether  deep  structural  and  cultural  change  is  in  fact  required  in  order  for  resource  abundance  to  be  turned  into  positive  developmental  outcomes.     Nigeria  has  been  selected  as  the  subject  of  this  case  study  as  it  meets  the  criterion  of  ‘typicality’  required  for  assessing  the  general  effectiveness  of  the  EITI.    The  presence  of  extensive  oil  reserves,  along  with  the  country’s  status  as  one  of  the  most  corrupt  in  the  world,14  has  made  Nigeria  both  a  typical  case  of  the                                                                                                                  13  Ayo  Obe,  ‘The  Challenging  Case  of  Nigeria’,  in  Ann  Florini  (ed.),  The  Right  to  Know:  Transparency  for  an  Open  World,  New  York,  Columbia  University  Press,  2007,  p.  147.  14  As  at  2010,  Nigeria  was  134th  out  of  178  countries  listed  under  Transparency  International’s  Corruption  Perception  Index.    Transparency  International,  Corruption  Perceptions  Index  2010,  Berlin,  Transparency  International,  2010,  p.  13,  retrieved  16  March  2011,  available  from  <http://www.transparency.org/policy_research/  surveys_indices/cpi  /2010/in_detail>.     12  
    • resource  curse,  and  a  test  case  for  the  capacity  of  the  EITI  framework  to  alleviate  the  disease.15    Nigeria  therefore  satisfies  John  Gerring’s  requirement  that  the  typical  case  be  representative  of  a  broader  set,  allowing  for  insight  into  some  broader  phenomenon.16     The  use  of  case  study  methodologies  within  the  scholarly  literature  on  the  resource  curse  is  severely  lacking.    Instead,  the  vast  majority  of  research  has  taken  the  form  of  cross-­‐country  correlation  analysis.    Yet  the  sole  use  of  the  latter  methodology  can  be  inadequate  due  to  its  inherent  limitations.    For  instance,  the  uncovering  of  correlations  in  datasets  does  not  necessarily  aid  in  the  formation  of  causal  models,  nor  in  dealing  with  complexity.17    It  is  these  very  limitations  that  correspond  to  the  advantages  of  case  study  research.    For  whereas  statistical  analysis  is  the  process  through  which  conclusions  are  drawn  about  the  existence  of  characteristics  in  a  population  through  study  of  a  sample,  logical  inference  from  case  study  data  is  the  process  whereby  conclusions  regarding  the  essential  linkage  between  those  characteristics  are  made  in  terms  of  a  ‘systematic  explanatory  schema’  or  theory.18    The  two  methodologies  can  therefore  be  thought  of  as  complementary,  adding  to  a  deeper  understanding  of  social  forces  through  concurrent  usage.                                                                                                                    15  Alexandra  Gillies,  Obasanjo,  the  Donor  Community  and  Reform  Implementation  in  Nigeria’,  Round  Table,  Vol.  96,  No.  392,  2007,  pp.  570-­‐572.  16  John  Gerring,  Case  Study  Research:  Principles  and  Practices,  Cambridge,  Cambridge  University  Press,  2007,  p.  91.  17  Ibid,  pp.  3-­‐4.  18  J.  Clyde  Mitchell,  Case  and  Situation  Analysis’,  in  Matthew  David  (ed.),  Case  Study  Research:  Volume  II,  London,  SAGE,  2006,  p.  72.     13  
    • This  is  not  to  say  that  case  study  research  has  no  limitations  of  its  own.    There  can  be  no  doubt,  for  example,  that  the  interpretation  of  case  study  data  lacks  the  level  of  objectivity  obtainable  in  statistical  analysis.    Yet,  the  possibility  of  ‘noisy,  fallible,  and  biased’  results  does  not  necessarily  preclude  the  attainment  of  knowledge;  rather,  it  requires  a  critical  reading  with  bias  in  mind.19           In  order  to  address  the  issues  described  above,  this  study  has  been  separated  into  sections.    In  chapter  two  I  will  discuss  the  status  of  the  literature  surrounding  the  resource  curse  and  its  relationship  to  the  EITI  framework,  while  identifying  areas  in  which  I  feel  the  literature  is  lacking.    In  chapter  three  I  will  provide  an  overview  of  the  ongoing  historical  process  in  Nigeria,  and  the  effect  the  entry  of  oil  had  on  that  process.    This  overview  will  draw  upon  the  available  primary  and  secondary  sources,  the  former  largely  being  documents  related  the  to  the  EITI  and  its  Nigerian  counterpart,  the  Nigerian  Extractive  Industries  Transparency  Initiative  (NEITI),  and  the  latter  consisting  of  works  on  Nigerian  social  and  political  history,  regional  case  studies,  and  analyses  of  particular  aspects  of  the  Nigerian  socio-­‐political  system.    In  chapter  four,  I  will  analyse  the  specific  social  and  political  factors  drawn  out  of  that  overview,  and  the  effect  they  have  had  on  the  specific  manifestation  of  the  resource  curse  in  Nigeria.    From  the  results  of  this  analysis  I  will  assess,  in  chapter  five,  the  suitability  of  the  EITI  framework  as  a  cure  for  the  resource  curse.    In  the  final  chapter,  I  will  draw                                                                                                                  19  Campbell,  Donald  T.,  "Degrees  of  Freedom"  and  the  Case  Study’,  in  Matthew  David  (ed.),  Case  Study  Research:  Volume  III,  London,  SAGE,  2006,  p.  138.     14  
    • some  conclusions  from  this  study  in  relation  to  the  questions  outlined  above,  and  to  the  status  of  the  literature  on  the  resource  curse  and  the  EITI.         15  
    •  Chapter  2:  The  Resource  Curse  and  the  EITI       Over  the  last  two  decades,  a  significant  body  of  literature  has  emerged  which  seeks  to  explain  the  seemingly  contradictory  relationship  between  natural  resource  abundance  and  poor  development  outcomes,  often  referred  to  as  the  resource  curse.    Within  this  body  of  literature,  three  separate  sub-­‐literatures  can  be  identified:  natural  resources  and  economic  stagnation;  natural  resources  and  civil  war;  and  natural  resources  and  governance  failure.    While  this  thesis  sits  within  the  latter  of  the  three,  it  is  important  first  to  address  the  development  of  the  resource  curse  theory.    From  Consensus  to  Curse     During  the  1950s  and  1960s,  prominent  development  economists  had  argued  that  developing  countries  were  suffering  from  an  imbalance  in  the  factors  of  production,  caused  by  an  oversupply  of  labour,  and  a  shortage  of  capital.    As  such,  countries  with  abundant  natural  resources  were  in  an  advantageous  position;  through  exploitation  of  these  resources,  Walter  Rostow  and  others  argued,  their  economies  would  ‘take-­‐off’  thanks  to  the  capacity  of  primary  exports  to  raise  capital  and  attract  foreign  investment.20    While  there  were  a                                                                                                                  20  For  an  example  of  this  argument  see  Walter  Rostow,  The  Stages  of  Economic  Growth:  A  non-­‐Communist  Manifesto,  Cambridge,  Cambridge  University  Press,  1960,  p.  39;  see  also  W.  Arthur  Lewis,  The  Theory  of  Economic  Growth,  London,  Allen  and  Unwin,  1955,  p.  52,  where  he  argues  that  not  only  did  natural  resources  lead  to  better  development     16  
    • number  of  radical  economists  who  challenged  this  view,  their  underrepresentation  in  global  development  bodies  negated  their  ability  to  alter  the  overriding  consensus.21    On  the  contrary,  the  oil  boom  years  of  the  1970s,  which  led  to  soaring  prices  and  a  glut  of  capital  in  oil  exporting  countries,  solidified  natural  resources  as  a  ‘blessing’  within  the  emerging  neoliberal  mainstream.22     With  the  collapse  of  oil  prices  in  the  early  1980s  and  the  economic  stagnation  amongst  exporters  that  followed  it,  this  ‘blessing’  began  to  be  seriously  questioned.    Indeed,  the  majority  of  resource-­‐rich  developing  countries,  with  the  notable  exception  of  the  East  Asian  economies,  had  not  experienced  accelerated  growth  on  the  back  of  resource  booms.    Moreover,  having  geared  their  economies  towards  primary  exports,  many  were  left  heavily  dependent  upon  volatile  global  markets  for  national  income.23    At  the  same  time,  conflict                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              outcomes,  but  ‘[m]uch  of  the  world’s  economic  history  can  be  written  very  simply  in  those  terms.’  21  For  example  see  H.  W.  Singer,  The  Distribution  of  Gains  between  Investing  and  Borrowing  Countries’,  American  Economic  Review,  Vol.  40,  No.  2,  1950,  pp.  482-­‐483,  and  Raúl  Prebisch,  The  Economic  Development  of  Latin  America  and  its  Principal  Problems,  New  York,  United  Nations  Department  of  Economics,  1950,  pp.  8-­‐14,  who  argued  that  exporters  would  suffer  from  declining  terms  of  trade  in  the  long  term.    See  also  Jonathan  V.  Levin,  The  Export  Economies:  Their  Pattern  of  Development  in  Historical  Perspective,  Cambridge,  Harvard  University  Press,  1960,  pp.  186-­‐202,  who  argued  that  due  to  the  boom  and  bust  nature  of  resource  markets,  and  correspondingly  sharp  price  fluctuations,  resource  exporters  would  be  left  with  volatile  domestic  economies,  leading  to  unreliable  foreign  exchange  supplies  and  a  poor  investment  climate.  22  Andrew  Rosser,  The  Political  Economy  of  the  Resource  Curse:  A  Literature  Review,  Brighton,  Institute  of  Development  Studies,  University  of  Sussex,  2006,  p.  9.    For  an  example  of  neoliberal  arguments  on  natural  resource  backed  ‘take-­‐off’  see  Bela  Balassa,  The  Process  of  Industrial  Development  and  Alternative  Development  Strategies,  Princeton,  Princeton  University  Press,  1981,  pp.  2-­‐4,  and  P.J.  Drake,  Natural  Resources  Versus  Foreign  Borrowing  in  Economic  Development’,  Economic  Journal,  Vol.  82,  No.  327,  1972,  pp.  951-­‐952.  23  As  Isham  et  al.  have  shown,  since  1980  developing  countries  dependent  upon  natural  resource  exports  suffered  significant  and  ongoing  slowdowns  in  economic  growth,  while  manufacture  exporters  have  experienced  no  such  slowdown.    Jonathan  Isham  et  al.  The     17  
    • and  political  instability  were  rife,  signalling  a  general  malaise,  especially  in  the  case  of  sub-­‐Saharan  Africa.24    This  failure  to  produce  positive  development  outcomes  initiated  renewed  debate  on  the  concept  of  ‘take-­‐off’,  and  sparked  the  emergence  of  resource  curse  theory.     Numerous  empirical  studies  have  since  been  undertaken  by  economists  in  an  effort  to  confirm  the  existence  of  the  resource  curse.    These  studies  have  largely  taken  the  form  of  cross-­‐country  statistical  analysis  in  an  effort  to  uncover  significant  correlations  between  natural  resource  abundance  and  a  variety  of  indicators  for  poor  economic,  political,  and  social  outcomes.    The  most  influential  of  these  studies,  Jeffrey  Sachs’  and  Andrew  Warner’s  seminal  1995  work  Natural  Resource  Abundance  and  Economic  Growth,  found  that  a  one  standard  deviation  increase  in  the  ratio  of  natural  resource  exports  to  GDP  in  developing  countries  is  associated  with  a  decrease  of  just  less  than  one  percent  in  annual  per  capita  growth.25    In  the  years  following,  several  other  studies  appeared  which  produced  similar  results,  albeit  with  variations  in  datasets  and  measurements.26    While                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              Varieties  of  Resource  Experience:  Natural  Resource  Export  Structures  and  the  Political  Economy  of  Economic  Growth’,  World  Bank  Economic  Review,  Vol.  19,  No.  2,  2005,  p.  143.  24  Karl,  The  Paradox  of  Plenty,  p.  1-­‐2.  25  Jeffrey  D.  Sachs  and  Andrew  M.  Warner,  Natural  Resource  Abundance  and  Economic  Growth,  National  Bureau  of  Economic  Research  Working  Paper  5398,  Cambridge,  National  Bureau  of  Economic  Research,  1995,  p.  8.    Specifically,  Sachs  and  Warner  found  a  one  standard  deviation  increase  led  to  a  0.93  percent  per  annum  reduction.        26  See  for  example  Alan  H.  Gelb,  Oil  Windfalls:  Blessing  or  Curse?,  New  York,  Oxford  University  Press,  1988,  pp.  221-­‐223,  who  found  a  statistically  significant  relationship  between  the  size  of  natural  resource  endowments  and  growth  of  output;  Richard  M.  Auty,  Introduction  and  Overview’,  in  Richard  M.  Auty  (ed.),  Resource  Abundance  and  Economic  Development,  Oxford,  Oxford  University  Press,  2001,  p.  3,  who  found  that  per  capita  incomes  in  resource-­‐poor  countries  grew  between  two  and  three  times  faster  than  resource-­‐rich  countries  between  1960  and  1990;  and  Carlos  Leite  and  Jens  Weidmann,  Does  Mother  Nature  Corrupt?    Natural  Resources,  Corruption  and  Economic  Growth,  Washington,  International  Monetary  Fund,  1999,  p.  29,  who  focused  on  oil     18  
    • these  findings  have  certainly  generated  controversy,27  Sachs  and  Warner,  in  reviewing  the  evidence  for  the  research  curse  in  2001,  asserted  that  while  not  ‘bulletproof’,  empirical  support  for  its  existence  is  nonetheless  ‘quite  strong’.28    With  its  existence  largely  confirmed,  attention  has  concentrated  on  the  causal  mechanisms  of  the  resource  curse,  leading  to  the  creation  of  three  sub-­‐literatures.    Sub-­‐Literature  1:  Economic  Structure     The  first  sub-­‐literature  focused  on  observed  economic  stagnation,  and  suggested  structural  deficiencies  as  the  explanatory  variable.    The  most  prominent  model  put  forward  was  the  ‘Dutch  Disease’,  which  describes  the  negative  effect  resource  booms  can  have  on  the  growth  of  non-­‐resource  sectors  of  the  economy  (manufacturing  and  agriculture  for  example)  and  refers  to  the  experience  of  The  Netherlands  following  the  discovery  of  natural  gas  in  the  late                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              exporters,  and  concluded  that  a  one  standard  deviation  increase  in  Sachs’  and  Warner’s  ratio  led  to  a  0.6  percent  decrease  in  output  growth.    27  See  for  example  Daniel  Lederman  and  William  F.  Maloney,  Neither  Curse  Nor  Destiny:    Introduction  to  Natural  Resources  and  Development’,  in  Daniel  Lederman  and  William  F.  Maloney  (eds.),  Natural  Resources:  Neither  Curse  nor  Destiny,  Palo  Alto,  Standford  University  Press,  2007,  p.  3,  who  found  that  natural  resources  in  fact  stimulate  growth,  if  measurements  for  natural  resource  abundance,  other  than  Sachs’  and  Warner’s,  are  used;  Christa  N.  Brunnschweiler,  Cursing  the  Blessings?  Natural  Resource  Abundance,  Institutions,  and  Economic  Growth’,  World  Development,  Vol.  36,  No.  3,  2008,  pp.  412-­‐413,  who  used  natural  resource  allocation  per  capita  and  found  that  between  1970  and  2000  there  was  a  positive  and  direct  effect  on  real  GDP  growth;  and  Graham  Davis  Learning  to  Love  the  Dutch  Disease:  Evidence  from  the  Mineral  Economies’,  World  Development,  Vol.  23,  No.  10,  1995,  pp.  1774-­‐1777,  who  found  that  by  some  measures  such  as  infant  mortality,  life  expectancy,  and  the  UN’s  HDI,  they  have  actually  outperformed  non-­‐mineral  economies.  28  Jeffrey  D.  Sachs  and  Andrew  M.  Warner,  The  Curse  of  Natural  Resources’,  European  Economic  Review,  Vol.  45,  No.  4,  2001,  p.  828.     19  
    • 1950s.29    Yet  as  Michael  Ross  argues,  structural  economic  mechanisms  such  as  the  Dutch  Disease  tend  to  ignore  the  positive  effect  corrective  government  policy  could  have,  and  fail  to  explain  why  such  action  is  not  undertaken.30    For  as  Paul  Collier  and  Anke  Hoeffler  have  pointed  out,  natural  resources  have  led  to  accelerated  development  in  Malaysia  and  Botswana,  not  to  mention  Norway  and  Australia,  rather  than  to  manifestations  of  the  resource  curse.31    In  response  to  such  criticisms,  two  further  sub-­‐literatures  emerged  which  attempted  to  identify  broader  causal  mechanisms  underlying  the  merely  economic  and  structural.32    Sub-­‐Literature  2:  Curse  and  Conflict     The  second  sub-­‐literature  on  the  resource  curse  focuses  on  natural  resource  abundance  and  the  occurrence  and  duration  of  civil  wars  in  resource-­‐rich  countries.    Several  studies  have  sought  to  establish  a  positive  correlation  between  the  two  using  cross-­‐country  analysis.    For  instance,  Collier  and  Hoeffler,  in  a  1998  study  of  98  countries  and  27  civil  wars,  found  this  relationship  to  be                                                                                                                  29  Specifically,  due  to  booms  in  the  resource  sector,  productive  resources  are  drawn  away  from  other  tradeable  sectors  of  the  economy  towards  ‘non-­‐tradable’  sectors  such  as  services,  thereby  shrinking  productive  output.    Michael  Burno  and  Jeffrey  D.  Sachs,  Energy  and  Resources  Allocation:  A  Dynamic  Model  of  the  "Dutch  Disease"’,  Review  of  Economic  Studies,  Vol.  XLIX,  1982,  pp.  845-­‐846.    See  also  W.  Max  Corden  and  J.  Peter  Neary,  Booming  Sector  and  De-­‐Industrialisation  in  a  Small  Open  Economy’,  Economic  Journal,  Vol.  92,  No.  368,  1982,  pp.  825-­‐842;  and  Peter  J.  Neary  and  Sweder  van  Wijnbergen,  Natural  Resources  and  the  Macroeconomy:  A  Theoretical  Framework’,  in  J.  Peter  Neary  and  Sweder  van  Wijnbergen  (eds.),  Natural  Resources  and  the  Macroeconomy,  Oxford,  Basil  Blackwell,  1986,  pp.  13-­‐45.  30  See  Michael  L.  Ross,  What  Do  We  Know  About  Natural  Resources  and  Civil  War?’,  Journal  of  Peace  Research,  Vol.  41,  No.  3,  2004,  pp.  306-­‐307.  31  Paul  Collier  and  Anke  Hoeffler,  Rents,  Governance,  and  Conflict’,  Journal  of  Conflict  Resolution,  Vol.  49,  No.  4,  2005,  p.  627.    For  a  good  examination  of  the  case  of  Botswana  see  Daron  Acemoglu  et  al.,  An  African  Success  Story:  Botswana,  CEPR  Discussion  Paper  3219,  London,  Centre  for  Economic  Policy  Research,  2002.  32  Michael  L.  Ross,  Review:  The  Political  Economy  of  the  Resource  Curse’,  World  Politics,  Vol.  51,  No.  2,  1999,  p.  303-­‐308.     20  
    • positive,  which  they  would  confirm  in  two  subsequent  studies  of  2004  and  2009.33    Mary  Kaldor,  Terry  Lynn  Karl  and  Yahia  Said,  who  examined  oil  specifically,  argued  that  these  civil  wars  should  be  thought  of  as  ‘new  oil  wars’,  for  unlike  those  of  the  20th  century  in  which  oil  was  seen  as  a  strategic  resource,  requiring  territorial  control  or  at  the  very  least  influence  over  host  governments,  these  new  wars  are  essentially  fought  over  access  to  resource  rents.    According  to  the  authors,  conflict  arises  due  to  different  groups  within  countries  seeking  control  over  the  economic  gains  generated  from  oil  exploitation.    This  rent-­‐seeking  behaviour,  and  the  conflict  that  ensues,  negatively  affects  economic  growth,  leads  to  institutional  failure,  a  predatory  political  culture,  and  ultimately  the  resource  curse.34        Sub-­‐Literature  3:  The  Curse  of  Political  Structures     The  third  sub-­‐literature  on  the  resource  curse,  and  the  one  in  which  this  study  is  broadly  located,  focuses  on  what  Karl  terms  the  ‘political/institutional  phenomenon’  of  the  resource  curse.35    As  it  became  increasingly  clear  that  economic  mechanisms  alone  failed  to  explain  the  existence  of  a  resource  curse,  the  literature  has  since  the  mid-­‐1990s  progressively  shifted  toward  explanations  focused  on  governance  failures.    These  explanations  emphasize  abundance  as  the                                                                                                                  33  Paul  Collier  and  Anke  Hoeffler,  ‘On  Economic  Causes  of  Civil  War’,  Oxford  Economic  Papers,  Vol.  50,  No.  4,  1998,  p.  571.    In  their  two  subsequent  studies  the  data  sets  were  greatly  expanded,  with  their  results  holding  regardless.    See  Paul  Collier  and  Anke  Hoeffler,  Greed  and  Grievance  in  Civil  War’,  Oxford  Economic  Papers,  Vol.  56,  No.  4,  2004,  pp.  563-­‐588;  and  Paul  Collier  and  Anke  Hoeffler,  Beyond  Greed  and  Grievance:  Feasibility  and  Civil  War’,  Oxford  Economic  Papers,  Vol.  61,  No.  1,  2009,  pp.  13-­‐24.  34  Mary  Kaldor  et  al.,  Introduction’,  in  Mary  Kaldor  et  al.  (eds.),  Oil  Wars,  London,  Pluto  Press,  2007,  pp.  2-­‐26.  35  Karl,  The  Paradox  of  Plenty,  p.  257.     21  
