Defining your 1st Release Game
And how do we get there?
What is meant by MVP and MMP?
Before we begin you see…
Answer me these questions three…
A’fore the game you may see…
Hands up as we step through these…...
The product is a village.
We’re going to define and build our product in terms of MVP and MMP over four 25
minute iteratio...
Iteration Planning (5 min)
• Refine stories (example story shortly) & estimate
• Any Acceptance Criteria beyond pieces fit...
ShopkeeperHome
Home
Home
ShopkeeperHome
Example Visions
• Provide a place for people to gather
• Show a beautiful spring day
• Attract photographers
• Provide an ...
Example Epics for 1st Vision
Vision: Provide a place for people to gather
• Create a place for conversation
• Provide cove...
Example Story for 1st Epic
Story: Create a place for conversation
• As a local citizen, set up tables and chairs for my
fr...
Example Story Map
Low
High
Criticality
Usage Sequence
Create a
place for
conversation
Provide
cover from
Weather
Offer foo...
MVP
MVP
MMP
Debrief
Let’s see how this worked out for you…
No one expects the Agile Inquisition!!
• How did that feel?
• Did you choose stories that were too big?
• Did your produc...
Some notes on facilitating this game…
• The puzzle -
– should be large such that it can’t be completed, but not feel insur...
Back-up
What are Story Maps?
Story Mapping
Jeff Patton, 2005,
Better Software Magazine,
“It’s All in How You Slice It”
Low
High
Criticality
Usage Seque...
Story Mapping
Jeff Patton, 2005,
Better Software Magazine,
“It’s All in How You Slice It”
Low
High
Criticality
Usage Seque...
Story Mapping
Jeff Patton, 2005,
Better Software Magazine,
“It’s All in How You Slice It”
Low
High
Criticality
Usage Seque...
Story Mapping
Jeff Patton, 2005,
Better Software Magazine,
“It’s All in How You Slice It”
Low
High
Criticality
Usage Seque...
Now You Have a Story Map
Jeff Patton, 2005,
Better Software Magazine,
“It’s All in How You Slice It”
Low
High
Criticality
...
Definition of Your First Release Game
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Definition of Your First Release Game

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This is the slide deck for the game I created to help people (product owners in particular) experentially understand how a product vision, story map, and stories are used to develop the direction of a product. It was based off of Chris Chapman's #NoEstimates Puzzle Experiment Game. Thanks to him for sharing!

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Definition of Your First Release Game

  1. 1. Defining your 1st Release Game And how do we get there? What is meant by MVP and MMP?
  2. 2. Before we begin you see… Answer me these questions three… A’fore the game you may see… Hands up as we step through these… • I need to understand how to go from a product vision to working with stories in an iteration. • I know what a story map is. • I’m an Agile coach, Scrum master, trainer, etc. looking for a game to help teams understand the first bullet. Apologies to Monty Python…
  3. 3. The product is a village. We’re going to define and build our product in terms of MVP and MMP over four 25 minute iterations • Elect a product owner • Product owner will establish a vision about the village (or puzzle completion) to be done • She or he will then further define the Epics that will help realize this vision (10 min) – Epics = things to build – in the sequence to which they help realize the vision – An example will be given in a moment • Then we’ll conduct release planning for 20 minutes, consisting of 1. working together to brainstorm the stories that will help support these (10 min) – Stories = components of the things to build – Determine when the product owner may accept stories – These Stories will be laid out under each Epic at the criticality level for enabling the Epic – The MVP and MMP will be identified, both on the Story Map and by drawing borders around each one – An example will be given in a moment 2. sorting or otherwise preparing (but not connect) puzzle pieces or themselves • Then we’ll start our iterations: 5 min iteration planning, 15 min development, 2 min iteration review, 3 min retro – Product owner is responsible for ensuring progress towards the vision and quality of story completion Represented by a puzzle…
  4. 4. Iteration Planning (5 min) • Refine stories (example story shortly) & estimate • Any Acceptance Criteria beyond pieces fitting Development (15 min) • Everyone but product owner may build puzzle • Product owner may look at what’s being done Iteration Review (2 min) • Show stories & acceptance criteria • Last responsible moment for product owner to accept Retrospective (3 min) • How can you improve? • Decide on 1-2 actions to try and help
  5. 5. ShopkeeperHome Home Home ShopkeeperHome
  6. 6. Example Visions • Provide a place for people to gather • Show a beautiful spring day • Attract photographers • Provide an enjoyable shopping experience in a small village
  7. 7. Example Epics for 1st Vision Vision: Provide a place for people to gather • Create a place for conversation • Provide cover for inclement weather • Offer food and beverage • Attract people to the area with other businesses • Set it in pleasant scenery
  8. 8. Example Story for 1st Epic Story: Create a place for conversation • As a local citizen, set up tables and chairs for my friends and I to sit in and talk. Possible Acceptance Criteria • minimum # of chairs and tables Possibility that only one table and some set of chairs would be the initial story
  9. 9. Example Story Map Low High Criticality Usage Sequence Create a place for conversation Provide cover from Weather Offer food & beverage Set in pleasant scenery Attract w/ other businesess Build 1 table w/4 chairs Build 2 tables w/6 chairs Build 4 tables w/16 chairs Build enough awning over table Build full awning Entry into the building Show menu Show Restaurant Signage Hanging flowers Have boxed flowers in square Have shop next to restaurant MVPMMP Have many flower boxes in square
  10. 10. MVP
  11. 11. MVP MMP
  12. 12. Debrief Let’s see how this worked out for you…
  13. 13. No one expects the Agile Inquisition!! • How did that feel? • Did you choose stories that were too big? • Did your product owner give you good acceptance criteria? • Did you find yourself in any of your iterations not completing stories? • How involved was your product owner during the “construction” portion of your iteration? • What did you actions did you decide to take in your retro? • Did your estimates help you? Or were they wasteful? How did you make decisions about what you could commit to..? More apologies to Monty Python…
  14. 14. Some notes on facilitating this game… • The puzzle - – should be large such that it can’t be completed, but not feel insurmountable ~500 pieces is good – Have areas that people can envision enabling something as a product vision • Make sure teams adhere to the following: – Timeboxes! – Product owner acceptance (last responsible moment is the Iteration Review) – Product owner is not building the puzzle… • Walk around and ask Qs – Is there clear acceptance criteria? – What infrastructure (sorting pieces) could help you move quicker? – How can your Product Owner help you? – What can you do to ensure you make Iteration goals? • Thanks to Chris R. Chapman of Derailleur Consulting – He developed a very similar game to showcase how estimation can be a wasteful activity – It inspired this game – See http://www.derailleurconsulting.com/blog/the-noestimates-puzzle- experiment
  15. 15. Back-up What are Story Maps?
  16. 16. Story Mapping Jeff Patton, 2005, Better Software Magazine, “It’s All in How You Slice It” Low High Criticality Usage Sequence
  17. 17. Story Mapping Jeff Patton, 2005, Better Software Magazine, “It’s All in How You Slice It” Low High Criticality Usage Sequence EPICS
  18. 18. Story Mapping Jeff Patton, 2005, Better Software Magazine, “It’s All in How You Slice It” Low High Criticality Usage Sequence EPICS FEATURES
  19. 19. Story Mapping Jeff Patton, 2005, Better Software Magazine, “It’s All in How You Slice It” Low High Criticality Usage Sequence
  20. 20. Now You Have a Story Map Jeff Patton, 2005, Better Software Magazine, “It’s All in How You Slice It” Low High Criticality Usage Sequence
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