Metaliteracy in beta: A personal view from the South
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Metaliteracy in beta: A personal view from the South

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Presentation on 7 October 2013 - Metaliteracy MOOC

Presentation on 7 October 2013 - Metaliteracy MOOC

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Metaliteracy in beta: A personal view from the South Metaliteracy in beta: A personal view from the South Presentation Transcript

  • Metaliteracy in beta: A personal view from the South By Dr Paul Prinsloo Directorate: Curriculum and Learning Development University of South Africa (Unisa) Twitter profile: @14prinsp
  • Metaliteracy in beta – the storyline… Clarifying my own position Quick recap of metaliteracy In order to read the word, I need to read the world Making sense of some of the discourses of the 21st century world In order to be literate in a networked and (un)flat world I need to know… Metaliteracy in beta – a proposal (In)conclusions
  • Disclaimer • I don’t claim to present a global view, not even a “view from the South, ” or an “African” perspective • My views have been shaped by my location – not only as part of the developing world, but from a continent that is (often) portrayed as a dark, and “failed” continent • Africa, as part of the “global south,” increasingly contests historical descriptions and definitions and exclusions from decisions that (in)directly affect us • My views have been shaped and continue to be shaped by a number of authors and works, such as …
  • Metaliteracy in beta: discourses not information Information is never neutral and always in service of or used to contest dominant discourses. We therefore need to understand information as field with different players, and different agendas, rules, power-relations, inclusion and exclusion
  • Metaliteracy (Mackey & Jacobson, 2011) Image retrieved from retrieved from http://metaliteracy.cdlprojects.com/what.htm Understand format type and delivery mode Evaluate user feedback as active researcher Create a context for user-generated information Evaluate dynamic content critically Produce original content in multiple media formats Understand personal privacy, information ethics and intellectual property issues Share information in participatory environments Mackey, T.P., & Jacobson, T.E. (2011). Reframing information literacy as metaliteracy. College & Research Libraries, 72(1), 62-78.
  • Web 2.0 is a huge information warehouse THE UNIVERSAL LIBRARY Web 2.0 is a jigsaw puzzle of fragmented interconnected pieces THE HYPERTEXTUAL CONNECTION Web 2.0 is a vast souk or market of digital services and products THE GLOBAL MARKET Web 2.0 is a stage for multimodal expression MULTIMEDIA & AUDIOVISUAL COMMUNICATION Web 2.0 is a public space or assembly of human interaction SOCIAL NETWORKS Web 2.0 is an artificial ecosystem for human experience VIRTUAL INTERACTIVE ENVIRONMENTS WEB 2.0 Area, M., & Pessoa, T. (2012). From the solid to the liquid: New literacies for the cultural changes of Web 2.0. Communicar. Scientific Journal of Media Communication. DOI: 10.3916/C38-2011-02-01. http://www.revistacomunicar.com/pdf/preprint/38/En-01-PRE- 12378.pdf From the solid to the liquid: New literacies for the cultural changes of Web 2.0
  • Liquid metaliteracy (Area & Pessoa, 2012; Mackey & Jacobson, 2011) Mackey & Jacobson (2011) Area & Pessoa (2012) Understand format type and delivery mode Instrumental competence: “technical control over each technology and its logical use procedures” Evaluate user feedback as active researcher Cognitive-intellectual competence: “the acquisition of specific cognitive knowledge and skills that enable the subject to search for, select, analyze, interpret and recreate the vast amount of information to which he (sic) has access *to+…” Create a context for user-generated information Evaluate dynamic content critically Socio-communicative competence: “the development of a set of skills related to the creation of various text types… and their dissemination in different languages” Produce original content in multiple media formats Understand personal privacy, information ethics and intellectual property issues Axiological competence: “referring to the awareness that ICT are not aseptic or neutral from the social viewpoint but exert a significant influence on the cultural and political environment of our society…” Share information in participatory environments
  • Critical consciousness as the foundation for metaliteracy as agency Understand format type and delivery mode Evaluate user feedback as active researcher Create a context for user- generated information Evaluate dynamic content critically Produce original content in multiple media formats Understand personal privacy, information ethics and intellectual property issues Share information in participatory environments METALITERACYMETALITERACY