    • root  cause  of  institutional  collapse,  corrupt  government  practices,  and  rent-­‐seeking  behaviour,  which  in  turn  act  as  both  cause  and  effect  of  the  resource  curse.    Resource  wealth,  moreover,  allows  political  elites  to  maintain  control  of  corrupt  and  inefficient  systems  through  excessive  spending  on  military  and  internal  security  capacities,  as  well  as  political  support.36    For  these  theorists,  natural  resource  abundance  is  associated  with  low  levels  of  democracy  and  democratic  values,  which  helps  to  preclude  development  for  the  majority.37     A  number  of  studies  have  found  a  correlation  between  natural  resource  abundance,  particularly  in  the  case  of  point-­‐source  resources  such  as  oil,  and  low  levels  of  democracy.    In  a  study  of  113  countries  from  1971-­‐1997,  Ross  found  that  the  presence  of  extensive  oil  reserves  in  particular  has  a  detrimental  effect  on  democracy  in  developing  countries.38    Nathan  Jensen  and  Leonard  Wantchekon,  who  conducted  a  survey  of  46  sub-­‐Saharan  countries  between  1970  and  1995,  also  found  that  countries  with  higher  levels  of  resource  dependency  tended  to  be  authoritarian  compared  with  those  less  reliant  on  natural  resource  endowments.    Further,  following  the  ‘third  wave’  of  democratization  in  the  region,  those  resource-­‐rich  countries  tended  to  revert  to  authoritarian  rule  over  time.39    These  and  other  studies  confirmed  a  positive                                                                                                                  36  Gavin  Hilson  and  Roy  Maconachie,  "Good  Governance"  and  the  Extractive  Industries  in  Sub-­‐Saharan  Africa’,  Mineral  Processing  &  Extractive  Metallurgy  Review,  Vol.  30,  2009,  pp.  61-­‐62.    Rosser,  The  Political  Economy  of  the  Resource  Curse,  p.  20-­‐22.  37  See  for  example,  Karl,  The  Paradox  of  Plenty,  pp.  14-­‐18;  Hazem  Beblawi,  The  Rentier  State  in  the  Arab  World’,  in  Hazem  Beblawi  and    Giacomo  Luciani  (eds.),  The  Rentier  State,  New  York,  Croom  Helm,  1987,  pp.  49-­‐62  in  relation  to  the  Middle  East;  and  Nathan  Jensen  and  Leonard  Wantchekon,  Resource  Wealth  and  Political  Regimes  in  Africa’,  Comparative  Political  Studies,  Vol.  37,  No.  7,  2004,  pp.  834-­‐836  in  relation  to  Africa.  38  Michael  L.  Ross,  What  Do  We  Know  About  Natural  Resources  and  Civil  War?’,  Journal  of  Peace  Research,  Vol.  41,  No.  3,  2004,  p.  342.  39  Jensen  and  Wantchekon,  ‘Resource  Wealth  and  Political  Regimes’,  p.  836.       22  
    • correlation  between  natural  resource  abundance  and  non-­‐democratic  governance.40     Explanations  for  this  correlation  have  focused  on  the  detrimental  effects  of  economic  rents  associated  with  resource  extraction,  and  the  subsequent  establishment  of  ‘rentier  states’.    While  rent  in  the  broadest  sense  of  income  derived  from  ownership  of  natural  endowments  is  present  in  all  economies,  the  ‘rentier  state’  is  a  more  detrimental  phenomenon.    Hossein  Mahdavy,  the  first  to  develop  the  concept,  defined  the  ‘rentier  state’  as  one  in  which  a  significant  proportion  of  national  income  is  derived  from  external  economic  rents.41    Hazem  Beblawi,  observing  the  phenomenon  across  the  oil-­‐producing  Arab  states,  expanded  upon  this  concept,  arguing  that  ‘rentier  states’  are  not  only  characterized  by  the  reliance  upon  such  rents,  but  that  the  gains  derived  are  produced  for  the  benefit  of  a  relatively  small  proportion  of  the  population,  who  are  coalesced  around  the  state.    The  remainder  of  the  population,  being  excluded  from  the  generation  of  wealth,  are  engaged  only  in  its  ‘distribution  and  utilisation’.42         Various  mechanisms  through  which  the  rentier  state  gives  rise  to  the  resource  curse  have  been  advanced.    This  thesis  can  be  located  amongst  those  deemed  ‘state-­‐centric’,  though  others  have  also  done  important  work  on                                                                                                                  40  For  an  overview  of  many  to  the  studies  not  mentioned  here,  see  Rosser,  The  Political  Economy  of  the  Resource  Curse,  p.  20.  41  Mahdavy  developed  the  concept  in  relation  to  pre-­‐revolutionary  Iran.    Hossein  Mahdavy,  ‘Patterns  and  Problems  of  Economic  Development  in  Rentier  States:  The  Case  of  Iran’,  in  M.  A.  Cook  (ed.),  Studies  in  Economic  History  of  the  Middle  East:  From  the  Rise  of  Islam  to  the  Present  Day,  Oxford,  Oxford  University  Press,  1970,  p.  428-­‐429.      42  Beblawi,  ‘The  Rentier  Sate  in  the  Arab  World’,  pp.  50-­‐52.     23  
    • cognitive  and  societal  mediation.43    A  prominent  example  of  the  state-­‐centric  approach  is  Karl’s  Paradox  of  the  Plenty.    In  it  she  argues  that  the  origin  of  state  revenue  determines  all  levels  of  governance,  and  hence  the  ability  of  the  state  to  foster  economic  growth.    As  decision-­‐making  and  governance  in  the  rentier  state  are  based  upon  linkages  between  power  and  abundance,  accumulation  and  rent  seeking  become  the  mainstay  of  political  activity,  and  define  the  nature  of  the  state  itself.      Special  interests,  social  classes,  and  negative  patterns  of  action  form  around  oil  rents,  and  competition  for  control  of  the  state  becomes  paramount.44    For  Karl,  the  particular  characteristics  of  oil,  including  its  enclave  nature,  high  capital  requirements,  and  strategic  value,  produces  an  extreme  form  of  the  rentier  state’s  institutional  setting,  which  she  terms  the  ‘petro-­‐state’.45     As  indicated  above,  once  a  rentier  or  petro-­‐state  has  been  established,  state-­‐centric  approaches  argue  that  the  tendency  will  be  towards  authoritarian  forms  of  rule.    For  Ross,  three  causal  mechanisms  mediate  this  relationship  –  the  rentier  effect  (the  combined  use  of  rent  distribution  and  low  taxes  in  order  to  impede  democratization),  the  repression  effect  (the  use  of  resource  rent  wealth  to  build  up  internal  security  apparatuses)  and  the  modernization  effect  (the  absence  of  social  and  cultural  changes  towards  democracy  brought  about  by  sustained  economic  development).46    It  is  this  ‘executive  discretion’  over  the  distribution  of  rents  that  helps  to  bring  down  democracies  and  sustain  authoritarian  rule.    Competition  for  the  state  can  be  contained  only  by  (resource                                                                                                                  43  See  Ross,  ‘Review:  The  Political  Economy  of  the  Resource  Curse’,  pp.  309-­‐312.  44  Karl,  The  Paradox  of  Plenty,  pp.  14-­‐15.  45  Ibid,  p.  15-­‐17.  46  Michael  L.  Ross,  Does  Oil  Hinder  Democracy?’,  World  Politics,  Vol.  53,  No.  3,  2001,  pp.  332-­‐337.     24  
    • rent  financed)  authoritarian  and  military  repression.47    This  argument  is  consistent  with  the  findings  of  Benjamin  Smith,  who  found  that  countries  abundant  in  oil  wealth  tend  to  exhibit  fewer  instances  of  civil  war  and  anti-­‐state  protest  alongside  high  regime  stability,  as  a  result  of  the  presence  of  rents.48         At  the  heart  of  these  approaches,  therefore,  is  the  corrupting  influence  of  rents  derived  from  natural  resource  abundance,  and  the  negative  effect  this  influence  has  on  the  nature  of  the  state,  and  on  development  generally.    Little  attention  is  given  to  the  ways  in  which  external  power  forces  related  to  geo-­‐political  and  geo-­‐economic  environments  help  shape  the  resource  curse  in  producing  countries.49    Neglecting  the  Subject     Two  key  points  can  be  made  regarding  the  above  literature  for  the  purposes  of  the  current  study.    Firstly,  at  the  heart  of  the  majority  of  work  on  the  resource  curse  sub-­‐literature  lie  the  relative  size  of  a  country’s  resource  endowment,  and  the  rents  it  generates,  as  the  explanatory  variables.    As  a  result  there  is  a  tendency  to  ignore  the  specific  social  and  political  context  into  which  resource  extraction  penetrates.50    This  is  not  to  say  that  impediments  to  development  that  can  arise  in  specific  contexts,  such  as  ethnic  division  and  instability  for  example,  are  not  acknowledged  as  an  important  mediator  in  the                                                                                                                  47  Jensen  and  Wantchekon,  ‘Resource  Wealth  and  Political  Regimes’,  pp.  834-­‐836.  48  Benjamin  Smith,  ‘Oil  Wealth  and  Regime  Survival  in  the  Developing  World,  1960-­‐1999’,  American  Journal  of  Political  Science,  Vol.  48,  No.  2,  2004,  pp.  235-­‐243.  49  Rosser,  The  Political  Economy  of  the  Resource  Curse,  p.  22  50  Ibid,  p.  23;  Watts,  Resource  Curse?’,  p.  75.     25  
    • relationship  between  natural  resource  abundance  and  the  nature  of  governance  in  these  countries.    But  too  often  they  are  seen  as  being  determined  by  the  resource  base,  rather  than  having  historical  roots  specific  to  each  country.51    In  order  to  understand  better  the  discrepancy  between  the  results  of  oil  exploitation  in  different  countries,  the  effects  of  oil  on  specific  social  and  political  factors  needs  to  be  explored.     Secondly,  the  shift  in  the  resource  curse  debate  towards  the  role  of  host  country  governance  has  left  the  literature  relatively  silent  on  issues  external  to  those  countries.52    One  such  issue,  which  will  also  be  focused  on  here,  is  the  role  of  global  energy  governance  in  precipitating,  extenuating,  and  perhaps  curing  the  resource  curse.    This  issue  will  be  addressed  in  the  following  section.    As  will  be  shown,  it  is  on  the  findings  of  the  resource  curse  literature,  at  least  in  part,  that  global  responses  have  been  based.    The  EITI  framework  is  the  current  global  governance  response  to  poor  development  outcomes  amongst  the  resource-­‐rich,  and  it  is  to  this  issue  and  its  associated  literature  that  we  now  turn.                                                                                                                    51  Rosser,  The  Political  Economy  of  the  Resource  Curse,  p.  10.    There  are  a  few  exceptions  to  this  neglect.    See  Gwenn  Okruhlik,  Rentier  Wealth,  Unruly  Law,  and  the  Rise  of  Opposition:  The  Political  Economy  of  Oil  States’,  Comparative  Politics,  31,  3,  1999,  p.  309,  who  points  out  that  the  character  of  state  institutions  are  mainly  shaped  prior  to  the  imposition  of  oil;  Watts,  ‘Resource  Curse?’,  pp.  53-­‐4,  who  argues  that  ‘petro-­‐capitalism’  produces  new  forms  of  rule  and  political  authority  as  it  interacts  with  pre-­‐existing  social  and  political  factors;  and  Kiren  Aziz  Chaudhry,  ‘Economic  Liberalization  and  the  Lineages  of  the  Rentier  State’,  Comparative  Politics,  Vol.  27,  No.  1,  1994,  p.  21,  who  argues  through  a  case  study  of  Saudi  and  Iraqi  reform  efforts  that  widely  different  results  will  be  experienced  in  similar  situations  due  to  local  characteristics.  52  Hilson  and  Maconachie,  ‘”Good  Governance”’,  p.  62.         26  
    •  Governance,  Transparency,  and  the  EITI     Global  energy  flows  have  historically  been  governed  by  a  patchwork  of  institutions  whose  overlapping  authority  and  jurisdiction  make  for  complicated  analysis.    Included  in  this  institutional  architecture  are  a  myriad  of  bilateral  agreements;  bodies  such  as  the  International  Energy  Agency  (IEA)  and  the  Group  of  Eight  (G8),  in  which  energy  exporters  are  grossly  underrepresented;  financial  institutions  such  as  the  World  Bank  (WB)  and  the  International  Monetary  Fund  (IMF),  which  provide  technical  and  financial  assistance  to  developing  countries;  poorly  regulated  and  heavily  distorted  markets;  and  weak  and  nonbinding  rule  systems  which  emanate  from  the  above  sources.53    Prior  to  the  emergence  of  transparency  as  an  international  norm,  this  fragmented  institutional  framework  was  largely  directed  towards  the  correction  of  market  failures,  the  lowering  of  transaction  costs,  and  the  regulation  of  market  exchange.54    Of  importance  to  those  involved  were  value-­‐free  realpolitik  concerns  about  the  security  of  energy  supply  and  price  stability.55    Such  calculations  were  especially  significant  in  the  case  of  oil  –  it  is  the  foremost  strategic  good,  the  backbone  of  modern  industrial                                                                                                                  53  It  is  beyond  the  purview  of  this  study  to  examine  these  institutions  in  full,  or  to  list  the  full  gamut  of  bodies  involved  in  global  energy  governance.    This  has  been  attempted  elsewhere  with  varying  success.  See  for  example  Ann  Florini  and  Benjamin  K.  Sovacool,  ‘Who  Governs  Energy?    The  Challenges  Facing  Global  Energy  Governance’,  Energy  Policy,  Vol.  37,  No.  12,  2009,  pp.  5239-­‐5248.  54  Andreas  Goldthau  et  al.,  Global  Energy  Governance:  The  Way  Forward’,  in  Andreas  Goldthau  and  Jan  Martin  Witte  (eds.),  Global  Energy  Governance:  The  New  Rules  of  the  Game,  Washington,  Brookings  Institution  Press,  2010,  p.  344.  55  Thorsten  Benner  and  Ricardo  Soares  de  Oliveira,  The  Good/Bad  Nexus  in  Global  Energy  Governance’,  in  Andreas  Goldthau  and  Jan  Martin  Witte  (eds.),  Global  Energy  Governance:  The  New  Rules  of  the  Game,  Washington,  Brookings  Institution  Press,  2010,  p.  287.     27  
    • economies,  and  hence  critical  to  the  maintenance  and  survival  of  the  state.56    Broader  issues  arising  from  energy  extraction  affecting  the  political,  social,  or  environmental  concerns  of  exporting  countries  were  treated  on  an  ad-­‐hoc  basis,  often  by  bodies  outside  of  the  energy  governance  framework.57    ‘Good’  or  ‘bad’  governance  within  this  framework  was  therefore  to  be  judged  primarily  in  economic  terms.58     This  narrow  geo-­‐political/geo-­‐economic  focus  of  global  energy  governance  has  been  reflected  in  the  literature  on  the  subject.    As  Ann  Florini  and  Benjamin  Sovacool  point  out,  insufficient  scholarly  attention  has  been  paid  to  the  patchwork  of  institutions  that  currently  make  up  the  global  energy  governance  framework,  or  to  the  conspicuous  institutional  gaps  that  exist  between  them.    Rather,  the  global  energy  governance  literature  is  focused  upon  either  the  ‘technological  or  economic  aspects  of  systems,  markets,  and  policy  decisions’,59  or  on  energy  security  in  the  context  of  shifting  geo-­‐political  landscapes.60    According  to  Andreas  Goldthau,  this  concentration  on  essentially  zero-­‐sum  games  diverts  attention  from  the  institutional  architecture  that  underpins  global  energy  governance.61                                                                                                                  56  Dries  Lesage  et  al.  Global  Energy  Governance  in  a  Mulitpolar  World,  Burlington,  Ashgate,  2010,  p.  183.    The  significance  of  maintaining  the  security  of  oil  supply  is  unlikely  to  diminish,  with  global  needs  to  rise  by  as  much  as  50%  by  2030,  assuming  no  drastic  changes  to  national  energy  policies.    Gillies,  ‘Reputational  Concerns’,  p.  107.  57  Florini  and  Sovacool,  ‘Who  Governs  Energy?’,  p.  5239.  58  Benner  and  Oliveira,  ‘The  Good/Bad  Nexus’,  p.  287.  59  Florini  and  Sovacool,  ‘Who  Governs  Energy?’,  p.  5240.  60  Included  here  are  China’s  “scramble  for  Africa”,  access  to  the  Caspian  Sea  gas  fields,  as  well  as  the  beginnings  of  the  race  for  the  Arctic.    See  Andreas  Goldthau  and  Jan  Martin  Witte,  The  Role  of  Rules  and  Institutions  in  Global  Energy:  An  Introduction’,  in  Andreas  Goldthau  and  Jan  Martin  Witte  (eds.),  Global  Energy  Governance:  The  New  Rules  of  the  Game,  Washington,  Brookings  Institute  Press,  2010,  pp.  1-­‐2.  61  Ibid,  pp.  1-­‐2.     28  
    •   During  the  preceding  two  decades  a  significant  normative  shift  has  occurred  at  the  global  level  towards  the  promotion  of  ‘good  governance’  and  transparency.62    Thorsten  Benner  and  Ricardo  de  Oliveira  delineate  four  key  factors  contributing  to  this  normative  shift  as  it  relates  to  oil-­‐sector  transparency  and  the  resource  curse.    Firstly,  the  failure  of  the  Washington  Consensus  policies  to  promote  economic  development  through  value-­‐free  structural  adjustment,  led  donor  agencies  to  link  bad  governance  to  developing  country  malaise.63    Secondly,  studies  linking  poor  governance  and  corrupt  practices  with  the  onset  of  the  resource  curse,  and  underdevelopment  more  generally,  gained  influence  amongst  international  institutions  during  the  1990s.    In  response,  bodies  such  as  the  G8  and  the  WB  began  to  re-­‐examine  the  role  of  the  extractive  industries  in  national  governance  failure.    Thirdly,  corruption  emerged  as  a  key  global  concern,  in  part  due  to  pressure  exerted  on  the  international  community  by  Non-­‐Governmental  Organizations  (NGOs)  such  as  Transparency  International  (TI).64    Lastly,  the  exploitive  behaviour  of  corporate  multinationals  in  developing  countries,  perceived  or  actual,  came  under  scrutiny,  and  led  to  calls  for  stricter  regulation  and  industry  governance.65    The  EITI,  with  its  underlying  normative  dimensions  of  transparency  and  ‘good’  governance,  stands  at  the  confluence  of                                                                                                                  62  Gillies,  ‘Reputational  Concerns’,  p.  103-­‐105.  63  Though  rather  than  being  the  content  of  the  reforms  per  se,  it  was  felt  that  weak  and  corruptible  public  institutions  serve  to  block  real  structural  reform.    As  such  it  became  necessary  for  external  actors  to  promote  good  governance  in  domestic  settings.    Ibid,  p.  291.  64  Prior  to  the  1990s  corruption  was  barely  on  the  global  agenda,  and  indeed  bribes  were  tax  deductible  for  many  European  officials  who  operated  in  foreign  markets.    Ibid,  291.    For  an  examination  of  the  role  of  various  NGOs  in  bringing  the  eradication  of  corruption  to  the  forefront  of  the  global  agenda  see  Gillies,  ‘Reputational  Concerns’,  pp.  109-­‐110.    65  Benner  and  Oliveira,  ‘The  Good/Bad  Nexus’,  pp.  290-­‐292.     29  
    • these  concerns,  and  has  become  the  key  policy  response  to  the  resource  curse  and  ‘bad  governance’.66         A  fifth  and  arguably  critical  factor  may  be  added  to  this  list.    As  several  analysts  have  argued,  the  role  of  the  reputational  agendas  of  multinational  oil  companies,  international  financial  institutions,  and  many  Western  governments  were  decisive  in  the  emergence  of  oil-­‐sector  transparency  as  an  international  norm  for  the  extractive  industries.67    For  the  emergence  of  the  EITI  deflected  attention  and  scrutiny  away  from  these  bodies  at  the  very  time  their  responsibility  for  the  resource  curse  was  being  questioned,  and  towards  the  host  governments  as  the  source  of  economic  mismanagement  and  corruption.68    The  multinationals,  for  their  part,  supported  the  EITI’s  entrance  in  forums  such  as  the  G8  and,  as  Nicholas  Shaxson  has  argued,  ‘love  the  EITI  –  it  takes  pressure  off  them  and  puts  it  onto  African  governments  to  disclose.’69    The  EITI  was  thus  attractive  to  multinationals,  international  institutions  and  Western  governments  alike,  and  received  support  for  its  usefulness  in  protecting  their  public  images.70     Supporters  of  the  EITI,  including  international  institutions  and  various  NGOs,  argue  that  it  has  been  a  great  success.    Peter  Eigen,  the  body’s  inaugural  chairman,  points  to  its  global  acceptance  rate,  which  as  of  2009  included  twenty-­‐three  candidate  countries  in  Africa,  Asia  and  Latin  America,  as  well  as  the                                                                                                                  66  Virginia  Haufler,  Disclosure  as  Governance:  The  Extractive  Industries  Transparency  Initiative  and  Resource  Management  in  the  Developing  World’,  Global  Environmental  Politics,  Vol.  10,  No.  3,  2010,  p.  54.    67  Gilles,  ‘Reputational  Concerns’,  p.  115;  see  also  Hilson  and  Maconachie,  ‘“Good  Governance”’,  pp.  55-­‐76.    68  Ibid,  p.  55.  69  Shaxson,  Poisoned  Wells,  p.  218.  70  Gillies,  ‘Reputational  Concerns’,  p.  104.     30  
