Lec                           tu                       AFS re                           MIService in the industry isnot a ...
ure Lect I  AFSMAnd this lecture will provide you with insights onhow to design new business models based on bothbusiness ...
Example from the past
Example from present day
Example for the future   >>> pay for services?
Strategy Consultant: 80% corporate/executive + 20% start-up/new business2010   Publishers, broadcasters, retailers       a...
Goal to discover new business model(s) together1. Let’s meet the industry   >>> and your greatest challenges2. Let’s think...
1   The industry    the players, the game
Let’s meet the industry
uire?    What value do we deliver to the customer?                                         What type of relationship doe  ...
What Key Activities do our Value Propositions require?   What value do we deliver to t        Our Distribution Channels?  ...
What Key Resources do our Value Propositions require?Our Distribution Channels? Customer Relationships?Revenue Streams?The...
Who are our Key Partners?                             What Key Activities do our ValWho are our key suppliers?            ...
What are the most important costs inherent in our business model?Which Key Resources are most expensive?Which Key Activiti...
Service in the industry isnot a product featurebut a business modelWrap up left-hand side of the business model1.   Greate...
k  BreaLet’s describe your nightmare competitor
BreakGoal imagine your ultimate competitor1.   Think of a competitor with unlimited resources and working capital     >>> ...
Let’s play
2   Service    the concept
Let’s think services
uire?    What value do we deliver to the customer?                                         What type of relationship doe  ...
What type of relationship does each of our Customer            For whom are we creating valping to solve?                 ...
Through which Channels do our Customer Segments                                           want to be reached?             ...
No.mer           For whom are we creating value?th them?      Who are our most important customers?ness model?            ...
For what value are our customers really willing to pay?For what do they currently pay?How are they currently paying?How wo...
Service in the industry isnot a product featurebut a business modelWrap up right-hand side of the business model1.   Great...
ds  TrenLet’s discuss the impact of trends in your markets
Trends
“The global emerging middle class       now stands at two billion people       who spend USD 6.9 trillion a year,       a ...
“The top ten value creators in the Boston  Consulting Group’s 712-company sample are  all from Asia: five companies listed ...
“The US ranked 24th out of 25 markets around the world in an examination of green consumer habits around the world. Approx...
“Consumers from emerging markets in the Asian region are more willing to pay more for green products. Nearly 95% of Thai c...
“A national survey of 1,800 independent     businesses in the US found that 80%     said public awareness of the value of ...
“Between the year 2010 and 2040, the       global population age 65 and older       is expected to rise from 530 million  ...
“The number of non-employer (single     person) businesses in the US, with an     income greater than USD 1,000 (often    ...
“An average of 78% of consumers in the     US, UK, Canada, Brazil, India and China     say they are willing to co-create w...
“Each year, global consumers make more     than 500 billion online impressions on     one another regarding products and  ...
Service in the industry isnot a product featurebut a business modelService design process1.   Discover     >>> goals, stra...
3   Business    the models
Let’s talk business
Ideas for inspiration
10 New Business Models for this Decade1. Localized Low-Cost Business Model        beta2. One-Off Experience Business Model...
Localized Low-Cost Business Model
The Business Model Canvas                                                                                 Localized Low-Co...
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One-Off Experience Business Model
The Business Model Canvas                                                                One-Off Experience Business Model...
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Beyond Advertising Business Model
4    The Business Model Canvas                                                                         Beyond Advertising ...
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Markets Are Conversations Business Model
The Business Model Canvas Markets Are Conversations Business Model4                                                       ...
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Low-Budget Innovation Business Model
4    The Business Model Canvas                                                                 Low-Budget Innovation Busin...
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Community-Funded Business Model
4    The Business Model Canvas                                                                    Community-Funded Busines...