  • “The act of learning to read and write start from a very comprehensive understanding of the act of reading the world, something which humans do before reading the words” (Freire, 1989, p. xvii; emphasis added) “To be illiterate, for Freire, was not only the lack of skills of reading or writing; it was to feel powerless and dependent in a much more general way …” (Burbules & Berk, 1999, p. 52) In order to read the world, I therefore need to be able to map who shapes/shaped my world, the reasons for it, how the shape influences where I am and the choices I have, what the rules of my world are and who benefits from those rules (and my adherence) and how to disrupt and formulate alternative narratives, for myself and for others. Critical consciousness as the foundation for metaliteracy
  • Making sense of the 21st century Our understanding of the scope and function of literacies is influenced by our understanding of the major discourses of the current (and future) age
  • “A global cocktail of intolerable poverty and outrageous wealth, starvation, mass terrorism with nuclear/biological weapons, world war, deliberate pandemics and religious insanity, might plunge humanity into a worldwide pattern of unending hatred and violence – a new Dark Age” (Martin, 2007, p. 32) A new dark age? How does such a view of the world shape my view of the scope, definition and function of literacy?
  • Meta/discourseliteracy Rampant consumerism and rapacious capitalism “From cradle to coffin we are trained and drilled to treat shops as pharmacies filled with drugs to cure or at least mitigate all the illnesses and afflictions in our lives…” (Bauman, 2012, p. 89) • The myth of economic growth • Downward mobility Local and global (dis)connections and contestations Finding local answers to globally produced problems? (Bauman, 1998; Bauman, 2012; Castells, 2009) A networked age Not everyone is included, but everyone is affected… “Networks are created not just to communicate, but also to gain position, to outcommunicate” (Geoff Mulgan in Castells, 2009, p. 26) Personal privacy and state security • Collection and use of personal data • Crusades, jihads and the clash of fundamentalisms • “Ubiquitous mixophobia” (Bauman, 2012, p. 63) – Growth of interdictory spaces & gated communities (Bauman, 2012, p. 68)…. Meta/discourseliteracy
  • Image retrieved from http://www.allstaractivities.com/images/soccer-positions.gif In order to be literate/ a player in the 21st century I need to understand the field, the game, and my position, and my skills • Boundaried site • Players have set/ predetermined positions • Rules are predetermined • Players have different skills • What players can do is determined by their position on the field • The physical condition of the field impacts play
  • Image retrieved from http://envirolaw.com/wp- content/uploads/black-student.jpg CAPITAL: What type of “capital” I have or don’t have • Economic • Cultural • Social • Symbolic HABITUS: Who and how my past shaped/shapes me: • Genetic makeup • Gender • Race • Socio-economic circumstances • Parental background • Geopolitical location • Educational experiences • Health • The choices I made in the past… • My dispositions • Etc. These are durable and transposable (Maton, 2012) In order to be literate in a networked and (un)flat world I need to know… THE FIELD: How does the field in which I find myself in, shape me? What/who shapes the field? Who are the (other) players in the field: • Who are they? • How come they are shapers? • What are the rules? • Who are the referees?
  • Looking at metaliteracy from a field theory (Bourdieu) perspective The “field” is not a benign, pastoral space, but rather le champ – a battle field, where players have set positions, predetermined paces, specific rules which novice players must learn together with basic skills. “What players can do, and where they can go during the game, depends on their field position. The actual physical condition of the field (whether it is wet, dry, well grassed or full of potholes), also has an effect on what players can do and this how the game is played” (Thompson, 2012, p. 66). [(habitus)(capital)] + field = practice/agency (Maton, 2012, p. 50)
  • A field theory perspective on agency My dispositions - how my past and present (and my understanding thereof) shaped and still shape me The capital that I have acquired in the process (or not) The field – the context in which I find myself in. This is not a neutral space, but is, itself, shaped by various structures, and agencies of individuals and collectives My practice/agency and my understanding thereof… We are not “pre-programmed automatons acting out the implications of our upbringings” (Maton, 2012, p. 50).