    • endorsement  of  thirty-­‐seven  oil,  gas  and  mining  companies  worldwide,  and  numerous  NGOs.71    Proponents  argue  that,  within  countries  compliant  with  the  framework,  the  EITI  will  ‘help  civil  society  groups  to  work  towards  a  democratic  debate  over  the  effective  use  and  allocation  of  resource  revenues  and  public  finance’  by  empowering  host  country  populations  through  knowledge  dissemination.72    Armed  with  information,  civil  society  will  force  greater  accountability,  reduced  corruption  and  mismanagement,  and  state/society  cooperation,  while  also  increasing  state  legitimacy  and  strengthening  public  institutions.73     Yet,  as  Mark  Fenster  rightly  points  out,  herein  lies  the  weakness  of  transparency  initiatives  such  as  the  EITI.    They  rely  on  a  ‘simplistic  model  of  linear  communication  that  assumes  that  information,  once  set  free  from  the  state  that  creates  it,  will  produce  an  informed,  engaged  public  that  will  hold  officials  responsible.’74    As  many  critics  of  the  EITI  have  pointed  out,  the  citizenry  of  a  corruption-­‐rich  state  is  often  already  well  aware  of  the  corrupt  practices  of  state  actors  past  and  present.75    Moreover,  their  civil  society  organizations  are  often  severely  lacking  in  political  power.    For  this  reason,  the  recent  pressure  for                                                                                                                  71  Peter  Eigen,  A  Coalition  to  Combat  Corruption:  TI,  EITI,  and  Civil  Society’,  in  Robert  I.  Rotberg  (ed.),  Corruption,  Global  Security,  and  World  Order,  Washington,  D.C.,  Brookings  Institute  Press,  2009,  p.  426.  72  Quoted  in  Haufler,  ‘Disclosure  as  Governance’,  p.  59.  73  Ibid,  p.  54.  74  Mark  Fenster,  The  Opacity  of  Transparency’,  in  Iowa  Law  Review,  Vol.  91,  No.  3,  2006,  p.  885.  75  See  for  example,  Yinka  O.  Omorobge,  Alternative  Regulation  and  Governance  Reform  in  Resource-­‐Rich  Developing  Countries  of  Africa’,  in  Barry  Barton  et  al.  (eds.),  Regulating  Energy  and  Natural  Resources,  New  York,  Oxford  University  Press,  2006,  p.  55;  Benner  and  Oliveira  ‘The  Good/Bad  Nexus’,  p.  303;  and  Haufler,  ‘Disclosure  as  Governance’,  pp.  55-­‐56.     31  
    • transparency  and  reform  of  corruption  has  largely  originated  from  external  sources  rather  than  the  agitation  of  citizens.76         Nonetheless,  western  donor  organizations  and  NGOs  still  bemoan  the  failure  of  top-­‐down  efforts  to  provoke  significant  grass-­‐root  action,  or  produce  lasting  results.77    For  Shaxson  this  speaks  of  a  simplistic  and  externally  derived  definition  of  corruption:  ‘individual  misuse  of  public  resources  for  private  gain’.    Such  a  definition  underestimates  the  systemic  nature  of  corruption  in  many  countries.78    As  Martin  Wolf,  a  Financial  Times  columnist  put  it,  ‘in  a  society  when  everyone  cheats  and  takes  or  pays  bribes,  there  is  little  incentive  not  to  join  in’.79     If  there  is  an  overriding  consensus  in  the  literature  critical  of  the  EITI  as  an  effective  governance  mechanism,  it  is  that  significant  institutional  and  cultural  change  within  host  countries  must  precede  its  implementation.    The  literature  argues  that  without  such  prior  and  wholesale  changes,  external  reform  of  one  part  of  the  problem  will  do  little  other  than  mask  the  underlying  issues.80    For  the  changes  the  EITI  aims  to  make  exist  at  a  ‘superficial  or  rhetorical’  level  and,  while  challenging  the  history  of  global  energy  governance,  does  not  attempt  deeper  structural  and  cultural  change.81                                                                                                                        76  Ibid,  p.  70.  77  Nicholas  Shaxson,  ‘Oil,  Corruption  and  the  Resource  Curse’,  in  International  Affairs,  Vol.  83,  No.  6,  2007,  p.  1134.  78  Ibid,  p.  1125.  79  Quoted  in  ibid,  p.  1126.  80  See  Hilson  and  Maconachie,  ‘”Good  Governance”’,  p.    58.  81  Benner  and  Oliveira,  ‘The  Good/Bad  Nexus’,  pp.  309-­‐10.     32  
    • To  summarize,  the  main  argument  of  this  literature  review  is  that  resource  curse  analysis  of  country  specific  social  and  political  factors  is  seriously  lacking.    So  too  is  an  understanding  of  how  those  factors  may  affect  external  reform  measures  such  as  the  EITI  aimed  at  curing  the  curse.    The  aim  here  is  to  add  to  this  literature  through  an  in-­‐depth  case  study  of  Nigeria  and  its  resource  curse  in  order  to  ascertain  to  what  degree  Nigerian  social  and  political  factors  have  entrenched  the  resource  curse  in  that  country,  and  hence  demand  wholesale  structural  and  cultural  change.         33  
    •  Chapter  3:    The  Slide  into  the  Resource  Curse     Any  analysis  of  the  social  and  political  factors  affecting  modern  Nigeria  must  begin  with  its  pre-­‐colonial  and  colonial  history.     The  imposition  of  colonial  rule  in  Nigeria,  occurring  in  the  late  nineteenth-­‐century,  was  preceded  by  centuries  of  economic  and  cultural  interaction  between  Europeans  and  the  indigenous  population.82    Predominately  this  took  the  form  of  the  slave  trade,  conducted  through  native  intermediaries  along  the  West  African  coast,  which  would  see  several  million  people  forcibly  removed  to  the  plantations  of  America,  South  America,  and  the  West  Indies,  between  the  fifteenth  and  mid  nineteenth-­‐centuries.83    During  this  period  the  slave  trade  became  central  to  the  economies  of  several  of  the  states  and  societies  of  what  became  Nigeria,  and  came  to  underpin  their  political  stability  and  economic  might.84    Indeed,  the  slave  trade  was  instrumental  in  the  emergence  of  three  large  and  centralized  states,  ethnically  based,  which  would  come  to                                                                                                                  82  Philip  Terdoo  Ahire,  Imperial  Policing:  The  Emergence  and  Role  of  the  Police  in  Colonial  Nigeria,  1860-­‐1960,  Philadelphia,  Open  University  Press,  1991,  p.  1-­‐2.  83  Oronto  Douglas  and  Ike  Okonta,  Where  Vultures  Feast:  Shell,  Human  Rights,  and  Oil  in  the  Niger  Delta,  San  Francisco,  Sierra  Club  Books,  2001,  pp.  6-­‐7.    Though  the  trade  was  outlawed  in  Britain  in  1807,  it  would  continue  illegally  until  around  1850.    Oladimeji  Aborisade  and  Robert  J.  Mundt,  Politics  in  Nigeria,  New  York,  Longman,  1998,  p.  6-­‐7.  84  Slavery  as  an  institution  had  existed  in  the  area  that  would  form  Nigeria  prior  to  1500,  but  slaves  tended  to  be  assimilated  into  their  new  community,  and  it  existed  alongside  different  forms  of  social  bondage  related  to  social  and  political  interaction.    See  Toyin  Falola  and  Matthew  M.  Heaton,  A  History  of  Nigeria,  Cambridge,  Cambridge  University  Press,  2008,  pp.  40-­‐45.     34  
    • dominate  the  Nigerian  political  and  economic  landscape,  and  thus  greatly  affect  the  federated  structure  of  the  post-­‐colonial  state.85         Located  in  the  northern,  western  and  eastern  regions  of  Nigeria  respectively,  these  peoples  were  wholly  distinct  in  their  social  and  political  structures.    In  the  North,  the  Hausa-­‐Fulani  lived  in  a  hierarchal,  even  feudal,  society,  which  after  the  Fulani  jihad  of  the  early  nineteenth-­‐century  was  formed  into  a  caliphate  under  the  Sultan  of  Sokoto.    The  Sultan  was  represented  in  the  provinces  by  emirs,  who  ruled  a  society  split  between  the  sarakuna  (ruling)  and  talakawa  (commoner)  classes,  a  status  ascribed  at  birth.    In  the  West,  Yoruba  pre-­‐colonial  society  was,  like  the  Hausa-­‐Fulani,  hierarchical  in  nature,  though  perhaps  not  as  authoritarian  as  their  northern  neighbours.    The  monarchs  (Oba)  though  divinely  appointed,  did  not  have  absolute  power  over  the  chieftaincy  or  ruling  council,  whose  hereditary  status  precluded  arbitrary  dismissal.86    Conflict  and  competition  were  ubiquitous,  leading  to  inherent  instability.    In  the  East,  the  Igbo,  by  contrast,  were  organized  around  federated  democratic  norms  that  we  might  recognize  today.    Each  autonomous  village  contained  an  assembly,  made  up  of  adult  males  and  some  prominent  women,  where  open  and  free  debate  on  issues  took  place.    Representatives  would  be  elected  for  the  village,  but  there  were  no  centralizing  or  kingship  institutions  prior  to  the  colonial  period.87    The  establishment  of  British  colonial  dominance  would  result  in  the  forced  restructuring  of  these  political  and  social  institutions,  particularly  in  the  western                                                                                                                  85  Ibid,  pp.  59-­‐60.  86  Those  in  the  ruling  council  could  only  be  of  non-­‐royal  lineage.    Funso  Afolayan,  ‘Nigeria:  A  Political  Entity  and  a  Society’,  in  Paul  A.  Beckett  and  Crawford  Young  (eds.),  Dilemmas  of  Democracy  in  Nigeria,  Rochester,  University  of  Rochester  Press,  1997,  p.  53.  87  Ibid,  pp.  52-­‐54.    See  also  Falola,  A  History  of  Nigeria,  pp.  21-­‐29.     35  
    • and  eastern  regions,  such  that  they  could  accommodate  colonial  ‘indirect  rule’  systems.88     It  was  Britain’s  attack  on  the  supply  side  of  the  slave  trade  coupled  with  the  ‘legitimate’  trade  in  another  form  of  oil,  palm  oil,  which  led  to  a  settled  British  presence  to  Nigeria.89    Palm  oil,  used  in  the  lubrication  of  machinery,  and  in  the  production  of  soaps  and  margarine,  was  in  high  demand,  and  in  high  supply.90    The  trading  patterns  established  by  the  slave  trade  were  essentially  reproduced,  although  recalcitrant  native  traders  had  to  be  displaced,  thereby  creating  interference  in  local  politics.    Some  local  populations  resisted  and  some  were  violently  suppressed  by  the  British  representatives.91    As  the  level  of  profitability  in  the  region  became  clear,  and  the  need  for  order  became  more  apparent,  the  British  moved  towards  outright  control,  beginning  with  the  creation  of  the  Lagos  colony  in  1861,  and  leading  to  the  annexation  of  the  Niger  Delta  and  its  hinterland  under  the  Oil  Rivers  Protectorate  in  1885.92         With  the  coastal  areas  now  under  control  and,  under  missionary  influence  embracing  Christianity,  the  British  sought  to  expand  their  influence  inland.    Wary  of  the  similarly  expansionist  policies  of  the  French  and  Germans  in  West  Africa,  the  British  forcibly  spread  their  political  interests  across  the  Yoruba  and                                                                                                                  88  Falola  and  Heaton,  A  History  of  Nigeria,  pp.  113-­‐116.  89  Ahire,  Imperial  Policing,  pp.  2-­‐4.  90  The  port  of  Bonny,  a  coastal  Ijo  town  and  the  richest  port  in  the  Delta  was  exporting  more  than  25,000  tonnes  of  palm  oil  a  year  by  1856.    Douglas  and  Okonta,  Where  Vultures  Feast,  pp.  6-­‐7.      91  Aborisade  and  Mundt,  Politics  in  Nigeria,  pp.  6-­‐7.  92  The  annexation  was  on  the  pretext,  according  to  the  Foreign  Office,  ‘to  protect  and  develop  the  important  trade  of  which  their  town  is  the  sear;  and  to  exercise  influence  on  the  surrounding  tribes’.    Douglas  and  Okonta,  Where  Vultures  Feast,  pp.  8-­‐10.         36  
    • Igbo  states  through  a  series  of  ‘small  wars’,  a  euphemism  for  the  brutal  seizure  of  territory.93    By  1897,  the  renamed  Niger  Coast  Protectorate  had  joined  the  Lagos  colony  and  stretched  across  Southern  Nigeria.94    In  order  to  gain  supremacy  in  the  region,  short  of  complete  colonial  take-­‐over,  the  British  Government  had  entrusted  its  interests  to  the  Royal  Niger  Company95  of  George  Taubmann  Goldie,  the  ‘founder  of  modern  Nigeria’,  by  way  of  a  Royal  Charter  granted  in  1886.96         In  exchange  for  a  monopoly  of  trade  and  political  control,  the  company  was  to  negotiate  ‘treaties’  with  local  rulers,  which  were  secured  through  coercion,  including  the  bombardment  and  razing  of  towns  that  dared  to  resist.  97    Once  control  of  an  area  was  ensured,  the  company  would  establish  judicial  and  political  institutions,  structures  upon  which  the  colonial  state  would  be  built.98    In  1899,  however,  with  the  palm  oil  trade  now  worth  £3.4  million  per  year,  and  accusations  of  maladministration  by  the  company  continually  surfacing,  the  British  government  instituted  direct  colonial  rule  over  southern  Nigeria.99     Attention  now  moved  to  the  newly  created  Protectorate  of  Northern  Nigeria,  ruled  by  the  Sokoto  Caliphate.    Under  the  command  of  Frederick  Lugard,                                                                                                                  93  ‘Small  wars’  were  conducted  through  attrition  and  the  destruction  of  anything  of  value  in  order  to  intimidate  into  submission.    For  example,  the  village  of  Satiru  was  set  on  fire  in  1903,  with  a  curse  placed  upon  its  site  to  ward  off  rebuilding.    Toyin  Falola,  Colonialism  and  Violence  in  Nigeria,  Bloomington,  Indiana  University  Press,  1999,  pp.  174-­‐175.  94  Falola  and  Heaton,  A  History  of  Nigeria,  p.  98.  95  Previously  known  as  the  National  African  Company,  but  would  be  renamed  following  the  granting  of  the  Charter,  and  the  amalgamation  of  three  other  companies  operating  in  the  area.    Ibid,  p.  98.  96  Ibid,  p.  99.  97  Douglas  and  Okonta,  Where  Vultures  Feast,  pp.  13-­‐14.  98  Ahire,  Imperial  Policing,  p.  10.  99  Douglas  and  Heaton,  Where  Vultures  Feast,  p.  16.     37  
    • who  would  later  became  the  first  Governor  of  unified  Nigeria,  the  British  military  led  a  series  of  offensives  against  the  North,  culminating  in  the  battlefield  death  of  the  caliph  in  July  1903.100    Once  the  caliph  was  deposed,  the  British  administration  under  Lugard  and  his  successors  supplanted  the  caliph’s  authority  over  the  emirs  with  their  own,  instituting  a  policy  of  indirect  rule.    Under  the  British,  however,  the  economy  floundered  and  became  reliant  on  aid  from  the  South.    In  order  to  better  centralize  revenue  allocation  and  bring  about  wider  economic  integration,  the  Northern  and  Southern  Protectorates  were  amalgamated  in  1914  to  form  a  unified  Nigeria.101    The  Colonial  Project     Prior  to  1914,  the  nominal  indirect  rule  policy  of  the  colonial  administration  varied  significantly  in  operation  depending  on  local  conditions.    In  principle  both  areas  were  to  be  ruled  according  to  the  Dual  Mandate  –  obtaining  advantage  for  the  home  country,  while  leaving  indigenous  structures  intact  so  that  Africans  could  be  ‘civilized’  gradually.    The  existing  feudal  authority  system  in  the  North  allowed  the  British  to  apply  the  policy  of  indirect  rule,  which  saved  costs  by  ‘employing’  the  emirs  to  govern  through  their  existing  institutions.102    In  the  South,  however,  the  British  had  to  be  more  directly  involved  in  the  running  of  the  Protectorate  due  to  a  lack  of  readymade  authoritarian  political  structures.    The  traditional  institutions  had  to  be                                                                                                                  100  Falola  and  Heaton,  A  History  of  Nigeria,  p.  93.  101  The  Lagos  colony  and  the  Niger  Coast  Protectorate  had  been  amalgamated  in  1906  to  form  the  Protectorate  of  Southern  Nigeria.    Ibid,  p.  117.  102  Kalu  Ndukwe  Kalu,  State  Power,  Autarchy,  and  Political  Conquest  in  Nigerian  Federalism,  Lanham,  Lexington  Books,  2008,  p.  34.     38  
    • significantly  restructured  to  accommodate  colonial  rule.103    Although  Lugard  would  extend  his  form  of  indirect  rule  across  Nigeria  following  its  amalgamation  into  a  single  administrative  unit,  the  two  areas  were  already  on  different  paths,  with  the  South  being  far  more  Europeanized  than  its  northern  neighbours.104     The  ideology  that  underpinned  the  imposition  of  colonial  rule,  regardless  of  its  ‘indirect’  nature,  rested  upon  the  perception  of  African  culture  and  society  as  backward  in  relation  to  its  European  counterpart.    The  British  colonialists  presented  their  role  in  Nigeria  as  one  of  assisting  in  the  elevation  of  indigenous  society  to  European  levels,  while  maintaining  existent  structures,  rather  than  of  exploitation  and  domination  for  their  own  gain.105        In  reality,  however,  the  drive  behind  colonization  included  the  exploitation  of  Nigerian  natural  resources  for  the  furtherance  of  industrial  aims  in  Britain.    The  economy  was  directed  towards  primary  production,  which  utilized  unskilled  labour  and  discouraged  industrial  development,  leading  to  far  reaching  consequences,  such  as  the  overreliance  on  one  crop  or  product.106    The  material  benefits  of  this  economic  structure  flowed  heavily  towards  the  colonialists  and  a  select  group  of  European  educated  indigenous  elites  while  the  majority  of  the  population  were  alienated  and                                                                                                                  103  Joseph  A.  Umoren,  Democracy  and  Ethnic  Diversity  in  Nigeria,  Lanham,  University  Press  of  America,  1996,  p.  66.  104  Falola  and  Heaton,  A  History  of  Nigeria,  p.  116.    For  example,  Lugard  had  forbidden  the  entrance  of  missionaries  into  the  North,  arguing  that  such  action  was  required  to  preserve  traditional  cultures.  In  the  South,  where  missionaries  established  a  system  of  Christian  education,  which  involved  among  other  factors  the  imposition  of  the  English  language,  an  educated  middle-­‐class  had  already  begun  to  evolve.    As  a  result,  with  access  to  education  being  far  more  limited,  the  North  fell  behind,  a  source  of  resentment  still  prevalent  today.    Umoren,  Democracy  and  Ethnicity,  pp.  67-­‐68.  105  Ahire,  Imperial  Policing,  p.  17.  106  Ibid,  p.  19.       39  
    • suppressed,  forced  into  exploitative  labour,  and  to  live  under  the  influence  of  policies  which  they  felt  degraded  and  eroded  traditional  structures.107     Not  surprisingly,  the  imposition  of  colonial  rule  in  Nigeria  spurred  resistance  movements  from  the  outset.    Initially  these  movements  were  for  the  most  part  successfully  suppressed  by  the  colonial  administration.108      Moreover,  where  resistance  movements  did  arise,  they  tended  to  be  ethnically  or  spatially  based,  precluding  a  pan-­‐Nigerian  movement  for  change.    From  the  1930s  onwards,  however,  broad  based  anti-­‐colonial  movements,  united  by  a  desire  for  Nigerian  involvement  in  governance,  began  to  emerge.    They  successfully  pressured  the  colonial  administration  to  undertake  constitutional  reform,  leading  to  elite  involvement,  especially  in  regional  governance,  and  eventually  to  outright  independence  on  1  October  1960.    Yet,  despite  the  feeling  of  unity  during  the  initial  stages  of  independence  the  country  was  still  divided  along  ethnic  and  religious  lines,  leaving  the  foundations  of  the  new  Nigerian  state  weak  as  a  consequence.109      From  Euphoria  to  Civil  War     Despite  the  outpouring  of  euphoria  at  the  time  of  independence,  three  significant  factors  intersected  with  the  reality  of  division,  and  almost  immediately  began  to  undermine  the  promising  prospects  of  the  First  Republic.    Firstly,  the  federated  structure  of  the  new  state  did  little  to  solve  what  would                                                                                                                  107  Falola  and  Heaton,  A  History  of  Nigerian,  p.  136.  108  Falola,  Colonialism  and  Violence,  p.  171.  109  Falola  and  Heaton,  A  History  of  Nigeria,  pp.  136-­‐137.     40  