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Sustainability-Focused Business Model
Service in the Industry is not a Product Feature but a Business Model
Service in the Industry is not a Product Feature but a Business Model
Service in the Industry is not a Product Feature but a Business Model
Service in the Industry is not a Product Feature but a Business Model
Service in the Industry is not a Product Feature but a Business Model
Service in the Industry is not a Product Feature but a Business Model
Service in the Industry is not a Product Feature but a Business Model
Service in the Industry is not a Product Feature but a Business Model
Service in the Industry is not a Product Feature but a Business Model
Service in the Industry is not a Product Feature but a Business Model
Service in the Industry is not a Product Feature but a Business Model
Service in the Industry is not a Product Feature but a Business Model
Service in the Industry is not a Product Feature but a Business Model
Service in the Industry is not a Product Feature but a Business Model
Service in the Industry is not a Product Feature but a Business Model
Service in the Industry is not a Product Feature but a Business Model
Service in the Industry is not a Product Feature but a Business Model
Service in the Industry is not a Product Feature but a Business Model
Service in the Industry is not a Product Feature but a Business Model
Service in the Industry is not a Product Feature but a Business Model
Service in the Industry is not a Product Feature but a Business Model
Service in the Industry is not a Product Feature but a Business Model
Service in the Industry is not a Product Feature but a Business Model
Service in the Industry is not a Product Feature but a Business Model
Service in the Industry is not a Product Feature but a Business Model
Service in the Industry is not a Product Feature but a Business Model
Service in the Industry is not a Product Feature but a Business Model
Service in the Industry is not a Product Feature but a Business Model
Service in the Industry is not a Product Feature but a Business Model
Service in the Industry is not a Product Feature but a Business Model
Service in the Industry is not a Product Feature but a Business Model
Service in the Industry is not a Product Feature but a Business Model
Service in the Industry is not a Product Feature but a Business Model
Service in the Industry is not a Product Feature but a Business Model
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Service in the Industry is not a Product Feature but a Business Model

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working for Strategy Boutique Thaesis and supported by trendwatching.com.

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Service in the Industry is not a Product Feature but a Business Model

  1. 1. Lec tu AFS re MIService in the industry isnot a product featurebut a business model
  2. 2. ure Lect I AFSMAnd this lecture will provide you with insights onhow to design new business models based on bothbusiness logic and creative instinct
  3. 3. Example from the past
  4. 4. Example from present day
  5. 5. Example for the future >>> pay for services?
  6. 6. Strategy Consultant: 80% corporate/executive + 20% start-up/new business2010 Publishers, broadcasters, retailers and technology companies2009 Entertainment, telecom and 7% television production companies 3% 34%2008 Travel and leisure, architecture, fashion and professional services2007 companies2006 Industrial manufacturing, (bio-) technology, science and education,2005 banking and insurance companies2004 Aviation, automotive, engineering 41%2003 and construction companies 14% Retail and FMCG High-tech industry Media and technology Creative industryLet me introduce myself Professional services
  7. 7. Goal to discover new business model(s) together1. Let’s meet the industry >>> and your greatest challenges2. Let’s think services >>> and use your creative instinct3. Let’s talk business >>> and bring in your business logic (finally)2x45 minutes, with breaks and discussion
  8. 8. 1 The industry the players, the game
  9. 9. Let’s meet the industry
  10. 10. uire? What value do we deliver to the customer? What type of relationship doe Which one of our customer’s problems are we helping to solve? Segments expect us to establ What bundles of products and services are we offering to each Customer Segment? Which ones have we establish Which customer needs are we satisfying? How are they integrated with How costly are they? The industry mainly delivers high-technology products and services to businesses Greatest challenge: Customer orientation and service innovationquire? Through which Channels do o
  11. 11. What Key Activities do our Value Propositions require? What value do we deliver to t Our Distribution Channels? Which one of our customer’s pners? Customer Relationships? What bundles of products and Revenue streams? Which customer needs are we Research > Development > Purchasing > Production > Assembly > Distribution > Sales > Maintenance Greatest challenge: Process innovation and automation
  12. 12. What Key Resources do our Value Propositions require?Our Distribution Channels? Customer Relationships?Revenue Streams?The most important assetsin the industry are physical(facilities, machines andsystems) and intellectual(patents)Greatest challenge:Human resources
