Persuasive Appeals and Rhetoric
Ethos
• Ethos is appeal based on the character of the
speaker. An ethos-driven document relies on
the reputation of the au...
Logos
• Logos is appeal based on logic or reason.
• Ex: Scholarly documents are also often logos-
driven. They possess sta...
Pathos
• Pathos is appeal based on emotion.
• Ex: Advertisements tend to be pathos-driven.
• (Anyone ever seen the Sarah M...
• Diction – Word Choice (ex: words with
positive or negative connotations)
• Syntax – Sentence Structure (ex: repetition,
...
• Catch interest- How can you grab the reader’s
attention at the outset of the paper?
• Claim- What are you trying to prov...
Persuasive appeals
Persuasive appeals
Persuasive appeals
Persuasive appeals
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Persuasive appeals

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Persuasive appeals

  1. 1. Persuasive Appeals and Rhetoric
  2. 2. Ethos • Ethos is appeal based on the character of the speaker. An ethos-driven document relies on the reputation of the author. • Ex: Advertising with a spokesperson, association with an established or respected group, etc.
  3. 3. Logos • Logos is appeal based on logic or reason. • Ex: Scholarly documents are also often logos- driven. They possess statistics and facts to back up their claims.
  4. 4. Pathos • Pathos is appeal based on emotion. • Ex: Advertisements tend to be pathos-driven. • (Anyone ever seen the Sarah MacLachlan ASPCA commercial?)
  5. 5. • Diction – Word Choice (ex: words with positive or negative connotations) • Syntax – Sentence Structure (ex: repetition, anaphoras) • Images – Figurative language, imagery (metaphors, personification)
  6. 6. • Catch interest- How can you grab the reader’s attention at the outset of the paper? • Claim- What are you trying to prove? What are you arguing for/against? • Convince- What specific evidence do you have to support your claim? • Counterargument- In order to present a good argument, the writer should present the best argument against him/her, then show why it is not sufficient. If the writer does not address the opposing point of view, their argument seems weak. • Conclude- How does the writer reemphasize the effectiveness of his/her claim and evidence?
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