  • “…where we are in life in any one moment [is+… the result of numberless events in the past that shaped our path” (Maton, 2012, p. 51). Literacy and agency is understanding that the choices we have in any particular moment and time in a specific context, are shaped by the positions we have in that particular social field at that moment in time. Complicating matters is the fact that the context we find ourselves in (at that particular moment in time), has itself been shaped by and is shaped by other contexts, individuals in an evolving power play. Being literate in a networked and (un)flat world it is important to know…
  • HABITUS FIELD CAPITAL Image retrieved from http://metaliteracy.cdlprojects .com/what.htm
  • (In)conclusions 1. We need to understand the emergence of social media in the broader context of political, economic, social, technological, legal and environmental discourses and contestations. 2. It is crucial to understand who produces (and consumes) information, for what purpose, what claims are made, and who/what supports/excludes the producers and claims 3. The production, reproduction, sharing, remixing of information is not a neutral act but flows from and often perpetuates existing discourses 4. The need for critical and self-reflective agency has never been greater, formulating alternative narratives, disrupting normative discourses and asking new questions
  • Thank you. Ke a leboga. Baie dankie Dr Paul Prinsloo Directorate for Curriculum and Learning Development (DCLD) TVW 10-156 P O Box 392 Unisa, 0003, Republic of South Africa Personal blog: http://opendistanceteachingandlearning.wordpress.com Twitter profile: @14prinsp +27 (0) 12 429 3683 (office) +27 (0) 12 429 3551 (fax) +27 (0) 82 3954 113 (mobile)
  • References Area, M., & Pessoa, T. (2012). From the solid to the liquid: New literacies for the cultural changes of Web 2.0. Communicar. Scientific Journal of Media Communication. DOI: 10.3916/C38-2011-02-01. http://www.revistacomunicar.com/pdf/preprint/38/En-01-PRE-12378.pdf Bauman, Z. (1998). Globalization. The human consequences. Cambridge, UK: Polity Press. Bauman, Z. (2012a). On education. Conversations with Riccardo Mazzeo. Cambridge, UK: Polity Press. Bauman, Z. (2012b). Collateral damage. Social inequalities in a global age. Cambridge, UK: Polity Press. Burbules, N.C. & Berk, R. (1999). Critical thinking and critical pedagogy: relations, differences and limits, in Critical theories in education: changing the terrains of knowledge and politics, edited by T.S. Popkewitz & L. Fendler. New York: Routledge, pp. 45—66. Castells, M (2009). Communication power. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. Freire, P. (1973). Pedagogy of the oppressed. Harmondsworth: Penguin. Freire, P. (1989). Learning to question: a pedagogy of liberation. New York: Continuum. Ghemawat, P. (2011). World 3.0. Global prosperity and how to achieve it. Boston: Harvard Business School Publishing. Mackey, T.P., & Jacobson, T.E. (2011). Reframing information literacy as metaliteracy. College & Research Libraries, 72(1), 62-78. Martin, J. (2007). The meaning of the 21st century. A vital blueprint for ensuring our future. London, UK: Transworld Publishers. Maton, K. (2012). Habitus. In Michael Grenfell (Ed.), Pierre Bourdieu. Key concepts. Durham, UK : Acumen Publishing, pp. 48—64. Mayer-Schönberger, V. (2009). Delete. The virtue of forgetting in the digital age. Princeton: Princeton University Press. Thompson, P. (2012). Field. In Michael Grenfell (Ed.), Pierre Bourdieu. Key concepts. Durham, UK : Acumen Publishing, pp. 65—82.