  13. 13. Who are our Key Partners? What Key Activities do our ValWho are our key suppliers? Our Distribution Channels?Which Key Resources are we acquiring from partners? Customer Relationships?Which Key Activities do partners perform? Revenue streams?The industry works innetworks of suppliers andpartners to reduce risks andacquire access to resourcesGreatest challenge:Managing alliances
  14. 14. What are the most important costs inherent in our business model?Which Key Resources are most expensive?Which Key Activities are most expensive? High proportion fixed costs Greatest challenge: Productivity and cost control
  15. 15. Service in the industry isnot a product featurebut a business modelWrap up left-hand side of the business model1. Greatest challenge for your value proposition >>> customer orientation and service innovation2. Greatest challenge for your key activities >>> process innovation and automation3. Greatest challenge for your key resources >>> human resources4. Greatest challenge for your key partners >>> managing alliances5. Greatest challenge for your cost structure >>> productivity and cost control
  16. 16. k BreaLet’s describe your nightmare competitor
  17. 17. BreakGoal imagine your ultimate competitor1. Think of a competitor with unlimited resources and working capital >>> don’t rely on the past2. This competitor has as many valuable relationships as you have >>> forget any market barriers3. This competitor is operational in business today >>> let go of the status quo4. What would this ultimate competitor look like and how would he act?5. What would you do to deal with this competitor (e.g. prevent/defense/become/...)?5 minutes, individually
  18. 18. Let’s play
  19. 19. 2 Service the concept
  20. 20. Let’s think services
  21. 21. uire? What value do we deliver to the customer? What type of relationship doe Which one of our customer’s problems are we helping to solve? Segments expect us to establ What bundles of products and services are we offering to each Customer Segment? Which ones have we establish Which customer needs are we satisfying? How are they integrated with How costly are they? The industry mainly delivers high-technology products and services to businesses Greatest challenge: Customer orientation and service innovationquire? Through which Channels do o
  22. 22. What type of relationship does each of our Customer For whom are we creating valping to solve? Segments expect us to establish and maintain with them? Who are our most importantering to each Customer Segment? Which ones have we established? How are they integrated with the rest of our business model? How costly are they? It takes a relationship and a social space for a customer to experience a service Greatest challenge: Establish relationships
  23. 23. Through which Channels do our Customer Segments want to be reached? How are we reaching them now? How are our Channels integrated? Which ones work best? Which ones are most cost-efficient? How are we integrating them with customer routines? The industry’s value chain hardly facilitates interaction Greatest challenge: Create multiple touch-pointswhat value are our customers really willing to pay?what do they currently pay? are they currently paying?
  24. 24. No.mer For whom are we creating value?th them? Who are our most important customers?ness model? The industry offers payers products and services, not necessarily solutions to problems experienced by actual end-users Greatest challenge: Value-driven innovation
  25. 25. For what value are our customers really willing to pay?For what do they currently pay?How are they currently paying?How would they prefer to pay?How much does each Revenue Stream contribute to overall revenues? The industry is asset sale driven Greatest challenge: Usage, subscription, licensing models This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Sh To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecom or send a letter to Creative Commons, 171 Second Street, Suite 300, San Fr
  26. 26. Service in the industry isnot a product featurebut a business modelWrap up right-hand side of the business model1. Greatest challenge for your value proposition >>> customer orientation and service innovation2. Greatest challenge for your customer relationships >>> establish relationships3. Greatest challenge for your channels >>> create multiple touch-points4. Greatest challenge for your customer segments >>> value-driven innovation5. Greatest challenge for your revenue streams >>> usage, subscription, licensing models
  27. 27. ds TrenLet’s discuss the impact of trends in your markets
  28. 28. Trends
  29. 29. “The global emerging middle class now stands at two billion people who spend USD 6.9 trillion a year, a figure which is expected to rise to USD 20 trillion - twice current ” US consumption - by 2020. Source: McKinsey, July 2010Let’s illustrate
  30. 30. “The top ten value creators in the Boston Consulting Group’s 712-company sample are all from Asia: five companies listed on stock exchanges in China, two in Hong Kong, and one each in India, Indonesia, and South Korea. ” Source: Boston Consulting Group, September 2010Let’s illustrate