    • become  known  as  the  ‘national  question’  -­‐  how  to  engender  a  unified  national  consciousness  out  of  ethnic  and  religious  differences  compounded  by  political  ambitions  and  economic  disparities.    The  regional  emphasis  of  the  new  Constitution  ensured  that  national  power  was  determined  by  control  at  the  regional  level.    Thus,  the  Hausa-­‐Fulani,  the  Yoruba,  and  the  Igbo  came  to  dominate  their  regions  and  the  contest  for  control  of  the  federated  state.    Minorities  within  those  regions,  fearful  of  domination  by  the  majority,  became  alienated  from  the  political  process.    As  such,  an  already  fractured  nation,  created  artificially,  began  to  fragment  further  within  a  supposedly  unified  nation  state.110         Secondly,  the  direct  importation  of  the  British  Westminster  system  of  government  ensured  northern  and  Muslim  domination  of  the  new  legislature.111    Favoured  by  a  much  larger  population,  confirmed  by  the  1952-­‐3  census,  the  Northern  People’s  Congress  (NPC)  would  achieve  outright  majority  during  the  1959  parliamentary  elections.    Drawing  its  membership  primarily  from  the  Katsina  College,  established  by  the  British  for  the  education  of  the  former  elite  of  the  Sokoto  Caliphate,  the  NPC  represented  the  most  pro-­‐British  and  conservative  forces  in  the  country.    As  a  result,  independence  constituted  a  mere  ‘cosmetic                                                                                                                  110  Ibid,  pp.  158-­‐159.  111  It  is  an  enduring  myth  that  Africa  had  no  viable  institutions  of  its  own  prior  to  the  arrival  of  the  colonists.    As  Ayittey  points  out,  this  confusion  stems  from  the  inability  to  differentiate  between  the  existence  of  a  particular  institution,  and  the  various  forms  it  can  take.    Thus  are  shopping  malls  and  bazaars  part  of  the  same  phenomenon  of  the  market.    George  B.  Ayittey,  Africa  in  Chaos,  New  York,  St.  Martins  Press,  1998,  p.  85.    Importantly  though,  the  importation  of  the  Westminster  System  was  supported  by  many  in  the  Nigerian  elite  owing  to  a  belief  that  it  would  hasten  the  withdrawal.  Robert  T.  Suberu,  ‘Institutions,  Political  Culture,  and  Constitutionalism  in  Nigeria’,  in  Michael  J.  Baun  and  Daniel  P.  Franklin  (eds.),  Political  Culture  and  Constitutionalism:  A  Comparative  Approach,  Armonk,  M.E.  Sharpe,  1995,  pp.  197-­‐198.     41  
    • change’  from  colonial  rule,  encouraging  the  withdrawal  of  the  Yoruba  and  Igbo  elite  from  a  commitment  to  a  ‘Nigerian’  state.112     Thirdly,  the  Nigerian  elites  taking  control  of  state  apparatuses  maintained  a  regional  political  and  social  orientation,  and  an  adherence  to  traditional  patrimonial  relationships.    They  often  looked  upon  those  apparatuses  as  a  source  of  personal  and  communal  accumulation,  especially  where  capital  was  scarce.113    Almost  immediately  federal  funds  were  diverted  to  clients  at  the  regional/local  level,  draining  the  state’s  coffers  and  severely  undermining  its  legitimacy.  Corruption  would  thus  become  endemic  during  the  First  Republic,  a  situation  that  would  only  worsen  with  the  beginning  of  the  oil  boom,  and  the  subsequent  influx  of  immense  oil  rents.    Such  behaviour,  along  with  the  impending  fragmentation  of  the  state,  would  provide  the  military  with  a  ready  excuse  to  usurp  the  democratic  government.114     It  is  little  wonder  that  the  First  Republic  lasted  a  mere  six  years.    Unable  to  solve  the  ‘national  question’,  a  recurring  theme  throughout  modern  Nigerian  history,  and  replete  with  instability  and  corruption,  the  civilian  government  was  replaced  by  successive  military  coups.    The  first  occurred  on  15  January  1966,  and  was  led  by  the  ‘five  majors’,115  drawn  from  each  of  the  three  regions  of                                                                                                                  112  Toure  Kazah-­‐Toure,  ‘Nigeria:  Challenges  to  the  State  and  Ways  of  Breaking  Through  the  Quagmire’,  in  George  Klay  Kieh,  Jnr.  (ed.),  Beyond  State  Failure  and  Collapse:  Making  the  State  Relevant  in  Africa,  Lanham,  Lexington  Books,  2007,  p.  153.  113  Axel  Harneit-­‐Sievers,  Constructions  of  Belonging:  Igbo  Communities  and  the  Nigerian  State  in  the  Twentieth-­‐Century,  Rochester,  University  of  Rochester  Press,  2006,  p.  90.  114  Osoba,  ‘Corruption  in  Nigeria’,  p.  375.  115  Kaduna  Nzeogwu,  E.  Ifeajuna,  D.  Okafor,  C.  I.  Anuforo,  and  A.  Ademoyega  were  later  known  as  the  ‘five  majors’,  but  power  would  eventually  devolve  to  Major  General  John  Aguiyi-­‐Ironsi,  albeit  briefly.    Falola  and  Heaton,  A  History  of  Nigeria,  p.  172.     42  
    • Nigeria.    Many  in  the  North,  however,  came  to  see  the  coup  as  part  of  a  southern  Igbo  conspiracy,  and  on  29  July  1966,  a  northern  Lieutenant  Colonel,  Yakubu  Gowan,  gained  control  of  the  country  following  a  successful  counter-­‐coup.    Another  Lieutenant  Colonel  and  commander  of  the  Eastern  region,  Chukwuemeka  Odumegwu-­‐Ojukwu,  fearing  for  the  safety  of  the  Igbo  in  the  aftermath  of  the  coups,  and  distrustful  of  Gowan,  declared  the  east  independent  under  the  new  state  of  the  Independent  Republic  of  Biafra.    Not  willing  to  allow  the  region  to  secede,  partly  due  to  the  presence  within  it  of  67  percent  of  known  petroleum  reserves,  Gowan  plunged  Nigeria  into  a  civil  war  that  would  last  four  destructive  years.116    Clearly  there  were  countless  issues  contributing  to  the  descent  into  civil  war,  but  oil  certainly  provided  an  extra  ingredient.117    In  the  aftermath  of  the  war  Nigeria  remained  unified,  at  least  in  name,  and  the  military,  as  corrupt  as  their  democratic  predecessors,  and  operating  with  little  regard  for  the  public  they  ruled,  continued  their  dominance  of  the  state.118        The  Arrival  of  Oil  Wealth     The  evolution  of  the  Nigerian  oil  industry  began  many  years  prior  to  the  oil  booms  of  the  1970s  and  early  80s.    In  1908  the  German-­‐owned  Nigerian  Butimen  Company  attempted  several  well  drills  without  success,  leading  to  a  hiatus  in  exploration  until  1937.    In  that  year  the  British  government  granted  Shell  D’Arcy  concessions  totalling  357,000  square  miles,  equal  to  the  entire                                                                                                                  116  Ibid,  pp.  172-­‐175.  117  Scott  Pearson,  Petroleum  and  the  Nigerian  Economy,  Stanford,  Stanford  University  Press,  1970,  pp.  138-­‐139.  118  Falola  and  Heaton,  A  History  of  Nigeria,  pp.  175-­‐176.     43  
    • territory  of  Nigeria.119  Though  interrupted  by  hostilities  during  World  War  II,  Shell  D’Arcy  had  by  1951  successfully  used  seismic  data  to  confirm  that  the  Niger  Delta  was  the  most  likely  area  for  oil  extraction.    Further  exploration  narrowed  the  target  area  so  that  by  1962  the  company  had  obtained  46  oil-­‐mining  leases  over  territory  covering  15,000  square  miles.120    The  first  successful  well  was  drilled  by  Shell  in  Oloibiri,  around  65  miles  to  the  west  of  Port  Harcourt,  in  1956.    Four  further  wells  were  drilled  by  1957,  and  exports  would  commence  the  following  year.121    With  several  other  companies  conducting  their  own  explorations,  and  exponential  rises  in  exploitation  capacities,  the  Nigerian  oil  industry  would  see  an  extraordinary  jump  in  production  from  just  5,100  barrels  per  day  in  1958,  to  2.4  million  in  2006.122     This  rapid  rise  in  oil  production  soon  corresponded  with  two  periods  of  rapidly  increasing  world  oil  prices.    The  oil  shocks  of  1971-­‐1973,  and  1980-­‐1981,  led  to  phenomenal  rises  in  oil  income  across  producing  nations.    In  Nigeria  the  boom  saw  oil  revenue  jump  from  $US1.2  billion  in  1972,  to  $US6.6  billion  in  1975,  and  then  following  a  plateau  in  prices,  to  $US25.4  billion  in  1980.123    Meanwhile,  the  military  government  had  made  progressive  moves  towards  ownership,  if  not  control,  of  the  oil  industry  and  the  profits  emanating  from  it,                                                                                                                  119  Shell  D’Arcy  was  a  joint  venture  between  Shell  and  British  Petroleum.    Douglas  and  Okonta,  Where  Vultures  Feast,  23.  120  Soala  Ariweriokuma,  The  Political  Economy  of  Oil  and  Gas  in  Africa:  The  Case  of  Nigeria,  New  York,  Routledge,  2008,  p.  23.  121  Nigerian  crude  oil  would  first  be  exported  to  European  oil  refineries  in  1958.    Ibid,  p.  25.  122  For  an  in  depth  history  of  the  various  companies  involved  in  extraction  in  Nigeria  see  ibid,  pp.  23-­‐25.  123  George  Philip,  The  Political  Economy  of  International  Oil,  Edinburgh,  Edinburgh  University  Press,  1994,  p.  174.     44  
    • under  the  Nigerian  National  Petroleum  Corporation  (NNPC).124    With  the  boom  came  extensive  national  development  plans  and  investment  in  all  manner  of  infrastructure  projects.    Unfortunately,  the  boom  proved  unsustainable,  and  following  a  collapse  in  world  prices,  oil  revenue  would  reach  only  $US7  billion  in  1986.125    At  the  same  time,  Nigeria’s  agricultural  industry  suffered  sluggish  growth,  with  urban  construction  and  a  growing  informal  sector  drawing  the  young  away  from  the  rural  economy.126  The  state,  having  become  dependent  on  oil  revenues  for  its  spending,  turned  to  extensive  international  borrowing  programs.    The  growing  debt  burden,  combined  with  poorly  conceived  structural  adjustment  policies,  would  plunge  the  country  into  a  recession  lasting  until  1992  causing  plummeting  standards  of  living.127         Oil  had  been  received  as  a  gift  from  providence,  a  wealth  that  could  reunite  the  nation  after  the  civil  war.    Nigeria  was  remade  in  the  ‘image  of  a  highly  valued  commodity  form’  as  centralized  rent  distribution  led  to  destructive  state-­‐fetishism.128    Yet  the  gains  were  not  distributed  evenly,  benefiting  primarily  those  with  access  to  state  power.    Prior  to  the  boom  years  of  the  1970s,  revenue  allocation  in  Nigeria  had  been  based  upon  the  derivation  principle;  that                                                                                                                  124  The  Nigerian  National  Petroleum  Corporation,  which  today  controls  the  Nigerian  industry,  was  created  in  April  1977  with  the  amalgamation  of  the  Nigerian  National  Oil  Corporation  (established  in  1971  following  the  joining  of  the  Organization  of  Petroleum  Exporting  Countries  (OPEC))  and  the  Ministry  of  Petroleum  Resources.    The  intention  of  these  bodies  was  to  ensure  the  participation  of  the  Nigerian  state  in  oil  exploration  and  production.    Having  become  heavily  involved  in  joint  ventures,  production  sharing  contracts,  and  service  contracts,  it  has  largely  succeeded  in  this  goal.    Ibid,  pp.  56-­‐57.    In  1979,  General  Olusegun  Obasanjo  would  nationalize  large  parts  of  the  oil  industry.    Falola  and  Heaton,  A  History  of  Nigeria,  p.  196.  125  Philip,  The  Political  Economy  of  International  Oil,  p.  174.  126  Watts,  ‘Resource  Curse?’,  pp.  74-­‐75.  127  Falola  and  Heaton,  A  History  of  Nigeria,  pp.  203-­‐205.  128  Andrew  H.  Apter,  The  Pan-­‐African  Nation:  Oil  and  the  Spectacle  of  Culture  in  Nigeria,  Chicago,  University  of  Chicago  Press,  2005,  p.  22.     45  
    • is,  resource-­‐producing  areas  were  to  receive  the  largest  share  of  revenues.    Progressive  changes  in  this  formula  led  to  its  complete  reversal  by  1982,  with  55  percent  going  to  federal  coffers,  35  percent  to  the  states,  and  10  percent  to  local  governments.    Funds  that  could  have  been  used  in  welfare  or  environmental  protection  measures  for  the  oil  producing  regions  were  diverted  elsewhere.129    Often  these  funds  found  their  way  into  the  pockets  of  government  and  military  elites,  either  through  fraudulent  contracts,  kickbacks,  or  outright  looting.    Coupled  with  ineffective  financial  management  systems,  corruption  caused  development  to  suffer  heavily.130    Simultaneously,  conflict  on  religious,  ethnic  or  communal  grounds  had  become  omnipresent,  and  would  only  worsen  as  the  years  unfolded.131      The  Post-­‐War  Slide  to  Predatory  Rule     The  exponential  growth  in  the  Nigerian  oil  economy  during  the  1970s  was  overseen  by  two  military  regimes.    Gowan’s  rule,  despite  constant  accusations  of  widespread  corruption  and  mismanagement,  would  survive  until  30  July  1975  when,  on  the  pretext  of  ‘corrective’  rule,  he  was  disposed  in  a  bloodless  coup,  bringing  General  Murtala  Mohammed  to  power.    Although  Mohammed  was  assassinated  during  an  abortive  coup  attempt  in  February  1976,  and  replaced  by  his  second  in  command,  Lieutenant  General  Olusegun  Obasanjo,  the  Mohammed/Obasanjo  regime  is  generally  considered  together,  owing  to                                                                                                                  129  The  Okigbo  Commission  report  of  1980  advised  that  only  one  percent  should  be  allotted  for  environmental  protection,  and  two  percent  for  ‘special  problems’  in  exploitation  areas.    Augustine  A.  Ikein,  The  Impact  of  Oil  on  a  Developing  Country:  The  Case  of  Nigeria,  New  York,  Praeger,  1990,  pp.  27-­‐29.  130  Obe,  ‘The  Challenging  Case  of  Nigeria’,  p.  145.  131  Falola,  Colonialism  and  Violence,  p.  184.     46  
    • continuity  in  stated  policies  and  aims,  including  the  eradication  of  corruption  and  the  return  to  civilian  rule.         In  order  to  achieve  the  former,  Mohammed  carried  out  purges  of  the  military,  the  police  force,  the  judiciary,  and  the  civil  service,  replacing  those  deposed  with  individuals  having  no  links  to  the  previous  regime.    Yet  this  action  had  little  effect  on  already  endemic  political  corruption,  primarily  because  a  lack  of  systematic  reform  of  weak  state  structures  meant  they  could  continue  to  be  manipulated.132    Moreover,  the  credibility  of  the  regime  was  undermined  by  measures  such  as  the  1976  decree  banning  accusations  of  corruption  or  mismanagement  against  sitting  government  officials.133    In  fact,  much  like  Gowan,  Mohammed  and  Obasanjo  presided  over  burgeoning  corruption,  gross  mismanagement  of  public  funds,  and  the  solidification  of  a  kleptocracy  in  Nigeria.134         General  Obasanjo  did,  however,  keep  his  promise  to  hand  over  power  to  a  civilian  government.    Following  the  formulation  of  a  new  constitution,  and  parliamentary  elections  in  1978  that  brought  the  National  Party  of  Nigeria  (NPN)  to  power,  the  country  was  returned  to  democratic  control,  albeit  briefly,  under  the  Second  Republic.135    The  constitution  introduced  several  levers  to  engineer  political  inclusion  and  stability  in  response  to  the  failures  of  the  First  Republic.    It  attempted  to  nullify  conflict  by  creating  more  states,  and  required  that,  in  order                                                                                                                  132  Falola  and  Heaton,  A  History  of  Nigeria,  pp.  188-­‐189  133  Ibid,  p.  196.  134  Ibid,  p.  181.  135  Ibid,  p.  198-­‐199     47  
    • to  win  elections,  support  amongst  voters  external  to  a  candidate’s  own  state  had  to  be  garnered.    Unfortunately,  this  approach  met  with  little  success  having  merely  favoured  those  individuals  whose  ethnic  groups  crossed  several  state  lines.136    The  NPN  proved  to  be  every  bit  as  corrupt  as  its  military  precursors,  using  the  distribution  of  oil  rents  throughout  countrywide  patron-­‐client  networks  to  ensure  continued  political  support.137         Such  was  the  extent  of  corruption  that  the  populace  itself  began  to  call  for  military  intervention.    This  duly  occurred  in  November  1983,  on  the  back  of  an  NPN  election  victory  in  October,  when  in  yet  another  coup  Major  General  Muhammadu  Buhari  took  control  of  the  state.    Again  the  pretext  was  ‘corrective’  rule  but,  although  Buhari  aggressively  prosecuted  corrupt  members  of  the  Second  Republic,  he  failed  to  bring  the  economy  under  control  and  was  removed  from  power  in  1985  by  a  military  coup  staged  by  Major  General  Ibrahim  Badamais  Babangida.    Unwilling  to  accept  a  democratic  transition,  and  amidst  near  total  political  chaos,  Babangida  was  himself  supplanted  in  a  November  1993  coup  by  General  Sani  Abacha,  considered  by  many  to  be  the  most  oppressive  ruler  in  Nigeria’s  history.138    Each  of  these  regimes  oversaw  both  the  further  entrenchment  of  corruption,  and  the  drastic  decline  of  the  Nigerian  economy,  while  maintaining  their  rule  through  brutal  repression.139                                                                                                                  136  John  Boye  Ejobowah,  ‘Constitutionalism  and  Political  Inclusion  in  Nigeria’,  in  Okon  Akiba  (ed.),  Constitutionalism  and  Society  in  Africa,  Aldershot,  Ashgate,  2004,  pp.  103-­‐105.  137  Falola  and  Heaton,  A  History  of  Nigeria,  pp.  198-­‐202.  138  Babangida  had  promised  to  hold  presidential  elections  as  part  of  the  creation  of  a  Third  Republic,  initially  in  1990,  but  this  was  held  back  until  12  June  1993.    Babangida  would,  however,  annul  the  results  of  the  election,  throwing  the  country  into  chaos,  paving  the  way  for  his  removal.    Ibid,  pp.  216-­‐229.  139  Ibid,  pp.  209.     48  
    •   By  the  time  of  Abacha’s  take-­‐over  economic  malaise  had  already  become  a  reality.    The  imposition  of  the  Structural  Adjustment  Program  in  1986  at  the  behest  of  the  IMF,  while  temporarily  deferring  debt  repayments,  led  to  drastic  reductions  in  government  expenditure.140    In  combination  with  an  already  severe  economic  recession,  falling  state  expenditures  curtailed  the  traditional  avenues  of  patronage  with  government  contracts,  subsidies,  and  employment  being  almost  wiped  out.    Nevertheless,  so  entrenched  were  corrupt  practices  within  state  activity  that  graft  skyrocketed,  even  as  the  economy  deteriorated  rapidly.141         During  the  Babangida  and  Abacha  regimes,  the  latter  especially,  substantial  moves  towards  predatory  and  despotic  rule  were  made,  while  a  reconfiguration  of  ethnically  based  patron-­‐client  relations  towards  less  diffuse  forms  heralded  the  onset  of  the  personalized  control  of  systematic  corruption.    Consequently,  the  head  of  state  sat  at  the  top  of  a  corruption  pyramid,  wielding  absolute  power  over  his  patrons  below.    The  concentration  of  power  in  the  executive,  along  with  the  expanded  repressive  capacity  of  the  security  forces,  also  allowed  for  the  relentless  persecution  of  civil  society  and  human  rights  groups.142    By  the  later  years  of  the  Abacha  regime,  extra-­‐judicial  murder  was  rife,  as  was  the  execution  of  political  prisoners.143                                                                                                                      140  Ibid,  p.  219.    Debt  interest  payments  had  at  reached  37.5  percent  of  revenue  by  the  end  of  the  Buhari  regime,  crippling  the  state  treasury.    Ibid,  p.  215.  141  Peter  Lewis,  ‘From  Prebendalism  to  Predation:  The  Political  Economy  of  Decline  in  Nigeria’,  Journal  of  Modern  African  Studies,  Vol.  34,  No.  1,  1996,  p.  97.  142  Lewis,  ‘From  Prebendalism  to  Predation’,  pp.  99-­‐101  143  Kalu,  State  Power,  Autarchy,  and  Political  Conquest,  p.  102.     49  
    • Another  consequence  of  the  period  following  the  collapse  of  the  Second  Republic  was  the  further  entrenchment  of  a  politicized  economy.    Politics  had  become  the  quickest  way  in  which  to  accumulate  wealth,  with  those  closest  to  the  centre  being  the  main  beneficiaries,  thereby  increasing  competition  for  state  access.144    With  state  processes  orientated  towards  accumulation,  followed  by  distribution,  rather  than  taxation  and  expenditure,  the  state  was  less  inclined  to  be  involved  in  the  provision  of  the  public  good.145    Indeed,  the  head  of  Nigeria’s  Economic  and  Financial  Crimes  Commission  (EFCC)  estimated  in  2006  that  since  independence,  US$380  billion  in  oil  revenues  had  been  either  stolen  or  wasted.146    During  the  Babangida  and  Abacha  regimes  alone  almost  US$12  billion  in  oil  revenues  was  siphoned  off  the  federal  budget  and  into  off-­‐budget  accounts.147    Inevitably,  by  the  time  of  the  democratic  transfer  in  1999,  Nigeria  found  itself  with  extraordinary  levels  of  crippling  debt,  with  the  United  Kingdom’s  Department  of  International  Development  estimating  that  US$28.4  billion  was  owed  externally  by  2001.148    At  the  same  time,  despite  abundant  natural  resources,  the  majority  of  Nigeria’s  people  were  living  in  poverty  having  received  little  in  the  way  of  benefit  from  that  blessing.149                                                                                                                    144  A.  G.  Adebayo  and  Toyin  Falola,  ‘Politicians  and  the  Economy’,  in  Segun  Gbadegesin  (ed.)  The  Politicization  of  Society  during  Nigerias  Second  Republic,  1979-­‐83,  Lewiston,  Edwin  Mellen  Press,  1991,  pp.  13-­‐24.  145  Jibrin  Ibrahim,  ‘Obstacles  to  Democratization  in  Nigeria’,  in  Paul  A.  Beckett  and  Crawford  Young  (eds.),  Dilemmas  of  Democracy  in  Nigeria,  Rochester,  University  of  Rochester  Press,  1997,  pp.  156-­‐158.  146  Larry  Diamond,  The  Spirit  of  Democracy:  The  Struggle  to  Build  Free  Societies  Throughout  the  World,  New  York,  Times  Books,  2008,  p.  248.  147  Lewis,  ‘From  Prebendalism  to  Predation’,  p.  101.  148  Mansur  Muhtar  et  al.,  ‘Introduction’,  in  Mansur  Muhtar  et  al.  (eds.),  The  Debt  Trap  in  Nigeria:  Towards  a  Sustainable  Debt  Strategy,  Trenton,  Africa  World  Press,  2002,  pp.  28-­‐32.  149  Obe,  ‘The  Challenging  Case  of  Nigeria’,  154-­‐155.     50  
    • The  Slow  Growth  of  Civil  Society  and  its  Co-­‐option  in  the  Niger  Delta     The  period  following  the  collapse  of  the  Second  Republic  can  also  be  characterized  by  the  slow  growth  of  civil  society  organizations  in  Nigeria.    These  bodies  grew  primarily  in  opposition  to  the  maladministration  of  the  state,  and  were  thus  a  crucial  reason  for  the  increasing  repression  of  society  by  successive  military  regimes.150    The  most  well  known  of  these  civil  society  organizations,  the  Movement  for  the  Survival  of  the  Ogoni  People  (MOSOP),  gained  international  recognition  as  a  symbol  of  opposition  to  the  oppressiveness  of  the  Nigerian  state.    Its  leader,  activist  and  author  Ken  Saro-­‐Wira,  was  executed  in  1995,  along  with  eight  other  MOSOP  officials.    They  were  convicted  for  inciting  the  murders  of  four  Ogoni  chiefs  who  had  sided  with  the  government  during  the  struggle  for  minority  rights  in  the  Niger  Delta.151         Saro-­‐Wira  had  campaigned  against  corruption  and  the  destruction  of  the  Niger  Delta  environment  as  a  result  of  oil  exploitation.    He  claimed  that  Shell  had  ‘successfully  waged  an  ecological  war  against  the  Ogoni  people  since  1958’  with  the  explicit  support  of  the  Nigerian  security  agencies.152  In  fact,  by  the  time  of  his  execution,  the  military  and  police  forces  had  killed  over  2000  people  and  razed  numerous  villages,  while  the  Ogoni  land  had  been  scarred  by  the  effects  of  oil                                                                                                                  150  Civil  society  organizations  such  as  labour  unions,  student  groups,  and  religious  bodies  had  existed  prior  to  the  1980s.    But  following  the  moves  towards  predatory  rule,  new  bodies  began  to  mobilize  who  were  more  involved  in  subverting  the  will  of  the  military  state.    See  Falola  and  Heaton,  A  History  of  Nigeria,  p.  210.  151  Several  witnesses  would  later  claim  to  have  been  bribed  either  by  the  government  or  Shell  to  provide  incriminating  testimonies.    Charles  Lock,  ‘Ken  Saro-­‐Wiwa,  of  "The  Pacification  of  the  Primitive  Tribes  of  the  Lower  Niger"’,  in  Craig  W.  McLuckie  and  Aubrey  McPhail  (eds.),  Ken  Saro-­‐Wira:  Writer  and  Political  Activist,  Boulder,  Lynne  Rienner  Publishers,  2000,  pp.  4-­‐5.      152  Ibid,  p.  6.     51  
    • spills,  poisoned  water  supplies,  and  natural  gas  flaring.153    As  Human  Rights  Watch  argued,  the  government  and  multinationals  had  ‘ravaged  their  land  and  contaminated  their  rivers,  while  providing  little,  if  any,  tangible  benefit  in  return’.154     Although  MOSOP  would  dissolve  after  Saro-­‐Wira’s  execution,  many  other  organizations  emerged  in  its  wake.    Despite  experiencing  negative  publicity  over  MOSOP,  the  Abacha  regime  brutally  repressed  them,  leading  to  the  growth  of  radicalized  militia-­‐type  insurgencies  across  the  Niger  Delta,  who  directed  violence  against  both  the  government  and  the  companies  operating  there.155    While  the  return  to  democracy  in  1999  momentarily  quelled  this  conflict,  the  perceived  continuity  in  government  policy  in  the  following  years  reignited,  and  indeed  worsened  the  violence.    Even  increases  in  oil  revenue  shares  for  producing  regions,  from  three  to  thirteen  per  cent,  failed  to  diminish  militant,  and  increasingly  criminal,  activity,  partly  because  the  extra  funds  merely  served  to  line  the  pockets  of  local  government  officials.    These  funds  were  then  channelled  back  into  the  recruitment  of  Niger  Delta  militia  groups,  whose  leaders  were  often  former  civil  society  activists,  for  their  use  in  intimidation                                                                                                                  153  Rob  Nixon,  ‘Pipe  Dreams:  Ken  Saro-­‐Wiwa,  Environmental  Justice,  and  Microminority  Rights’,  in  Craig  W.  McLuckie  and  Aubrey  McPhail  (eds.),  Ken  Saro  Wira:  Writer  and  Political  Activist,  Boulder,  Lynne  Rienner  Publishers,  2000,  p.  111.  154  Quoted  in  Joseph  Mclaren,  ‘A  Political  Assessment:  Genocide  in  Nigeria:  The  Ogoni  Tragedy’,  in  Craig  W.  McLuckie  Aubrey  McPhail  (eds.),  Ken  Saro-­‐Wira:  Writer  and  Political  Activist,  Boulder,  Lynne  Rienner  Publishers,  2000,  p.  18.  155  In  a  study  of  civil  society  radicalization  between  1960  and  2002  amongst  southern  Nigerian  ethnic  associations,  Adekson  found  that  the  policies  of  the  state  had  led  to  the  overt  radicalization  of  such  organisations,  particularly  after  1994.    Adedayo  Oluwakayode  Adekson,  The  "Civil  society"  Problematique:  Deconstructing  Civility  and  Southern  Nigerias  Ethnic  Radicalization,  New  York,  Routledge,  2003,  pp.  19-­‐20.     52  
    • tactics  during  subsequent  election  years.156    Indeed,  the  fraternization  of  civil  society  groups  across  Nigeria  with  the  apparatuses  of  the  state  has,  more  often  than  not,  led  to  their  corruption.157    Obasanjo  and  the  Democratic  Turn     Following  the  death  of  Abacha  on  8  June  1998,  moves  were  made  under  the  transitional  government  of  General  Abdulsalami  Bubakar  towards  a  democratic  transfer.    Elections  held  for  the  state  assemblies  and  governorships  on  9  January  1999  and  for  the  Presidency  on  27  February  brought  the  People’s  Democratic  Party  (PDP),  and  their  candidate  and  former  military  dictator,  General  Obasanjo  to  power.    Though  allegations  of  vote  rigging  and  intimidation  were  widespread,  the  long  period  of  military  rule  was  finally  put  to  an  end  with  the  swearing  in  of  the  Fourth  Republic  on  29  May  1999.158     During  his  inauguration  speech  Obasanjo  specifically  called  for  an  end  to  corruption,  the  ‘greatest  single  bane  of  our  society  today’.    Significant  reforms  were  undertaken  in  the  years  following  the  democratic  transfer,  including  the  granting  of  autonomy  to  the  legislative  and  judicial  branches,  increases  in  press  freedom,  and  moves  towards  transparent  governance.    Bodies  directed  towards  the  eradication  of  corruption  were  established  or  strengthened.    They  included  the  Code  of  Conduct  Bureau  (CCB),  and  the  Code  of  Conduct  Tribunal  (CCT),                                                                                                                  156  Darren  Kew  and  Cyril  Obi,  ‘Nigeria:  Dilemmas  of  Militarization  and  Co-­‐optation  in  the  Niger  Delta’,  in  Thania  Paffenholz  (ed.),  Civil  Society  &  Peacebuilding:  A  Critical  Assessment,  Boulder,  Lynne  Rienner  Publishers,  2010,  pp.  356-­‐358.    157  Falola  and  Heaton,  A  History  of  Nigeria,  p.  212.  158  Ibid,  pp.  234-­‐235.     53  
    • which  had  been  established  under  the  1979  constitution  in  order  to  enforce  the  declaration  of  assets  and  conflicts  of  interest,  but  had  hitherto  been  ineffectual.    Obasanjo  also  created  the  Independent  Corrupt  Practices  and  Other  Related  Offences  Commission  (ICPC)  to  investigate  public  complaints  and  educate  the  public,  and  the  EFCC  to  investigate  economic  and  financial  crimes.159    These  bodies  have  laid  several  high  level  charges  since  1999,  though  most  have  not  led  to  lengthy  jail  terms  or  significant  asset  seizures.160         The  Obasanjo  government  also  made  moves  towards  entering  the  EITI  framework.    Obasanjo  committed  Nigeria  to  the  framework  in  November  2003,  and  launched  the  NEITI  in  February  2004.    The  first  validation  report  was  released  in  2006  (encompassing  the  period  1999-­‐2004),  and  uncovered  significant  discrepancies  in  the  reporting  of  both  government  and  multinational  company  revenues.    The  second  validation  report  (encompassing  2005),  not  released  until  October  2008,  uncovered  similar  discrepancies.161    Despite  such  disparities,  Nigeria  was  accepted  as  a  candidate  country  on  27  September  2007,  having  passed  the  NEITI  Act  in  May,  which  made  it  an  offence  to  give  false                                                                                                                  159  Rotimi  T.  Suberu,  ‘The  Travails  of  Nigerias  Anti-­‐Corruption  Crusade’,  in  Robert  I.  Rotberg  (ed.)  Corruption,  Global  Security,  and  World  Order,  Washington,  Brookings  Institution  Press,  2009,  pp.  262-­‐264.  160  There  have  been  several  large-­‐scale  charges  laid  since  1999.    For  example,  federal  cabinet  ministers  Sunday  Afolabi,  Mohammed  Shata,  and  Hussaini  Akwanga,  have  all  been  charged  for  misappropriation,  and  in  2008  Minister  for  Health  Adenike  Grange  and  other  officials  were  charged  with  siphoning  off  more  than  one  million  dollars  through  fake  contracts.    The  most  spectacular  charges,  however,  were  against  state  governors,  who  under  the  new  system  received  24  percent  from  the  federation  account.    Between  1999  and  2007  31  governors  of  the  36  states  were  indicted.    Unfortunately,  more  often  that  not,  charges  did  not  lead  to  sentences.    Ibid,  pp.  265-­‐269  161  For  instance,  the  second  validation  report  included  discrepancies  amounting  to  $US800  million  in  missing  funds.    Extractive  Industries  Transparency  Initiative,  Nigeria,  retrieved  16  March  2011,  available  from  <http://eiti.org/Nigeria>.     54  
    • information  or  false  statements  of  accounts  within  that  framework.162    Following  the  release  of  the  2011  validation  report,  covering  2006-­‐2008,  and  showing  unreconciled  payments  of  US$917.1  million,163  Nigeria  was  accepted  as  a  compliant  country  on  2  March  2011,  indicating  its  full  acceptance  into  the  EITI  framework.164     Despite  the  significance  of  these  moves  towards  the  reform  of  the  heavily  corrupted  Nigerian  system,  their  success  has  been  somewhat  muted.    Arguably  the  reform  initiatives  have  been  inconsistent  at  best,  and  often  contradictory  at  worst,  despite  the  enthusiastic  response  of  donor  countries.    For  example,  in  the  lead  up  to  the  farcical  2007  elections,  Obasanjo  was  seen  to  be  using  the  organs  of  the  anti-­‐corruption  campaign  for  his  own  political  ends  in  order  to  remove  obstacles  to  his  preferred  candidate  Alhaji  Yar’Adua.165    Moreover,  institutions  such  as  the  ICPC  and  EFCC  have  been  starved  of  resources  and  their  efforts  have  not  been  complemented  by  wider  reform.166        Within  the  EITI  framework  auditors  have  been  given  only  restricted  access  to  NNPC  finances,  obvious  shortcomings  in  the  NEITI  reports  have  not  been  addressed,  and  the  audits  themselves  have  been  significantly  delayed  and  underfunded.167    Obasanjo  himself  was  linked  to  land  grabs,  extortion,  failure  to  declare  assets,  and  the  deliberate  alienation  of  civil  society  groups,  trends  which  changed  little  under                                                                                                                  162  Ibid.  163  Nigeria  Extractive  Industries  Transparency  Initiative,  2006-­‐2008  EITI  Reconciliation:  Final  Report,  3  February  2011,  p.  17,  retrieved  16  March  2011,  available  from  <http://www.neiti.org.ng/2006-­‐2008ReconciliationReport.html>.  164  Extractive  Industries  Transparency  Initiative,  Press  Release,  p.  1.  165  Alexandra  Gillies,  ‘Obasanjo,  the  Donor  Community  and  Reform  Implementation  in  Nigeria’,  Round  Table,  Vol.  96,  No.  392,  2007,  pp.  575-­‐577.  166  Suberu,  ‘The  Travails  of  Nigeria’s  Anti-­‐Corruption  Crusade’,  pp.  275-­‐277.  167  Gillies,  ‘Obasanjo’,  pp.  580-­‐581.     55  
    • his  protégé  Yar’Adua.168    At  the  same  time,  more  than  two-­‐thirds  of  the  population  still  lives  in  poverty.169         With  the  military  in  control  for  29  or  the  51  years  since  independence,  it  is  hardly  surprising  that  transparency  is  not  ingrained  within  the  political  system.    No  doubt  transparency  will  take  many  years  to  achieve.    Yet  the  continuing  involvement  of  the  military,  and  specifically  former  dictators  in  Obasanjo  and  Yar’Adua,  his  deputy  head  of  state  from  1976-­‐1979,  does  not  bode  well  for  change.170    During  the  2003  and  the  2007  elections,  intimidation,  vote  rigging,  and  widespread  calls  for  annulment  only  intensified,171  while  Nigeria  remained  firmly  fixed  at  the  bottom  of  TI’s  Corruption  Perception  Index  (CPI)  ratings.172    A  New  Beginning?     In  April  2011  Nigeria  held  what  has  widely  been  hailed  as  the  most  free  and  fair  elections  in  its  history.    Goodluck  Jonathan,  who  replaced  Yar’Adua                                                                                                                  168  Suberu,  ‘The  Travails  of  Nigeria’s  Anti-­‐Corruption  Crusade’,  pp.  270-­‐275.    For  example,  Obasanjo  did  not  declare  his  assets  in  1999  under  Section  140  (I)  of  the  constitution.    When  this  was  pointed  out  by  the  Human  Rights  Law  Service  to  the  CCB,  it  advised  that  he  had  made  the  declaration  in  private  and  was  not  required  to  make  a  public  declaration.    Obe,  ‘The  Challenging  Case  of  Nigeria’,  p.  166.    Yar’Adua,  for  his  part,  allowed  the  removal  of  the  highly  respected  Mallam  Nuhu  Ribadu,  head  of  the  EFCC  under  trumped  up  corruption  charges  widely  believed  to  have  been  politically  motivated  following  his  pursuit  of  government  supporters.    Global  Integrity,  Global  Integrity  Scorecard:  Nigeria  2008,  Washington,  Global  Integrity,  2008,  pp.  1-­‐2,  retrieved  8  March  2011,  available  from  <http://report.globalintegrity.org/Nigeria/2008>.  169  Helen  M.  McFerson,  ‘Governance  and  Hyper-­‐Corruption’,  p.  1541.  170  Obe,  ‘The  Challenging  Case  of  Nigeria’,  p.  147.  171  Kalu,  State  Power,  Autarchy,  and  Political  Conquest,  pp.  163-­‐165.  172  Nigeria  was  second  last  on  the  TI  CPI  ratings  in  2003,  with  a  similar  rating  in  2004,  and  a  slight  raise  to  sixth  last  in  2006.    Obe,  ‘The  Challenging  Case  of  Nigeria’,  p.  149.     56  
    • following  his  death  in  office  in  May  2010,  was  elected  to  his  first  full  term  over  the  former  military  dictator  Buhari,  winning  by  23  to  12  million  votes.    As  opposed  to  the  series  of  elections  since  1999,  this  vote  has  been  given  a  pass  mark  by  foreign  observers,  with  minimal  violence  and  vote  rigging  being  reported  during  the  process.173    The  election  was  far  from  perfect,  however,  and  rigging  claims  by  Buhari’s  supporters  have  been  prevalent  in  the  post-­‐election  period.    Yet  high  hopes  are  held  for  Nigeria  with  many  believing  it  has  turned  a  corner  on  its  past.174         The  reality  is  that  change  will  be  a  slow  exercise.    Despite  what  appeared  to  be  an  orderly  process,  violence  was  brewing  just  below  the  surface.    In  post-­‐election  violence  in  the  country’s  Muslim  North,  500  people  (mostly  Christians)  were  recorded  killed,  with  widespread  rioting  accompanying  the  violence.175    Moreover,  immediately  following  Jonathan’s  inauguration,  bomb  blasts  occurred  in  the  country’s  north.176    What  this  underlines  is  that  deep  divisions  still  exist  across  the  country,  and  will  be  a  significant  challenge  for  Jonathan  to  overcome.177                                                                                                                    173  Joe  Brock,  ‘Nigerian  Election  Victory  for  Goodluck  Jonathan  Sparks  Riots’,  Guardian,  19  April  2011,  p.  16.  174  David  Smith,  ‘Goodluck  Jonathan  Elected  President  as  Nigeria  Takes  a  Hopeful  Step’,  Guardian,  19  April  2011,  retrieved  27  April  2011,  available  from  <http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/apr/19/goodluck-­‐jonathan-­‐president-­‐unrest-­‐nigeria>.  175  Reuters,  ‘Hundreds  Killed  in  Nigerian  Post-­‐Election  Violence’,  Guardian,  25  April  2011,  p.  22.  176  Reuters,  ‘Bomb  Blast  at  Nigerian  Army  Barracks’,  ibid,  30  May  2011,  retrieved  4  June  2011,  available  from  <http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011  /may/30/bomb-­‐blast-­‐nigerian-­‐army-­‐barracks?INTCMP=SRCH>.  177  John  Campbell,  ‘Nigeria:  The  Morning  After’,  International  Herald  Tribune,  3  May  2011,  retrieved  4  June  2011,  available  from  <http://www.nytimes.com/2011/05/03/  opinion/03iht-­‐edcampbell03.html>.     57  
    • Conclusions       Clearly,  oil  entered  into  an  arena  where  ethnic  and  religious  divisions,  corruption,  and  violent  competition  for  control  of  the  state  were  already  entrenched  within  the  socio-­‐political  system.    Oil  certainly  exacerbated  these  existing  problems,  but  it  did  not  create  them.    Rather,  these  social  and  political  factors,  specific  to  the  Nigerian  historical  context,  are  the  underlying  causes  of  the  resource  curse  as  manifested  in  that  country.         58  
    •  Chapter  4:  Social  and  Political  Causes     Natural  resource  abundance  compounded  an  already  deteriorating  political  and  social  context  in  Nigeria.    What  would  normally  be  regarded  as  a  blessing  would  be  whittled  away  through  graft  for  personal  or  communal  ends.    In  this  chapter  the  social  and  political  causes  of  the  resource  curse  in  Nigeria,  as  identified  in  the  historical  overview,  will  be  explored  in  greater  detail  in  order  to  clarify  their  causal  role.        Ethnic  Division  and  the  State     The  creation  of  an  amalgamated  Nigerian  state  by  the  British  colonial  administration  in  1914  would,  at  least  outwardly,  seem  to  signify  the  possibility  of  a  unified,  or  unifiable,  national  consciousness.    State  formation  in  Nigeria  has,  however,  been  plagued  by  the  reality  of  entrenched  ethnic  and  religious  divisions,  which  have  precluded  the  fostering  of  a  pan-­‐Nigerian  identity.      Local  and  regional  communities  have  remained  the  focal  point  of  identity  formulation,  and  persistent  and  often  violent  struggle  for  the  centre  has  marred  the  shaping  of  a  viable  post-­‐colonial  state.178    Oil,  and  the  vast  rent  yield  that  accompanies  its  exploitation,  became  the  context  in  which  this  conflict  has  taken                                                                                                                  178  Falola  and  Heaton,  The  History  of  Nigeria,  pp.  158-­‐159     59  
    • place,  but  its  roots  go  far  deeper  than  the  ‘devil’s  excrement’  itself.179    Indeed,  the  failure  of  successive  regimes,  military  or  otherwise,  to  solve  the  ‘national  question’  lies  at  the  root  of  Nigeria’s  inherent  political  and  social  instability,  which  in  turn  explains  the  inability  to  turn  resource  abundance  into  developmental  windfall.180       Ethnic  division  is  so  embedded  within  the  Nigerian  polity  that  its  particular  manifestation  is  generally,  and  negatively,  referred  to  as  ‘tribalism’.    More  than  mere  ethnic  nationalism,  itself  not  necessarily  inherently  damaging,  tribalism  refers  to  a  ‘morbid  loyalty  and  commitment  to  one’s  ethnic  group  to  the  exclusion,  prejudice  and  often  at  the  expense  of  other  groups’.181    Despite  the  use  of  a  rather  anachronistic  sounding  term,  the  phenomenon  it  describes  owes  more  to  alienating  colonial  policies  and  perverse  manipulation  by  Nigerian  elites  than  to  pre-­‐colonial  ethnic  formations  and  relationships.    Despite  differing  traditions,  languages,  and  forms  of  political  organization,  West  African  ethnic  groups  had  often  interacted  peacefully  in  areas  of  common  interest  such  as  trade,  idea  transference,  and  religious  practice,  prior  to  colonization.182    Yet  they  had  not  experienced  broader  political  unification,  a  fact  that  ensured  amalgamation  would  be  ‘inorganic,  alien,  and  transformative’.183         During  the  colonial  period  the  British  deliberately  used  divisive  policies  to  control  the  population  thereby  exacerbating  differences  either  perceived  or                                                                                                                  179  Juan  Pablo  Pérez  Alfonso,  Venezuelan  oil  minister  in  the  1960s  and  one  of  the  founders  of  OPEC,  quoted  in  McFerson,  ‘Extractive  Industries’,  p.  337.  180  Falola  and  Heaton,  A  History  of  Nigeria,  p.  159.  181  Afolayan,  ‘Nigeria’,  p.  51.  182  Ibid,  p.  46.  183  Falola  and  Heaton,  A  History  of  Nigeria,  p.  109.     60  