  31. 31. “The US ranked 24th out of 25 markets around the world in an examination of green consumer habits around the world. Approximately two in three Americans perceive green products to be too costly and one-third believes they don’t ” work as well as “regular” products. Source: GfK Roper, October 2010Let’s illustrate
  32. 32. “Consumers from emerging markets in the Asian region are more willing to pay more for green products. Nearly 95% of Thai consumers, 90% of Chinese consumers and over 80% of Malaysian and Korean consumers are willing to pay more, yet less than 60% of consumers from other Asia-Pacific markets such as Hong Kong and Australia exhibit willingness to pay more. ” Source: Datamonitor, December 2010Let’s illustrate
  33. 33. “A national survey of 1,800 independent businesses in the US found that 80% said public awareness of the value of choosing locally owned businesses had ” increased in the last year. Source: ABA, January 2010Let’s illustrate
  34. 34. “Between the year 2010 and 2040, the global population age 65 and older is expected to rise from 530 million ” to 1.3 billion. Source: US Census Bureau, March 2010Let’s illustrate
  35. 35. “The number of non-employer (single person) businesses in the US, with an income greater than USD 1,000 (often secondary sources of income) increased by 40.5% in the ten years from 1997 to ” 2007. Source: US Census Bureau, June 2010Let’s illustrate
  36. 36. “An average of 78% of consumers in the US, UK, Canada, Brazil, India and China say they are willing to co-create with ” brands. Source: IBM, January 2010Let’s illustrate
  37. 37. “Each year, global consumers make more than 500 billion online impressions on one another regarding products and ” services. Source: Forrester, September 2010Let’s illustrate
  38. 38. Service in the industry isnot a product featurebut a business modelService design process1. Discover >>> goals, strategy, context and customer journey2. Conceptualize >>> experiences from end-users to personnel3. Design >>> touchpoints, service system, look-and-feel4. Build >>> platform, physical locations, media, training5. Deliver >>> organise, communicate, evaluate
  39. 39. 3 Business the models
  40. 40. Let’s talk business
  41. 41. Ideas for inspiration
  42. 42. 10 New Business Models for this Decade1. Localized Low-Cost Business Model beta2. One-Off Experience Business Model beta3. Beyond Advertising Business Model beta4. Markets Are Conversations Business Model beta5. Low-Budget Innovation Business Model beta6. Community-Funded Business Model beta7. Sustainability-Focused Business Model beta8. Twisted Freemium Business Model beta9. Unlimited Niches Business Model beta10. In-Crowd Customers Business Model beta
  43. 43. Localized Low-Cost Business Model
  44. 44. The Business Model Canvas Localized Low-Cost Business Model4 Day Month Year No. Key Key Value Customer Customer Partners Activities Proposition Relationships Segments Who are our Key Partners? What Key Activities do our Value Propositions require? What value do we deliver to the customer? What type of relationship does each of our Customer For whom are we creating value? Independent Who are our key suppliers? Which Key Resources are we acquiring from partners? Our Distribution Channels? Customer Relationships? Simple, small Which one of our customer’s problems are we helping to solve? What bundles of products and services are we offering to each Customer Segment? Segments expect us to establish and maintain with them? Which ones have we established? Higher incomes Who are our most important customers? Which Key Activities do partners perform? Revenue streams? Cost efficient Which customer needs are we satisfying? How are they integrated with the rest of our business model? product/service and cheap How costly are they? in emerging procurement designers product/service markets Lower customer expectations Standardized Marketing Lower-incomes Minimum local micro and quality in emerging specifications producers management markets KeyResources do ourCustomer Relationships? What Key Our Distribution Channels? Value Propositions require? Income Channelsour Customer Segments Through which Channels do want to be reached? Metropolitan Resources Revenue Streams? generating/self- How are we reaching them now? How are our Channels integrated? areas in Which ones work best? sustaining Which ones are most cost-efficient? How are we integrating them with customer routines? mature markets Energy efficient Brands distribution via local vendors Other areas in mature markets Cost Revenue Structure costs inherent in our business model? What are the most important Which Key Resources are most expensive? Streams pay? really willing to pay? For what value are our customers For what do they currently Which Key Activities are most expensive? How are they currently paying? How would they prefer to pay? Micro financed How much does each Revenue Stream contribute to overall revenues? Low prices x Low costs local banks/ High volumes foundations Designer: Ouke Arts (ouke.arts@gmail.com) This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ or send a letter to Creative Commons, 171 Second Street, Suite 300, San Francisco, California, 94105, USA.