    • actual.184      As  many  retreated  towards  traditional  solidarity  groups  in  an  attempt  to  evade  the  pernicious  effects  of  colonial  rule,  the  foundations  of  the  post-­‐colonial  state  were  significantly  weakened.185    Thereafter,  persistent  manipulation  of  ethnic  loyalties  by  the  new  Nigerian  political  elites  for  their  own  personal  or  communal  ends  has  instilled  fear,  hatred  and  aggression  within  the  Nigerian  political  and  social  system,  as  witnessed  in  the  aftermath  of  even  the  comparatively  calm  2011  elections.186         The  insular  nature  of  Nigerian  tribalism  has  served  to  reinforce  the  country’s  prevailing  form  of  official  corruption  known  as  ‘prebendalism’.    Developed  by  Richard  Joseph,  this  term  describes  the  manipulation  of  traditional  patron-­‐client  networks  in  Nigeria  to  serve  modern  corruption  networks  at  the  expense  of  state  coffers.    As  in  the  notion  of  the  ‘prebend’  –  an  office  of  a  feudal  state,  acquired  either  through  service  or  purchase,  and  subsequently  used  for  accumulation  by  the  holder  –  these  networks  have  been  used  throughout  the  post-­‐colonial  era  in  the  acquisition  of  state  offices,  whose  holders  subsequently  divert  public  funds  back  to  client  groups  as  recompense.187    With  the  inclusion  of  enormous  oil  rents  into  this  dynamic,  political  activity  deteriorated  into  an  ‘unremitting  and  unconstrained  struggle  for  possession  and  access  to  state  offices,  with  the  chief  aim  of  procuring  direct  material  benefits  to  oneself,  and                                                                                                                  184  Afolayan,  ‘Nigeria’,  p.  47.  185  Claude  Ake,  ‘Political  Ethnicity  and  State-­‐Building  in  Nigeria’,  in  Winston  A.  van  Horne  (ed.),  Global  Convulsions:  Race,  Ethnicity,  and  Nationalism  at  the  End  of  the  Twentieth-­‐Century,  Albany,  State  University  of  New  York  Press,  1997,  p.  300.  186  William  D.  Graf,  The  Nigerian  State:  Political  Economy,  State  Class  and  Political  System  in  the  Post-­‐Colonial  Era,  London,  J.  Currey,  1988,  pp.  19-­‐21.  187  Diamond,  The  Spirit  of  Democracy,  p.  248.     61  
    • one’s  acknowledged  communal  or  other  sectional  groups’.188    In  turn,  Nigeria’s  oil  wealth  would  become  associated  with,  and  appropriated  by,  these  ethnically  delineated  patron-­‐client  networks,  thereby  assigning  a  material  value  to  ethnicity.189         Official  corruption  and  its  direct  links  to  ethnicity  in  Nigeria  would  reach  its  zenith  during  the  1990s,  rather  than  in  the  heady  days  of  the  oil  booms.    In  the  earlier  decades  patron-­‐client  networks  and  the  corruption  emanating  from  them  had  been  largely  decentralized  and  diffuse.    The  Babangida  and  Abacha  military  regimes  moved  towards  more  personalized  forms  of  rule  and  predatory  state  apparatuses,  and  instigated  a  more  rapacious  and  autocratic  control  of  the  state.190    Both  ran  roughshod  over  already  debilitated  public  institutions  and  embryonic  civil  society  organizations,  looting  the  state  treasury  almost  at  will,  and  all  while  standing  at  the  apex  of  hegemonic  and  ethnically  framed  patron-­‐client  networks.191    Personalized  control  of  this  nature  served  to  preclude  the  emergence  of  an  ‘impersonal  state’,  based  upon  the  rule  of  law.    As  Max  Weber  argued,  this  leads  to  a  state  lacking  in  the  ‘bureaucratic  separation  of  the  “private”  and  the  “official”  sphere’.192    The  transition  to  democracy,  and  the  continued  manipulation  of  this  system  by  the  Obasanjo  administration,  has  done  little  to  break  this  trend  towards  ethnically  based  control.    On  the  other  hand,  the  failure                                                                                                                  188  Quoted  in  Apter,  The  Pan-­‐African  Nation,  p.  30.  189  Ibid,  pp.  30-­‐31  190  Lewis,  ‘From  Prebendalism  to  Predation’,  pp.  99-­‐101.  191  Peter  Lewis,  ‘Nigeria:  An  End  to  the  Permanent  Transition?’,  Journal  of  Democracy,  Vol.  10,  No.  1,  1999,  pp.  144-­‐148.  192  Quoted  in  Ibrahim,  ‘Obstacles  to  Democratization’,  p.  156.     62  
    • to  address  underlying  ethnic  tension  has  led  to  an  explosion  of  resentment,  and  ultimately  violence,  particularly  in  the  Niger  Delta  oil  region.193    Endemic  and  Systematic  Corruption     Following  independence,  corruption  became  the  primary  means  through  which  elites  accumulated  wealth.    This  fact  served  to  shape  both  political  activity  and  the  nature  of  the  state  itself,  as  well  as  fuelling  aggressive  competition  for  state  power.    There  can  be  no  doubt  that  the  considerable  volume  of  available  oil  rents  intensified  unscrupulous  behaviour,  however,  it  is  important  to  recognize  it  was  already  pervasive  in  the  years  leading  up  to  the  oil  boom,  and  was  a  significant  factor  in  the  collapse  of  the  First  Republic.194    Indeed,  corruption  was  endemic  during  the  late  colonial  period,  both  in  objective  reality,  and  as  a  matter  of  public  discourse.         The  emerging  political  elites,  who  had  begun  to  take  over  positions  of  power  within  the  bureaucracy,  and  who  continued  to  honour  traditional  patrimonial  relationships,  began  diverting  public  funds  back  to  their  client  bases.    Traditional  forms  of  patron-­‐client  obligation  were  therefore  corrupted  as  they  were  implanted  into  modern  political  systems,  though  the  extent  of  the  problem  had  yet  to  enter  into  public  awareness.    Ostensibly  concerned  about  the  implications  for  self-­‐rule,  the  British  inserted  concerns  over  rampant  corruption                                                                                                                  193  Falola  and  Heaton,  A  History  of  Nigeria,  p.  235.  194  Osoba,  ‘Corruption  in  Nigeria’,  p.  371.     63  
    • in  public  office  into  the  debate  over  the  transference  of  power.195    Corruption  was,  therefore,  thrust  into  the  public  discourse,  becoming  politicized  in  the  process,  and  was  being  increasingly  utilized  in  political  competition  as  a  weapon  against  one’s  foes.196    Despite  the  level  of  awareness  corruption  obtained  during  the  late  colonial  period,  little  definitive  action  was  taken  to  combat  it,  and  independence  would  bring  about  only  a  ‘cosmetic’  change,  paving  the  way  for  the  systematization  of  corruption  within  the  Nigerian  political  edifice.197         Attempts  at  the  eradication  or  negation  of  corruption  have  rarely  risen  above  the  level  of  symbolism  in  Nigeria.    Having  given  corruption  as  the  primary  motive  for  military  intervention  one  would  expect  some  degree  of  systematic  investigation.    Instead,  a  recurring  pattern  emerged  in  which  an  agenda  of  corrective  rule  would  be  framed  amongst  rhetorical  flushes,  followed  by  the  establishment  of  investigative  commissions  whose  final  report  would  be  subsequently  buried  and  forgotten.    Beyond  the  prosecution  of  a  handful  of  corrupt  politicians,  the  majority  of  whom  happened  to  be  political  rivals,  little  real  change  would  be  instigated.198         Such  was  the  case  in  the  aftermath  of  the  original  military  take-­‐over  in  1966  by  the  Gowan  regime,  and  in  the  formation  of  the  1975  Public  Complaints  Commission  following  his  disposal  by  Murtala  Mohammed.    As  a  consequence  of                                                                                                                  195  For  example,  gift  giving  in  the  North  was  viewed  as  dangerous  for  the  modern  polity,  a  pre-­‐colonial  hangover  that  needed  to  be  cleared.    Such  concerns  were  pushed  over  and  above  others  such  as  ethnic  tension  and  general  bureaucratic  incompetence.    Robert  L.  Tignor,  ‘Political  Corruption  in  Nigeria  before  Independence’,  Journal  of  Modern  African  Studies,  Vol.  31,  No.  2,  1993,  pp.  175-­‐176.    196  Ibid,  pp.  175-­‐176.  197  Osoba,  ‘Corruption  in  Nigeria’,  p.  373.  198  Ibid,  pp.  375-­‐36.     64  
    • the  lack  of  enduring  and  systematic  measures  undertaken  prior  to  the  democratic  handover  in  1999,  corruption  has  been  allowed  to  become  embedded  within  the  Nigerian  political  system,  almost  to  the  point  of  public  acceptance.199    Furthermore,  the  contradictions  inherent  in  Obasanjo’s  assault  on  corruption  from  1999  onwards  have  undermined  the  push  for  tangible  change.     Corruption  in  the  Nigerian  context  has  not  been  caused  by  the  introduction  of  significant  oil  abundance  and  corresponding  rents.    Rather,  oil  rents  provided  more  opportunities  for  graft  and  more  fuel  for  violent  competition  for  the  state.    The  underlying  cause  of  corruption  in  this  case  is  the  interplay  and  mismatch  between  traditional  obligation  structures  and  the  formation  of  modern  political  systems.    Once  implanted,  corruption  became  entrenched  within  those  systems,  and  everyday  society.    It  has  instilled  the  belief  that  honesty  does  not  pay,  leading  to  its  acceptance  as  a  reality  at  the  local  level.200    For  ordinary  Nigerians,  corruption  has  become  a  ‘survival  strategy  and  moral  imperative  –  for  to  be  without  a  patron  is  to  have  no  resources’  –  while  at  the  same  time  standing  in  the  way  of  economic  and  social  advancement.201    Competition,  Statism,  and  Violence     The  Nigerian  political  system  exhibits  an  extreme  form  of  statism,  which  in  turn  engenders  violent  competition  for  the  control  of  the  state.    Claude  Ake,                                                                                                                  199  Suberu,  ‘The  Travails  of  Nigeria’s  Anti-­‐Corruption  Crusade’,  p.  263.  200  Osaba,  ‘Corruption  in  Nigeria’,  pp.  384-­‐385  201  Daniel  Jordan  Smith,  ‘The  Paradoxes  of  Popular  Participation  in  Corruption  in  Nigeria’,  in  Robert  I.  Rotberg  (ed.),  Corruption,  Global  Security,  and  World  Order,  Washington,  Brookings  Institution  Press,  2009,  p.  284.     65  
    • addressing  the  May  1981  Conference  of  the  Nigerian  Political  Science  Association,  described  it  thus:     The  Nigerian  state  appears  to  intervene  everywhere  and  to  own  virtually   everything  including  access  to  status  and  wealth.    Inevitably,  a  desperate   struggle  to  win  control  of  state  power  ensues  since  this  control  means  for   all  practical  purposes  being  all  powerful  and  owning  everything.    Politics   becomes  warfare,  a  matter  of  life  and  death.202    Such  a  political  environment  is  not  favourable  to  the  fostering  of  democratic  institutions  and  values,  rather  serving  to  solidify  economic  competition  as  the  mainstay  of  political  activity.    The  introduction  of  extensive  and  valuable  natural  resources  into  this  dynamic  both  extends  competition  for  the  state,  and  provides  those  already  in  power  with  a  tremendous  advantage.203       The  federal  state  structure  established  at  the  time  of  independence  did  little  to  defuse  this  competition.    By  instituting  regionalism,  whilst  giving  no  power  to  the  constituent  units  themselves,  Nigerian  federalism  bred  instability  in  the  form  of  contests  for  control  of  the  centre.204    This  inherent  instability  in  the  political  sphere  is  evidenced  by  the  fact  that  between  1960  and  2000  there  have  only  been  two  instances  of  orderly  power  transitions  –  1979  and  1999.    The  remaining  twelve  transfers  occurred  violently,  arbitrarily,  and  unconstitutionally.205    Moreover,  the  continual  creation  of  additional  states,  with  many  of  them  being  unsustainable,  has  merely  bred  new  opportunities  for                                                                                                                  202  Quoted  in  Suberu,  ‘Institutions,  Political  Culture,  and  Constitutionalism’,  p.  203.  203  Ibid,  p.  203.  204  Rotimi  T.  Suberu,  Federalism  and  Ethnic  Conflict  in  Nigeria,  Washington,  United  States  Institute  of  Peace,  2001,  pp.  16-­‐20.  205  Victor  Oguejiofor  Okafor,  A  Roadmap  for  Understanding  African  Politics:  Leadership  and  Political  Integration  in  Nigeria,  New  York,  Routledge,  2006,  p.  11.     66  
    • conflict  over  borders,  distribution  and  discrimination.206    At  the  same  time,  ethnic  minorities  within  those  states,  ever  fearful  of  majority  domination,  have  tended  to  withdraw  from  the  political  process,  further  undermining  the  system  itself.207     Competition  for  the  control  of  the  state  in  Nigeria  is  compounded  by  a  political  culture  steeped  in  violence.    Threatened  or  actual  violence  had  been  an  integral  element  of  the  imposition  of  colonial  rule,  and  the  subsequent  maintenance  of  domination.    Violence  would  also  mark  the  state  soon  after  independence,  with  the  country  plunged  into  a  bitter  civil  war  within  seven  years.    Thereafter,  the  belief  in  violence  as  a  useful  political  tool,  and  further  that  its  use  was  required  in  the  maintenance  of  power,  became  fossilized  in  the  political  psyche.    Members  of  the  political  class,  whether  of  military  origin  or  otherwise,  have  often  controlled  the  state’s  apparatuses  through  murder  and  intimidation,  behaviours  which  seeped  into  civil  society  itself.    Thus  did  the  agents  of  the  state  become  impediments  to  change,  and  instruments  of  state  directed  terrorism.208    Unfortunately  the  transition  to  democracy  has  thus  far  failed  to  eradicate  violence  from  the  political  process,  with  Human  Rights  Watch  reporting  that  violence  and  corruption  are  so  pervasive  in  Nigeria  that  politics  has  come  to  resemble  criminal  activity.    Indeed,  overt  vote  rigging  and  violent                                                                                                                  206  Eghosa  E.  Osaghae,  ‘Interstate  Relations  in  Nigeria’,  Publius,  Vol.  24,  No.  4,  1994,  pp.  85-­‐86.  207  Falola  and  Heaton,  A  History  of  Nigeria,  p.  159.  208  Falola,  Colonialism  and  Violence  in  Nigeria,  pp.  171-­‐185.     67  
    • intimidation  so  marked  the  elections  of  1999,  2003,  and  2007  that  each  approached  the  level  of  a  farce.209     Military  control  of  the  state  has  been  disastrous  for  Nigeria’s  social  and  political  development.    A  prime  example  of  Harold  Lasswell’s  ‘garrison  state’,  Nigerian  politics  is  based  upon  the  military  model,  as  is  the  structure  of  state-­‐society  relations.    Despite  the  shift  to  democratic  modes  of  governance,  civilian  leaders  have  by  and  large  reverted  to  command  and  control  governing  styles,  not  least  because  they  frequently  had  a  history  of  involvement  in  the  military.    In  the  Obasanjo  government,  for  example,  many  retired  generals  found  their  way  into  the  legislature,  despite  the  forcible  retirement  of  150  officers  who  had  served  in  the  1984  to  1999  period.210    This  continuity  of  military  rule  across  several  decades  has  created  a  militarized  state  and  political  culture,  and  at  the  very  least  contributed  to  the  appearance  of  violence  in  social  interactions.    The  argument  that  the  military  prevents  outbreaks  of  chaos,  repeated  in  the  lead-­‐up  to  every  coup  since  Gowan’s,  is  disingenuous.211                                                                                                                              209  Human  Rights  Watch,  Criminal  Politics:  Violence,  “Godfathers”,  and  Corruption  in  Nigeria,  9  October  2007,  Vol.  16(A),  pp.  1-­‐2,  retrieved  11  January  2011,  available  from  <http://www.hrw.org/en/reports/2007/10/08/criminal-­‐politics-­‐0>.  210  Kalu,  State  Power,  Autarchy,  and  Political  Conquest,  pp.  146-­‐149.  211  Ibrahim,  ‘Obstacles  to  Democratization  in  Nigeria’,  pp.  160-­‐163.     68  
    •  Chapter  5:  Transparency  as  Cure?       The  above  social  and  political  factors  all  served  to  embed  the  resource  curse  deep  within  the  Nigerian  system  once  abundance  arrived.    The  current  global  response  to  the  failures  of  the  Nigerian  state,  which  they  have  engendered,  the  EITI,  seeks  to  alleviate  the  curse  by  emboldening  civil  society  to  hold  governments  to  account.    According  to  TI,  ‘[t]ransparent  resource  governance  is  the  key  to  reversing  a  country’s  resource  curse  into  a  blessing’.    It  will  do  so  by  making  ‘civil  society  better  equipped  to  hold  policy  makers  accountable  for  actions  on  related  development  decisions’,  and  ‘provide  citizens  with  key  evidence  needed  to  pressure  governments’.212    Such  confidence  in  civil  society’s  ability  to  act  as  a  bulwark  against  state  power  seemingly  echoes  Tocqueville’s  observation  that  there  is  an  inverse  relationship  between  a  state’s  ability  to  coerce  and  the  extent  to  which  organized  local  interest  groups  advance  their  interests.213    Indeed,  a  robust  civil  society  is  considered  by  many  to  be  the  ‘missing  ingredient’  of  state  legitimacy  and  viable  state-­‐society  interaction  in  Africa  more  generally.    Civil  society  is  the  point  at  which  the  citizenry  at  large  is  involved  in  rule  making,  and  agreed  rules  are  essential  to  a  functioning  society,                                                                                                                  212  Transparency  International,  Enhancing  Revenue  Transparency  in  Oil  and  Gas  Company  Reporting,  Transparency  International  Policy  Position  05/2008,  Berlin,  Transparency  International,  2008,  pp.  1-­‐2,  retrieved  16  March  2011,  available  from  <http://www.transparency.org/publications/publications/policy_positions/pp5_enhancing_revenue_transparency>.  213  Joel  D.  Barkan,  ‘Resurrecting  Modernization  Theory  and  the  Emergence  of  Civil  Society  in  Kenya  and  Nigeria’,  in  David  E.  Apter  and  Carl  R.  Rosberg  (eds.),  Political  Development  and  the  New  Realism  in  Sub-­‐Saharan  Africa,  Charlottesville,  University  Press  of  Virginia,  1994,  p.  91.     69  
    • and  to  the  interaction  between  state  and  society.    Its  emergence  is  therefore  considered  essential  to  the  ‘prevention  of  political  decay  that  undermined  new  African  governments  a  generation  ago’.214     Yet  civil  society,  and  a  working  relationship  between  state  and  society  more  generally,  are  severely  lacking  in  Nigeria.    The  absence  of  a  unifying  political  culture  and  deep  divisions  within  society  itself  has  undermined  the  growth  of  viable  civil  society  organizations,  even  in  the  democratic  era.    So,  too,  has  the  often-­‐violent  repression  of  embryonic  bodies  by  predatory  state  apparatuses.215    The  political  weakness  of  those  organizations  supposedly  keeping  the  government  accountable  is  clear  from  the  EITI  process  itself;  when  the  NEITI  was  first  setup  in  2004,  of  the  28  member  National  Stakeholders  Working  Group  overseeing  its  implementation,  only  two  were  drawn  from  civil  society.216    This  is  perhaps  not  unexpected  given  that  there  is  a  conspicuous  lack  of  a  coalition  of  civil  society  at  the  national  level  that  can  act  as  counterpoise  to  societal  division  on  the  one  hand,  and  rapacious  elites  on  the  other.217    Attempts  have  been  made  to  bring  together  civil  society  and  militant  groups  from  the  Niger  Delta  region,  yet  they  have  encountered  significant  obstacles,  including  the  weak  structures  of  most  organizations,  a  culture  of  violence,  and  the  absence  of  a  unifying  agenda.218    Arguably,  without  addressing  the  social  and  political  factors                                                                                                                  214  John  Harbeson,  ‘Civil  Society  and  Political  Renaissance  in  Africa’,  in  Naomi  Chazan  et  al.  (eds.),  Civil  Society  and  the  State  in  Africa,  Boulder,  Lynne  Rienner  Publishers,  1994,  pp.  2-­‐3.  215  Kalu,  State  Power,  Autarchy,  and  Political  Conquest,  pp.  18-­‐19.  216  Obe,  ‘The  Challenging  Case  of  Nigeria’,  pp.  154-­‐155.  217  Peter  Lewis,  Growing  Apart:  Oil,  Politics,  and  Economic  Change  in  Indonesia  and  Nigeria,  Ann  Arbor,  University  of  Michigan  Press,  2007,  p.  262.  218  Kew  and  Obi,  ‘Nigeria’,  p.  352.     70  
    • that  have  hindered  the  emergence  of  a  viable  civil  society  in  Nigeria,  the  mere  provision  of  incriminating  information  will  do  little  to  strengthen  their  position.     Despite  these  clear  obstacles  to  its  success,  the  EITI  and  its  Nigerian  counterpart  have  already  been  declared  as  victories.    The  CPI  compiled  by  TI,  using  expert  assessments  obtained  from  sources  both  internal  and  external  to  the  country,  has  seen  Nigeria  rise  from  last  in  1999,  to  equal  134th  (out  of  178  countries)  in  2010.219    Furthermore,  Nigeria  was  announced  as  a  compliant  country  in  March  of  2011,  notwithstanding  glaring  evidence  of  large  discrepancies  occurring  since  1999.220         Looking  at  the  TI’s  own  Global  Corruption  Barometer,  however,  which  measures  public  opinion  through  surveys  within  the  country  itself,  we  find  a  far  different  story.    Over  the  period  of  2007  to  2010,  14  percent  responded  that  corruption  had  decreased,  whereas  73  percent  felt  that  it  had  increased.221    The  reality  is  that,  regardless  of  the  rhetoric  and  backslapping  on  the  part  of  international  organizations  and  the  Nigerian  government,  civil  society  is  barely  represented  in  the  EITI  process,  and  the  same  structures  that  led  to  the  problem  remain,  as  do  the  individuals.    External  reform  will  simply  not  have  the  desired  effect,  unless  internal  processes  are  arrested  and  reversed.    This  dynamic  between  the  external  and  the  internal  has  been  wholly  overlooked  by  the  literature  on  the  resource  curse.                                                                                                                  219  Transparency  International,  Corruption  Perceptions  Index  2010,  p.  13.  220  Extractive  Industries  Transparency  Initiative,  Nigeria.  221  Transparency  International,  Global  Corruption  Barometer  2010,  Berlin,  Transparency  International,  2010,  p.  44,  retrieved  16  March  2011,  available  from  <http://www.transparency.org/policy_research/surveys_indices/gcb/2010/in_detail>.     71  
    •   My  argument  here  is  not  that  transparency  in  the  resource  sector  of  Nigeria  is  a  waste  of  time  and  effort.    Transparency  is  essential  to  the  functioning  of  an  open  democracy  whose  ends  are  directed  towards  the  public  good  rather  than  the  pockets  of  the  political  elites.    But  as  a  solution  to  the  resource  curse,  oil  sector  transparency  falls  despairingly  short.    Perhaps  if  the  underlying  cause  for  the  resource  curse  in  Nigeria  were  purely  the  nature  of  the  state  as  ‘rentier’  the  fair  and  transparent  distribution  of  oil  rents  would  alleviate  the  curse.    Yet  as  Kalu  Ndukwe  Kalu  argues,  rather  than  the  ‘rentier  state’  describing  the  nature  of  the  state  itself,  it  outlines  the  activities  undertaken  by  it.    In  this  way  it  is  a  ‘process-­‐driven  phenomenon’  as  opposed  to  a  definition  of  what  a  particular  state  is.         The  presence  of  natural  resources,  and  the  existence  for  an  international  market  for  them,  has  determined  the  processes  in  which  the  state  will  be  involved.222    But  natural  resource  abundance  does  not  determine  the  nature  of  the  state  itself,  nor  the  functioning  or  otherwise  of  Nigerian  society.      As  should  be  clear  from  the  above  discussion,  social  and  political  factors,  played  out  across  a  long  period  of  history,  have  entrenched  corruption,  division,  and  violence  within  a  weak  Nigerian  state,  precluding  successful  development.    It  will  take  wholesale  change  to  rend  this  asunder.                                                                                                                    222  Kalu,  State  Power,  Autarchy,  and  Political  Conquest,  p.  124.     72  
    •  Chapter  6:  Analysis  and  Conclusions     As  outlined  in  the  Introduction,  this  case  study  was  undertaken  to  determine  the  effectiveness  of  the  EITI  framework  as  a  cure  for  the  resource  curse,  to  see  how  one  country’s  historical  social  and  political  factors  entrenched  the  resource  curse  within  its  socio-­‐political  structures,  and  to  see  whether  deeper  structural  change  is  required  in  order  to  address  the  resource  curse.    The  central  argument  of  the  thesis  is  that  the  EITI  is  not  of  itself  a  cure  in  Nigeria,  and  cannot  be  so  unless  and  until  the  historical  legacy  is  understood  and  addressed,  and  major  structural  and  cultural  change  is  undertaken.           The  resource  curse  in  Nigeria  results  from  historical  processes  well  underway  by  the  time  of  the  1970s  oil  boom.    The  cumulative  effect  of  these  processes  resulted  in  a  weak  post-­‐colonial  state,  replete  with  division  and  instability,  as  well  as  endemic  and  systematic  corruption.    Oil  wealth  certainly  raised  the  stakes  for  those  competing  for  the  control  of  the  state.    Yet  the  structure  of  state  and  society  changed  little  in  qualitative  terms  upon  and  since  its  arrival.    Rather,  oil  came  to  dominate  economic,  social,  and  political  activity  in  a  way  that  concealed  the  social  and  political  deterioration  that  had  been  well  under  way  since  the  colonial  period.223    During  the  oil  boom  and  its  aftermath,  those  with  access  to  state  power  continued  to  treat  the  country’s  resources  much  as  they  had  before:  as  capital  to  be  deployed  in  the  maintenance  of  power,  rather                                                                                                                  223  Graf,  The  Nigerian  State,  pp.  218-­‐219.     73  
    • than  as  funds  through  which  to  alleviate  poverty,  much  to  the  detriment  of  Nigeria’s  development.224         For  these  reasons  the  EITI  framework  is  wholly  inadequate  in  the  case  of  Nigeria.    Rather  than  addressing  the  underlying  historical  factors,  which  to  a  large  degree  are  the  cause  of  the  resource  curse  in  that  country,  the  EITI  merely  seeks  to  confront  its  overriding  symbol,  the  oil-­‐sector.    While  oil-­‐sector  transparency  is  no  doubt  helpful,  as  a  cure  it  falls  short.    Externally-­‐driven  reform  of  this  kind  must  be  complemented  by  internal  structural  and  cultural  change,  preferably  originating  from  Nigerians  themselves.    While  it  is  not  possible  to  draw  definitive  conclusions  from  this  case  study  for  the  operation  of  the  EITI  in  other  oil  producing  and  resource  curse  affected  countries,  the  extent  of  the  difficulties  experienced  in  Nigeria  would  suggest  that  comparative  work  may  find  the  EITI  to  be  an  inadequate  response  to  the  problem  elsewhere.     These  findings  have  significant  implications  for  the  bodies  of  literature  discussed  in  chapter  two.    The  resource  curse  literature  has  been  directed  primarily  towards  cross-­‐country  statistical  analysis,  showing  correlations  between  abundant  natural  resources  and  measurements  of  poor  governance.    The  findings  above  indicate  that,  in  the  case  of  Nigeria,  the  cause  of  this  correlation  is  not  necessarily  abundance  itself,  but  the  historical  social  and  political  factors  which  have  been  discussed  in  chapter  four,  and  the  interaction  of  these  factors  with  abundance.    Thus,  the  literature  appears  to  be  lacking  in  case  study  research,  which  may  illuminate  the  causes  and  possible  solutions  to  the                                                                                                                  224  Obe,  ‘The  Challenging  Case  of  Nigeria’,  p.  149.     74  
    • resource  curse  further.    Secondly,  the  reality  of  the  entrenched  nature  of  the  causes  of  the  resource  curse  in  Nigeria  indicate  that  the  criticisms  of  the  EITI  framework  –  that  it  operates  merely  at  the  superficial  or  rhetorical  level  and  hence  does  not  attack  the  system  itself  –  may  be  well  founded.    What  is  required,  in  this  case,  is  more  fundamental  structural  and  cultural  change  rather  than  simply  tinkering  at  the  edges.    If  global  attention  remains  concentrated  on  the  edges,  the  causes  of  the  resource  curse  will  continue  to  fester,  and  constrain  the  development  of  a  large  part  of  the  global  economy.               75  
    •       76  
    •  Bibliography    Primary  Sources      Nigeria  Extractive  Industries  Transparency  Initiative,  Financial  Audit  1999-­‐2004:   Issues  in  Government  Financial  Systems,  November  2006,  retrieved  16   March  2011,  available  from  <http://www.neiti.org.ng/financial-­‐audit-­‐ reports.htm>.      Nigeria  Extractive  Industries  Transparency  Initiative,  Financial  Audit  1999-­‐2004:   Report  on  Financial  Flows,  November  2006,  retrieved  16  March  2011,   available  from  <http://www.neiti.org.ng/financial-­‐audit-­‐reports.htm>.      Nigeria  Extractive  Industries  Transparency  Initiative,  Financial  Audit  2005:  Report   on  the  Financial  Audit,  October  2008,  retrieved  16  March  2011,  available   from  <http://www.neiti.org.ng/2005%20Audit%20Reports.html>.      Nigeria  Extractive  Industries  Transparency  Initiative,  2006-­‐2008  EITI   Reconciliation:  Final  Report,  3  February  2011,  retrieved  16  March  2011,   available  from  <http://www.neiti.org.ng/2006-­‐ 2008ReconciliationReport.html>.      Transparency  International,  Corruption  Perceptions  Index  Report  2010,  Germany,   Transparency  International,  2010,  retrieved  16  March  2011,  available   from  <http://www.transparency.org/policy_research/surveys_indices   /cpi/2010/in_detail>.      Transparency  International,  Enhancing  Revenue  Transparency  in  Oil  and  Gas   Company  Reporting,  Transparency  International  Policy  Position  05/2008,   Germany,  Transparency  International,  2008,  retrieved  16  March  2011,   available  from  <http://www.transparency.org/publications/publications   /policy_positions/pp5_enhancing_revenue_transparency>.     77  
    •      Transparency  International,  Global  Corruption  Barometer  2010,  Germany,   Transparency  International,  2010,  retrieved  16  March  2011,  available   from  <http://www.transparency.org/policy_research/surveys_indices   /gcb/2010/in_detail>.      Websites    Extractive  Industries  Transparency  Initiative    <http://eiti.org/>      Nigerian  Extractive  Industries  Transparency  Initiative    <http://www.neiti.org.ng/>      Transparency  International    <http://www.transparency.org/>      United  Nations  Development  Programme,  Human  Development  Reports    <http://hdr.undp.org/en/>      Newspaper  Articles      Brock  J.,  ‘Nigerian  Election  Victory  for  Goodluck  Jonathan  Sparks  Riots’,  Guardian,   19  April  2011,  p.  16.      Campbell,  J.,  ‘Nigeria:  The  Morning  After’,  International  Herald  Tribune,  3  May   2011,  retrieved  4  June  2011,  available  from  <http://www.nytimes.com/   2011/05/03/opinion/03iht-­‐edcampbell03.html>.       78  
    •    Smith,  D.,  ‘Goodluck  Jonathan  Elected  President  as  Nigeria  Takes  a  Hopeful  Step’,   Guardian,  19  April  2011,  retrieved  27  April  2011,  available  from   <http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/apr/19/goodluck-­‐jonathan-­‐ president-­‐unrest-­‐nigeria>.      Reuters,  ‘Hundreds  Killed  in  Nigerian  Post-­‐Election  Violence’,  Guardian,  25  April   2011,  p.  22.      Reuters,  ‘Bomb  Blast  at  Nigerian  Army  Barracks’,  The  Guardian,  30  May  2011,   retrieved  4  June  2011,  available  from  <http://www.guardian.co.uk/world   /2011/may/30/bomb-­‐blast-­‐nigerian-­‐army-­‐barracks?INTCMP=SRCH>.      Secondary  Sources      Aborisade,  O.  and  Mundt,  R.,  Politics  in  Nigeria,  New  York,  Longman,  1998.      Acemoglu,  D.  et  al.,  An  African  Success  Story:  Botswana,  CEPR  Discussion  Paper   3219,  Centre  for  Economic  Policy  Research,  London,  2002.      Adebayo,  A.G.  and  Falola,  T.,  ‘Politicians  and  the  Economy’,  in  S.  Gbadegesin  (ed.)   The  Politicization  of  Society  during  Nigerias  Second  Republic,  1979-­‐83,   Lewiston,  Edwin  Mellen  Press,  1991,  pp.  13-­‐50.      Adekson,  A.O.,  The  "Civil  society"  Problematique:  Deconstructing  Civility  and   Southern  Nigerias  Ethnic  Radicalization,  New  York,  Routledge,  2003.      Adeola,  F.  O.,  ‘From  Colonialism  to  Internal  Colonialism  and  Crude   Socioenvironmental  Injustice:  Anatomy  of  Violent  Conflicts  in  the  Niger   Delta  of  Nigeria’,  in  F.C.  Steady  (ed.),  Environmental  Justice  in  the  New   Millennium:  Global  Perspectives  on  Race,  Ethnicity,  and  Human  Rights,  New   York,  Palgrave  Macmillan,  2009,  pp.  135-­‐164.       79  
    •  Afeka,  C.,  ‘Playing  Civil  Society  tunes:  Corruption  and  Misunderstanding  Nigerias   “Real”  Political  Institutions’,  Review  of  African  Political  Economy,  Vol.  89,   2001,  pp.  461-­‐465.      Afolayan,  F.,  ‘Nigeria:  A  Political  Entity  and  a  Society’,  in  P.A.  Beckett  and  C.   Young  (eds.),  Dilemmas  of  Democracy  in  Nigeria,  Rochester,  University  of   Rochester  Press,  1997,  pp.  45-­‐62.      Agbese,  P.O.  and  Kieh,  Jnr.,  G.K.,  ‘Introduction:  Democratizing  States  and  State   Reconstitution  in  Africa’,  in  P.O.  Agbese  and  G.K.  Kieh,  Jnr.  (eds.),   Reconstituting  the  State  in  Africa,  New  York,  Palgrave  Macmillan,  2007,  pp.   3-­‐29.      Ahire,  P.T.,  Imperial  Policing:  The  Emergence  and  Role  of  the  Police  in  Colonial   Nigeria,  1860-­‐1960,  Philadelphia,  Open  University  Press,  1991.      Ake,  C.,  ‘Political  Ethnicity  and  State-­‐Building  in  Nigeria’,  in  W.A.  van  Horne  (ed.),   Global  Convulsions:  Race,  Ethnicity,  and  Nationalism  at  the  End  of  the   Twentieth-­‐Century,  Albany,  State  University  of  New  York  Press,  1997,  pp.   299-­‐314.        Ako,  R.T.  and  Okonmah,  P.,  ‘Minority  Rights  Issues  in  Nigeria:  A  Theoretical   Analysis  of  Historical  and  Contemporary  Conflicts  in  the  Oil-­‐Rich  Niger   Delta  Region’,  International  Journal  on  Minority  and  Group  Rights,  Vol.  16,   2009,  pp.  53-­‐65.      Alao,  A.,  Natural  Resources  and  Conflict  in  Africa:  The  Tragedy  of  Endowment,   Rochester,  Rochester  Press,  2007.          Alubo,  S.,  ‘The  Imperative  of  Reconstructing  the  State  in  Nigeria:  The  Politics  of   Power,  Welfare,  and  Imperialism  in  the  New  Millennium’,  in  P.O.  Agbese   and  G.K.  Kieh,  Jnr.  (eds.),  Reconstituting  the  State  in  Africa,  New  York,   Palgrave  Macmillan,  2007,  pp.  205-­‐232.         80  
    • Amuwo,  A.,  ‘Towards  a  New  Political  Economy  of  the  Niger  Delta  Question  in   Nigeria’,  Politikon,  Vol.  36,  No.  2,  2009,  pp.  237-­‐257.      Apter,  A.H.,  The  Pan-­‐African  Nation:  Oil  and  the  Spectacle  of  Culture  in  Nigeria,   Chicago,  University  of  Chicago  Press,  2005.      Ariweriokuma,  S.,  The  Political  Economy  of  Oil  and  Gas  in  Africa:  The  Case  of   Nigeria,  New  York,  Routledge,  2008.      Ascher,  W.,  Why  Governments  Waste  Natural  Resources:  Policy  Failures  in   Developing  Countries,  Baltimore,  John  Hopkins  University  Press,  1999.      Atkinson,  G.  and  Hamilton,  K.,  ‘Savings,  Growth  and  the  Resource  Curse   Hypothesis’,  World  Development,  Vol.  31,  No.  11,  2003,  pp.  1793-­‐1807.      Auty,  R.M.,  Sustaining  Development  in  Mineral  Economies:  The  Resource  Curse   Thesis,  London,  Routledge,  1993.      Auty,  R.M.,  ‘Conclusions:  Resource  Abundance,  Growth  Collapses,  and  Policy’,  in   R.M.  Auty  (ed.),  Resource  Abundance  and  Economic  Development,  Oxford,   Oxford  University  Press,  2001,  pp.  315-­‐328.      Auty,  R.M.,  ‘Introduction  and  Overview’,  in  R.M.  Auty  (ed.),  Resource  Abundance   and  Economic  Development,  Oxford,  Oxford  University  Press,  2001,  pp.  3-­‐ 16.      Auty,  R.M.,  ‘Natural  Resources  and  Civil  Strife’,  Geopolitics,  Vol.  9,  No.  1,  2004,  pp.   29-­‐49.      Ayittey,  G.B.N.,  Africa  in  Chaos,  New  York,  St.  Martins  Press,  1998.      Balassa,  B.,  The  Process  of  Industrial  Development  and  Alternative  Development   Strategies,  Princeton,  Princeton  University  Press,  1981.     81  
    •    Bannon,  I.  and  Collier,  P.,  ‘Natural  Resources  and  Conflict:  What  We  Can  Do’,  in  I.   Bannon  and  P.  Collier  (eds.),  Natural  Resources  and  Violent  Conflict:   Options  and  Actions,  Washington,  World  Bank,  2003,  pp.  1-­‐16.      Barkan,  J.D.,  ‘Resurrecting  Modernization  Theory  and  the  Emergence  of  Civil   Society  in  Kenya  and  Nigeria’,  in  D.E.  Apter  and  C.R.  Rosberg  (eds.),   Political  Development  and  the  New  Realism  in  Sub-­‐Saharan  Africa,   Charlottesville,  University  Press  of  Virginia,  1994,  pp.  87-­‐116.      Barton,  B.  et  al.,  ‘Conclusions’,  in  B.  Barton  et  al.  (eds.),  Regulating  Energy  and   Natural  Resources,  New  York,  Oxford  University  Press,  2006,  pp.  401-­‐415.      Beblawi,  H.,  ‘The  Rentier  State  in  the  Arab  World’,  in  H.  Beblawi  and  G.  Luciani   (eds.),  The  Rentier  State,  New  York,  Croom  Helm,  1987,  pp.  49-­‐62.      Benner,  T.  and  de  Oliveira,  R.S,  ‘The  Good/Bad  Nexus  in  Global  Energy   Governance’,  in  A.  Goldthau  and  J.M.  Witte  (eds.)  Global  Energy   Governance:  The  New  Rules  of  the  Game,  Washington,  Brookings   Institution  Press,  2010,  pp.  287-­‐314.      Berry,  S.S.,  ‘Oil  and  the  Disappearing  Peasantry:  Accumulation,  Differentiation,   and  Underdevelopment  in  Western  Nigeria’,  in  M.J.  Watts  (ed.),  State,  Oil,   and  Agriculture  in  Nigeria,  Berkeley,  Institute  of  International  Studies,   University  of  California,  1987,  pp.  202-­‐222.      Biereenu-­‐Nnabugwu,  M.  and  Onu,  G.,  ‘Dialectics  of  Patronage  Politics  and   Representative  Democracy:  The  Case  of  Anambra  state  of  Nigeria’,  in  V.O.   Okafor  (ed.),  Nigerias  Stumbling  Democracy  and  its  Implications  for   Africas  Democratic  Movement,  Westport,  Praeger  Security  International,   2008,  pp.  56-­‐78.      Blaikie,  N.W.H.,  Designing  Social  Research:  The  Logic  of  Anticipation,  Malen,  Polity   Press,  2000.       82  
    •  Brownsberger,  W.N.,  ‘Development  and  Governmental  Corruption:  Materialism   and  Political  Fragmentation  in  Nigeria’,  Journal  of  Modern  African  Studies,   Vol.  21,  No.  2,  1983,  pp.  215-­‐233.      Brunnschweiler,  C.N.,  ‘Cursing  the  Blessings?  Natural  Resource  Abundance,   Institutions,  and  Economic  Growth’,  World  Development,  Vol.  36,  No.  3,   2008,  pp.  399-­‐419.      Burno,  M.  and  Sachs,  J.,  ‘Energy  and  Resources  Allocation:  A  Dynamic  Model  of   the  "Dutch  Disease"’,  Review  of  Economic  Studies,  Vol.  XLIX,  pp.  845-­‐859.      Campbell,  D.T.,  ‘"Degrees  of  Freedom"  and  the  Case  Study’,  in  M.  David  (ed.),  Case   Study  Research,  Vol.  III,  London,  SAGE,  2006,  pp.  137-­‐154.      Chaudhry,  K.A.,  ‘Economic  Liberalization  and  the  Lineages  of  the  Rentier  State’,   Comparative  Politics,  Vol.  27,  No.  1,  1994,  pp.  1-­‐25.      Clark,  J.,  ‘Petro-­‐Politics  in  the  Congo’,  Journal  of  Democracy,  Vol.  8,  No.  3,  1997,  pp.   62-­‐76.      Collier,  P.  and  Hoeffler,  A.,  ‘On  Economic  Causes  of  Civil  War’,  Oxford  Economic   Papers,  Vol.  50,  No.  4,  1998,  pp.  563-­‐573.      Collier,  P.  and  Hoeffler,  A.,  ‘Greed  and  Grievance  in  Civil  War’,  Oxford  Economic   Papers,  Vol.  56,  No.  4,  2004,  pp.  563-­‐595.      Collier,  P.  and  Hoeffler,  A.,  ‘Rents,  Governance,  and  Conflict’,  Journal  of  Conflict   Resolution,  Vol.  49,  No.  4,  2005,  pp.  625-­‐633.      Collier,  P.,  et  al.,  ‘Beyond  Greed  and  Grievance:  Feasibility  and  Civil  War’,  Oxford   Economic  Papers,  Vol.  61,  No.  1,  2009,  pp.  1-­‐27.         83  
    • Corden,  W.M.  and  Neary,  J.P.,  ‘Booming  Sector  and  De-­‐Industrialisation  in  a  Small   Open  Economy’,  The  Economic  Journal,  Vol.  92,  No.  368,  pp.  825-­‐848.      Davis,  G.A.,  ‘Learning  to  Love  the  Dutch  Disease:  Evidence  from  the  Mineral   Economies’,  World  Development,  Vol.  23,  No.  10,  1995,  pp.  1765-­‐1779.      Diamond,  L.,  The  Spirit  of  Democracy:  The  Struggle  to  Build  Free  Societies   Throughout  the  World,  New  York,  Times  Books,  2008.      Drake,  P.J.,  ‘Natural  Resources  Versus  Foreign  Borrowing  in  Economic   Development’,  Economic  Journal,  Vol.  82,  No.  327,  1972,  pp.  951-­‐962.      Eifert,  B.  et  al.,  ‘The  Political  Economy  of  Fiscal  Policy  and  Economic  Management   in  Oil  Exporting  Countries’,  in  J.  Davis  et  al.  (eds.),  Fiscal  Policy   Formulation  and  Implementation  in  Developing  Countries,  Washington,   International  Monetary  Fund,  2003,  pp.  82-­‐122.      Egwaikhide,  F.O.  and  Isumonah,  V.A.,  ‘Institutional  Basis  of  Ethno-­‐Religious   Competition  for  Resources  in  Nigeria’,  Journal  of  Third  World  Studies,  Vol.   26,  No.  2,  2009,  pp.  227-­‐253.      Eigen,  P.,  ‘A  Coalition  to  Combat  Corruption:  TI,  EITI,  and  Civil  Society’,  in  R.I.   Rotberg  (ed.),  Corruption,  Global  Security,  and  World  Order,  Washington,   Brookings  Institute  Press,  2009,  pp.  416-­‐429.      Ejobowah,  J.B.,  ‘Constitutionalism  and  Political  Inclusion  in  Nigeria’,  in  O.  Akiba   (ed.),  Constitutionalism  and  Society  in  Africa,  Aldershot,  Ashgate,  2004,  pp.   103-­‐117.      Elechi,  O.O.,  Doing  Justice  Without  the  State:  The  Afikpo  (Ehugbo)  Nigeria  Model,     New  York,  Routledge,  2006.         84  
    • Falola,  T.  ‘Christian  Radicalism  and  Nigerian  Politics’,  in  P.A.  Beckett  and  C.   Young  (eds.),  Dilemmas  of  Democracy  in  Nigeria,  Rochester,  University  of   Rochester  Press,  1997,  pp.  265-­‐282.      Falola,  T.,  Colonialism  and  Violence  in  Nigeria,  Bloomington,  Indiana  University   Press,  1999.      Falola,  T.  and  Heaton,  M.,  A  History  of  Nigeria,  Cambridge,  Cambridge  University   Press,  2008.      Fenster,  M.,  ‘The  Opacity  of  Transparency’,  Iowa  Law  Review,  Vol.  91,  No.  3,  2006,   pp.  885-­‐949.      Firger,  D.M.,  ‘Transparency  and  the  Natural  Resource  Curse:  Examining  the  New   Extraterritorial  Information  Forcing  Rules  in  the  Dodd-­‐Frank  Wall  Street   Reform  Act  of  2010’,  Georgetown  Journal  of  International  Law,  Vol.  41,   2010,  pp.  1043-­‐1095.      Florini,  A.and  Sovacool,  B.K.,  ‘Who  Governs  Energy?    The  Challenges  Facing   Global  Energy  Governance’,  Energy  Policy,  Vol.  37,  2009,  pp.  5239-­‐5248.      Foster,  P.  et  al.,  ‘Case  Study  and  Generalization’,  in  P.  Foster  et  al.  (eds.)  Case   Study  Method:  Key  Issues,  Key  Texts,  London,  SAGE,  2000,  pp.  98-­‐115.      Foster,  P.  et  al.,  ‘Case  Study  and  Theory’,  in  P.  Foster  et  al.  (eds.)  Case  Study   Method:  Key  Issues,  Key  Texts,  London,  SAGE,  2000,  pp.  234-­‐258.      Gboyega,  A.,  ‘Nigeria:  Conflict  Unresolved’,  in  I.W.  Zartman  (ed.),  Governance  as   Conflict  Management:  Politics  and  Violence  in  West  Africa,  Washington,   Brookings  Institution  Press,  2007,  pp.  149-­‐196.      Gelb,  A.H.  and  Associates,  Oil  Windfalls:  Blessing  or  Curse?,  New  York,  Oxford   University  Press,  1988.       85  
    •  Gerring,  J.,  Case  Study  Research:  Principles  and  Practices,  Cambridge,  Cambridge   University  Press,  2007.      Gillies,  A.,  ‘Obasanjo,  the  Donor  Community  and  Reform  Implementation  in   Nigeria,  Round  Table,  Vol.  96,  No.  392,  2007,  pp.  569-­‐586.      Gillies,  A.,  ‘Reputational  Concerns  and  the  Emergence  of  Oil  Sector  Transparency   as  an  International  Norm’,  International  Studies  Quarterly,  Vol.  54,  No.  1,   2010,  pp.  103-­‐126.      Global  Integrity,  Global  Integrity  Scorecard:  Nigeria  2008,  Washington,  Global   Integrity,  2008,  retrieved  8  March  2011,  available  from   <http://report.globalintegrity.org/  Nigeria/2008>.      Goldthau,  A.  et  al.,  ‘Global  Energy  Governance:  The  Way  Forward’,  in  A.  Goldthau   and  J.M.  Witte  (eds.),  Global  Energy  Governance:  The  New  Rules  of  the   Game,  Washington,  Brookings  Institution  Press,  2010,  pp.  341-­‐356.      Goldthau,  A.  and  Witte,  J.M.,  ‘The  Role  of  Rules  and  Institutions  in  Global  Energy:   An  Introduction’,  in  A.  Goldthau  and  J.M.  Witte  (eds.),  Global  Energy   Governance:  The  New  Rules  of  the  Game,  Washington,  Brookings  Institute   Press,  2010,  pp.  1-­‐21.      Graf,  T.V.D.  et  al.,  Global  Energy  Governance  in  a  Multipolar  World,  Burlington,   Ashgate,  2010.      Graf,  W.  D.,  The  Nigerian  State:  Political  Economy,  State  Class  and  Political  System   in  the  Post-­‐Colonial  Era,  London,  J.  Currey,  1988.      Guyer,  J.I.,  ‘The  Spatial  Dimensions  of  Civil  Society  in  Africa:  An  Anthropologist   Looks  at  Nigeria’,  in  N.  Chazan  et  al.  (eds.),  Civil  Society  and  the  State  in   Africa,  Boulder,  Lynne  Rienner  Publishers,  1994,  pp.  215-­‐231.         86  
    • Gylfason,  T.  et  al.,  ‘A  Mixed  Blessing:  Natural  Resources  and  Economic  Growth’,   Macroeconomic  Dynamics,  Vol.  3,  No.  2,  1999,  pp.  204-­‐225.      Harbeson,  J.W.,  ‘Civil  Society  and  Political  Renaissance  in  Africa’,  in  N.  Chazan  et   al.  (eds.),  Civil  Society  and  the  State  in  Africa,  Boulder,  Lynne  Rienner   Publishers,  1994,  pp.  1-­‐29.      Harneit-­‐Sievers,  A.,  Constructions  of  Belonging:  Igbo  Communities  and  the   Nigerian  State  in  the  Twentieth-­‐Century,  Rochester,  University  of   Rochester  Press,  2006.      Haufler,  V.,  ‘Disclosure  as  Governance:  The  Extractive  Industries  Transparency   Initiative  and  Resource  Management  in  the  Developing  World’,  Global   Environmental  Politics,  Vol.  10,  No.  3,  2010,  pp.  53-­‐73.      Hilson  G.  and  Maconachie,  R.,  ‘"Good  Governance"  and  the  Extractive  Industries   in  Sub-­‐Saharan  Africa’,  Mineral  Processing  &  Extractive  Metallurgy  Review,   Vol.  30,  pp.  52-­‐100.      Human  Rights  Watch,  Criminal  Politics:  Violence,  “Godfathers”,  and  Corruption  in   Nigeria,  9  October  2007,  Vol.  16(A),  retrieved  11  January  2011,  available   from  <http://www.hrw.org/en/reports/2007/10/08/criminal-­‐politics-­‐ 0>.      Ibeanu,  O.  and  Luckham,  R.,  ‘Nigeria:  Political  Violence,  Governance  and   Corporate  Responsibility  in  a  Petro-­‐State’,  in  M.  Kaldor  et  al.  (eds.)  Oil   Wars,  London,  Pluto  Press,  2007,  pp.  41-­‐99.      Ibrahim,  J.  ‘Obstacles  to  Democratization  in  Nigeria’,  in  P.A.  Beckett  and  C.  Young   (eds.),  Dilemmas  of  Democracy  in  Nigeria,  Rochester,  University  of   Rochester  Press,  1997,  pp.  155-­‐174.      Ikein,  A.A.,  The  Impact  of  Oil  on  a  Developing  Country:  The  Case  of  Nigeria,  New   York,  Praeger,  1990.       87  
    •  Isham,  J.,  ‘The  Varieties  of  Resource  Experience:  Natural  Resource  Export   Structures  and  the  Political  Economy  of  Economic  Growth’,  World  Bank   Economic  Review,  Vol.  19,  No.  2,  2005,  pp.  141-­‐174.      Jensen,  N.  and  Wantchekon,  L.,  ‘Resource  Wealth  and  Political  Regimes  in  Africa,’   Comparative  Political  Studies,  Vol.  37,  pp.  816-­‐841.      Joseph,  R.,  ‘Autocracy,  Violence,  and  Ethnomilitary  Rule  in  Nigeria’,  in  R.  Joseph   (ed.),  State,  Conflict,  and  Democracy  in  Africa,  Boulder,  Lynne  Rienner   Publishers,  1999,  pp.  359-­‐  373.      Kalu,  K.N.,  State  Power,  Autarchy,  and  Political  Conquest  in  Nigerian  Federalism,   Lanham,  Lexington  Books,  2008.      Karl,  T.L.,  The  Paradox  of  Plenty:  Oil  Booms  and  Petro-­‐States,  Berkeley,  University   of  California  Press,  1997.      Kazah-­‐Toure,  T.,  ‘Nigeria:  Challenges  to  the  State  and  Ways  of  Breaking  Through   the  Quagmire’,  in  G.K.  Kieh,  Jnr.  (ed.),  Beyond  State  Failure  and  Collapse:   Making  the  State  Relevant  in  Africa,  Lanham,  Lexington  Books,  2007,  pp.   151-­‐175.      Kew,  D.  and  Obi,  C.,  ‘Nigeria:  Dilemmas  of  Militarization  and  Co-­‐optation  in  the   Niger  Delta’,  in  T.  Paffenholz  (ed.),  Civil  Society  &  Peacebuilding:  A  Critical   Assessment,  Boulder,  Lynne  Rienner  Publishers,  2010,  pp.  351-­‐377.      Kolstad,  I.  and  Wiig,  A.,  ‘Is  Transparency  the  Key  to  Reducing  Corruption  in   Resource-­‐Rich  Countries?’,  World  Development,  Vol.  37,  No.  3,  2009,  pp.   521-­‐532.      Lane,  P.R.  and  Tornell,  A.,  ‘The  Voracity  Effect’,  The  American  Economic  Review,   Vol.  89,  No.  1,  1999,  pp.  22-­‐46.         88  
    • Lederman,  D.  and  Maloney,  W.F.  ‘Neither  Curse  nor  Destiny:  Introduction  to   Natural  Resources  and  Development’,  in  D.  Lederman  and  W.F.  Maloney   (eds.)  Natural  Resources:  Neither  Curse  nor  Destiny,  Palo  Alto,  Stanford   University  Press,  2007,  pp.  1-­‐12.      Leite,  C.  and  Weidmann,  J.,  Does  Mother  Nature  Corrupt?    Natural  Resources,   Corruption,  and  Economic  Growth,  Washington,  International  Monetary   Fund,  1999.      Levin,  J.V.,  The  Export  Economies:  Their  Pattern  of  Development  in  Historical   Perspective,  Cambridge,  Harvard  University  Press,  1960.      Lewis,  P.,  ‘From  Prebendalism  to  Predation:  The  Political  Economy  of  Decline  in   Nigeria’,  Journal  of  Modern  African  Studies,  Vol.  34,  No.  1,  1996,  pp.  79-­‐103.      Lewis,  P.,  ‘Nigeria:  An  End  to  the  Permanent  Transition?’,  Journal  of  Democracy,   Vol.  10,  No.  1,  1999,  pp.  141-­‐156.      Lewis,  P.  ‘Politics  and  the  Economy:  A  Downward  Spiral’,  in  P.A.  Beckett  and  C.   Young  (eds.)  Dilemmas  of  Democracy  in  Nigeria,  Rochester,  University  of   Rochester  Press,  1997,  pp.  303-­‐326.      Lewis,  P.,  Growing  Apart:  Oil,  Politics,  and  Economic  Change  in  Indonesia  and   Nigeria,  Ann  Arbor,  University  of  Michigan  Press,  2007.      Lewis,  W.A.,  The  Theory  of  Economic  Growth,  London,  Allen  and  Unwin,  1955.      Lock,  C.,  ‘Ken  Saro-­‐Wiwa,  of  "The  Pacification  of  the  Primitive  Tribes  of  the   Lower  Niger"’,  in  C.W.  McLuckie  A.  McPhail  (eds.),  Ken  Saro-­‐Wira:  Writer   and  Political  Activist,  Boulder,  Lynne  Rienner  Publishers,  2000,  pp.  3-­‐16.      Luong,  P.J.  and  Weinthal,  E.,  ‘Energy  Wealth  and  Tax  Reform  in  Russia  and   Kazakhstan’,  Resources  Policy,  Vol.  27,  2001,  pp.  215-­‐223.       89  
    • Mahdavy,  H.,  ‘Patterns  and  Problems  of  Economic  Development  in  Rentier  States:   The  Case  of  Iran’,  in  M.A.  Cook  (ed.)  Studies  in  Economic  History  of  the   Middle  East:  From  the  Rise  of  Islam  to  the  Present  Day,  Oxford,  Oxford   University  Press,  1970,  pp.  428-­‐467.      McLaren,  J.,  ‘A  Political  Assessment:  Genocide  in  Nigeria:  The  Ogoni  Tragedy’,  in   C.W.  McLuckie  A.  McPhail  (eds.),  Ken  Saro-­‐Wira:  Writer  and  Political   Activist,  Boulder,  Lynne  Rienner  Publishers,  2000,  pp.  17-­‐31.      Muhtar,  M.  et  al.,  ‘Introduction’,  in  M.  Muhtar  et  al.  (eds.),  The  Debt  Trap  in   Nigeria:  Towards  a  Sustainable  Debt  Strategy,  Trenton,  Africa  World  Press,   2002,  pp.  1-­‐19.      Kaldor,  M.  et  al.,  ‘Introduction’,  in  M.  Kaldor  et  al.  (eds.),  Oil  Wars,  London,  Pluto   Press,  2007,  pp.  1-­‐40.      McFerson,  H.M.,  ‘Governance  and  Hyper-­‐Corruption  in  Resource-­‐Rich  African   Countries’,  Third  World  Quarterly,  Vol.  30,  No.  8,  2009,  pp.  1529-­‐1548.      McFerson,  H.M.,  ‘Extractive  Industries  and  African  Democracy:  Can  the  "Resource   Curse"  Be  Exorcised?’,  International  Studies  Perspectives,  Vol.  11,  2010,  pp.   335-­‐353.      Mehlum,  H.  et  al.,  ‘Institutions  and  the  Resource  Curse’,  The  Economic  Journal,  Vol.   116,  No.  508,  2006,  pp.  1-­‐20.      Mimiko,  F.,  ‘Census  in  Nigeria:  The  Politics  and  the  Imperative  of  Depoliticization’,   African  and  Asian  Studies,  Vol.  5,  No.  1,  2006,  pp.  1-­‐22.      Mitchell,  J.C.,  ‘Case  and  Situation  Analysis’,  in  M.  David  (ed.)  Case  Study  Research,   Vol.  II,  London,  SAGE,  2006,  pp.  59-­‐84.         90  
    • Mitra,  P.,  ‘Conclusions’,  in  P.  Mitra  (ed.),  Adjustment  in  Oil-­‐Importing  Developing   Countries:  A  Comparative  Economic  Analysis,  Cambridge,  Cambridge   University  Press,  1994,  pp.  289-­‐303.      Neary,  J.P.  and  Wijnbergen,  S.V.,  ‘Introduction’,  in  Neary  J.P.  and  S.  V.  Wijbergen   (eds.),  Natural  Resources  and  the  Macroeconomy,  Oxford,  Basil  Blackwell,   1986,  pp.  1-­‐11.      Neary  J.P.  and  Wijnbergen,  S.V.,  ‘Natural  Resources  and  the  Macroeconomy:  A   Theoretical  Framework’,  in  J.P.  Neary  and  S.V.  Wijnbergen  (eds.),  Natural   Resources  and  the  Macroeconomy.  Oxford,   Basil   Blackwell,   1986,   pp.   13-­‐45.      Nixon,  R.,  ‘Pipe  Dreams:  Ken  Saro-­‐Wiwa,  Environmental  Justice,  and   Microminority  Rights’,  in  C.W.  McLuckie  and  A.  McPhail  (eds.),  Ken  Saro   Wira:  Writer  and  Political  Activist,  Boulder,  Lynne  Rienner  Publishers,   2000,  pp.  109-­‐126.      North,  D.C.,  Institutions,  Institutional  Change,  and  Economic  Performance,   Cambridge,  Cambridge  University  Press,  1990.      Nwogu,  N.V.,  Shaping  Truth,  Reshaping  Justice:  Sectarian  Politics  and  the  Nigerian   Truth  Commission,  Lanham,  Lexington  Books,  2007.      Obe,  A.,  ‘The  Challenging  Case  of  Nigeria’,  in  A.  Florini  (ed.),  The  Right  to  Know:   Transparency  for  an  Open  World,  New  York,  Columbia  University  Press,   2007,  pp.  143-­‐175.      Obianyo,  N.E.,  ‘Democracy  on  Sale:  The  2007  Nigerian  Elections  and  the  Future  of   the  Democratic  Movement  in  Africa’,  in  V.O.  Okafor  (ed.)  Nigerias   Stumbling  Democracy  and  its  Implications  for  Africas  Democratic   Movement,  Westport,  Praeger  Security  International,  2006,  pp.  35-­‐55.      Okafor,  V.O.,  A  Roadmap  for  Understanding  African  Politics:  Leadership  and   Political  Integration  in  Nigeria,  New  York,  Routledge,  2006.       91  
    •  Okruhlik,  G.  ‘Rentier  Wealth,  Unruly  Law,  and  the  Rise  of  Opposition:  The   Political  Economy  of  Oil  States’,  Comparative  Politics,  Vol.  31,  No.  3,  1999,   pp.  295-­‐316.      Olukoshi,  A.O.,  ‘Bourgeois  Social  Movements  and  the  Struggle  for  Democracy  in   Nigeria:  An  Inquiry  into  the  "Kaduna  Mafia"’,  in  M.  Mamdani  and  E.   Wamba-­‐dia-­‐Wamba  (eds.),  African  Studies  in  Social  Movements  and   Democracy,  Dakar,  Codesria,  pp.  245-­‐278.      Omeje,  K.,  ‘The  State,  Conflict  and  Evolving  Politics  in  the  Niger  Delta,  Nigeria’.   Review  of  African  Political  Economy,  Vol.  31,  No.  101,  2004,  pp.  425-­‐440.      Omorogbe,  Y.O.,  ‘Alternative  Regulation  and  Governance  Reform  in  Resource-­‐ Rich  Developing  Countries  of  Africa’,  in  B.  Barton  et  al.  (eds.)  Regulating   Energy  and  Natural  Resources,  New  York,  Oxford  University  Press,  2006,   pp.  39-­‐66.      Omotola,  J.  S.,  ‘"Liberation  movements"  and  Rising  Violence  in  the  Niger  Delta:   The  New  Contentious  Site  of  Oil  and  Environmental  Politics’,  Studies  in   Conflict  &  Terrorism,  Vol.  33,  2010,  pp.  36-­‐54.      Osaghae,  E.E.,  ‘Interstate  Relations  in  Nigeria’,  Publius,  Vol.  24,  No.  4,  1994,  pp.   83-­‐98.      Osoba,  S.O.,  ‘Corruption  in  Nigeria:  Historical  Perspectives’,  Review  of  African   Political  Economy,  Vol.  23,  No.  69,  1996,  pp.  371-­‐386.      Pearson,  S.,  Petroleum  and  the  Nigerian  Economy,  Stanford,  Stanford  University   Press,  1970.      Philip,  G.,  The  Political  Economy  of  International  Oil,  Edinburgh,  Edinburgh   University  Press,  1994.         92  
    • Prebisch,  R.,  The  Economic  Development  of  Latin  America  and  its  Principal   Problems,  New  York,  United  Nations  Department  of  Economics,  1950.      Reynal-­‐Querol,  M.,  ‘Ethnicity,  Political  Systems,  and  Civil  Wars’,  Journal  of  Conflict   Resolution,  Vol.  46,  No.  1,  2002,  pp.  29-­‐54.      Ross,  M.L.  ‘Review:  The  Political  Economy  of  the  Resource  Curse’,  World  Politics,   Vol.  51,  No.  2,  1999,  pp.  297-­‐322.      Ross,  M.L.,  ‘Does  Oil  Hinder  Democracy?’,  World  Politics,  Vol.  53,  No.  3,  2001,  pp.   325-­‐361.      Ross,  M.L.,  ‘Oil,  Drugs,  and  Diamonds:  The  Varying  Role  of  Natural  Resources  in   Civil  War’,  in  K.  Ballentine  and  J.  Sherman  (eds.)  The  Political  Economy  of   Armed  Conflict:  Beyond  Greed  and  Grievance,  Boulder,  Lynne  Rienner   Publishers,  2003,  pp.  47-­‐70.      Ross,  M.L.,  ‘What  do  we  Know  about  Natural  Resources  and  Civil  War?’,  Journal  of   Peace  Research,  Vol.  41,  No.  3,  2004,  pp.  337-­‐356.      Rosser,  A.,  The  Political  Economy  of  the  Resource  Curse:  A  Literature  Review,   Brighton,  Institute  of  Development  Studies,  University  of  Sussex,  2006.      Rostow,  W.,  The  Stages  of  Economic  Growth:  A  Non-­‐Communist  Manifesto,   Cambridge,  Cambridge  University  Press,  1960.      Sachs,  J.D.  and  Warner,  A.M.,  Natural  Resource  Abundance  and  Economic  Growth,   National  Bureau  of  Economic  Research  Working  Paper  5398,  National   Bureau  of  Economic  Research,  Cambridge,  1995.      Sachs,  J.D.  and  Warner,  A.M.,  ‘The  Curse  of  Natural  Resources’,  European   Economic  Review,  Vol.  45,  No.  4,  2001,  pp.  827-­‐838.         93  
    • Sala-­‐i-­‐Martin,  X.  and  Subramanian,  A.,  Addressing  the  Natural  Resource  Curse:  An   Illustration  from  Nigeria,  Washington,  International  Monetary  Fund,  2003.      Shafer,  D.M.,  Winners  and  Losers:  How  Sectors  Shape  the  Developmental  Prospects   of  States,  Ithaca,  Cornell  University  Press,  1994.      Shaxson,  N.,  ‘Oil,  Corruption  and  the  Resource  Curse’,  International  Affairs,  Vol.   83,  No.  6,  2007,  pp.  1123-­‐1140.      Shaxson,  N.,  Poisoned  Wells:  The  Dirty  Politics  of  African  Oil,  New  York,  Palgrave   Macmillan,  2007.      Sherk,  D.R.,  ‘The  Cultural  Dimensions  of  Corruption:  Reflections  on  Nigeria’,  in  M.   Johnston   (ed.),   Civil  Society  and  Corruption:  Mobilizing  for  Reform,  Lanham,   University  Press  of  America,  2005,  pp.  61-­‐70.      Siegle,  J.,  ‘Governance  Strategies  to  Remedy  the  Natural  Resource  Curse’,   International  Social  Science  Journal,  Vol.  57,  2009,  pp.  45-­‐55.      Singer,  H.W.,  ‘The  Distribution  of  Gains  Between  Investing  and  Borrowing   Countries’,  American  Economic  Review,  Vol.  40,  No.  2,  1950,  pp.  473-­‐485.      Smith,  B.,  ‘Oil  Wealth  and  Regime  Survival  in  the  Developing  World,  1960-­‐1999’,   American  Journal  of  Political  Science,  Vol.  48,  No.  2,  2004,  pp.  232-­‐246.      Smith,  D.J.,  ‘The  Paradoxes  of  Popular  Participation  in  Corruption  in  Nigeria’,  in   R.I.  Rotberg  (ed.),  Corruption,  Global  Security,  and  World  Order,   Washington,  Brookings  Institution  Press,  2009,  pp.  283-­‐309.      Suberu,  R.T.,  ‘Institutions,  Political  Culture,  and  Constitutionalism  in  Nigeria’,  in   M.  J.  Baun  and  D.P.  Franklin  (eds.)  Political  Culture  and  Constitutionalism:   A  Comparative  Approach,  Armonk,  M.E.  Sharpe,  1995,  pp.  197-­‐218.         94  
    • Suberu,  R.T.,  Federalism  and  Ethnic  Conflict  in  Nigeria,  Washington,  United  States   Institute  of  Peace,  2001.      Suberu,  R.T.,  ‘The  Travails  of  Nigerias  Anti-­‐Corruption  Crusade’,  in  R.I.  Rotberg   (ed.)  Corruption,  Global  Security,  and  World  Order,  Washington,  Brookings   Institution  Press,  2009,  pp.  260-­‐282.      Tignor,  R.L.,  ‘Political  Corruption  in  Nigeria  before  Independence’,  Journal  of   Modern  African  Studies,  Vol.  31,  No.  2,  1993,  pp.  175-­‐202.      Ukiwo,  U.,  ‘From  "Pirates"  To  "Militants":  A  Historical  Perspective  on  Anti-­‐State   and  Anti-­‐Oil  Company  Mobilization  Among  the  Ijaw  of  Warri,  Western   Niger  Delta’,  African  Affairs,  Vol.  106,  No.  425,  pp.  587-­‐610.      Umoren,  J.A.,  Democracy  and  Ethnic  Diversity  in  Nigeria,  Lanham,  University   Press  of  America,  1996.      Uwazie,  E.E.,  ‘The  Emergence  of  Political  Terrorism  in  Nigeria’,  in  I.O.  Albert  et  al.   (eds.),  Inter-­‐Ethnic  and  Religious  Conflict  Resolution  in  Nigeria,  Lanham,   Lexington  Books,  1999,  pp.  113-­‐120.      Vaughan,  O.,  Nigerian  Chiefs:  Traditional  Power  in  Modern  Politics,  1890s-­‐1990s,   Rochester,  University  of  Rochester  Press,  2000.      Watts,  M.,  ‘Black  Gold,  White  Heat:  State  Violence,  Local  Resistance  and  the   National  Question  in  Nigeria’,  in  M.  Keith  and  S.  Pile  (eds.)  Geographies  of   Resistance,  London,  Routledge,  1997,  pp.  33-­‐67.      Watts,  M.,  ‘Resource  Curse?  Governmentality,  Oil  and  Power  in  the  Niger  Delta,   Nigeria’,  Geopolitics,  Vol.  9,  No.  1,  2004,  pp.  50-­‐80.        Watts,  M.  J.,  ‘Agriculture  and  Oil-­‐Based  Accumulation:  Stagnation  or   Transformation?’,  in  M.  J.  Watts  (ed.)  State,  Oil,  and  Agriculture  in  Nigeria,     95  
    • Berkeley,  Institute  of  International  Studies,  University  of  California,  1987,   pp.  58-­‐84.      Wheeler,  D.,  ‘Sources  of  Stagnation  in  Sub-­‐Saharan  Africa’,  World  Development,   Vol.  12,  No.  1,  1984,  pp.  1-­‐23.      Wong,  L.,  ‘Asian  National  Oil  Companies  in  Nigeria’,  in  A.  Vines  et  al.  (eds.),  Thirst   for  African  Oil:  Asian  National  Oil  Companies  in  Nigeria  and  Angola,   London,  Chatham  House,  2009,  pp.  8-­‐28.      Yates,  D.A.  The  Rentier  State  in  Africa:  Oil  Rent  Dependency  and  Neocolonialism  in   the  Republic  of  Gabon,  Trenton,  Africa  World  Press,  1996.       96