  45. 45. le mpExa
  46. 46. Exa mp le
  47. 47. le xa mpE
  48. 48. One-Off Experience Business Model
  49. 49. The Business Model Canvas One-Off Experience Business Model4 Day Month Year No. Key Key Value Customer Customer Partners Activities Proposition Relationships Segments Who are our Key Partners? What Key Activities do our Value Propositions require? What value do we deliver to the customer? What type of relationship does each of our Customer For whom are we creating value? Who are our key suppliers? Which Key Resources are we acquiring from partners? Our Distribution Channels? Customer Relationships? 3rd party Which one of our customer’s problems are we helping to solve? What bundles of products and services are we offering to each Customer Segment? Segments expect us to establish and maintain with them? Which ones have we established? Customers in Who are our most important customers? Which Key Activities do partners perform? Offline event Revenue streams? Software Which customer needs are we satisfying? Instant How are they integrated with the rest of our business model? see-hear-buy How costly are they? markets of organizers development consuming product/service abundance Conversation Experience Offline pop-up One-off Instant engagement seeking commerce experiences contributing and initiative customers KeyResources do ourCustomer Relationships? What Key Our Distribution Channels? Value Propositions require? Channelsour Customer Segments Through which Channels do want to be reached? Online retailers Resources Revenue Streams? How are we reaching them now? How are our Channels integrated? Which ones work best? Which ones are most cost-efficient? How are we integrating them with customer routines? Software Online platform channels Cost Revenue Structure costs inherent in our business model? What are the most important Which Key Resources are most expensive? Streams pay? really willing to pay? For what value are our customers For what do they currently Which Key Activities are most expensive? How are they currently paying? How would they prefer to pay? Online Commissions How much does each Revenue Stream contribute to overall revenues? Commissions Hosting costs presence and pop-up instant online findability costs commerce retail Designer: Ouke Arts (ouke.arts@gmail.com) This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ or send a letter to Creative Commons, 171 Second Street, Suite 300, San Francisco, California, 94105, USA.
  50. 50. le xa mpE
  51. 51. Exa mp le
  52. 52. le xa mpE
  53. 53. Beyond Advertising Business Model
  54. 54. 4 The Business Model Canvas Beyond Advertising Business Model Day Month Year No. Key Key Value Customer Customer Partners Activities Proposition Relationships Segments Who are our Key Partners? What Key Activities do our Value Propositions require? What value do we deliver to the customer? What type of relationship does each of our Customer For whom are we creating value? Who are our key suppliers? Our Distribution Channels? Which one of our customer’s problems are we helping to solve? Segments expect us to establish and maintain with them? Who are our most important customers? Which Key Resources are we acquiring from partners? Facilitate Customer Relationships? Trusted What bundles of products and services are we offering to each Customer Segment? Research, Which ones have we established? Customers in Commercial Which Key Activities do partners perform? Revenue streams? Which customer needs are we satisfying? How are they integrated with the rest of our business model? How costly are they? sharing and product/service compare, mature partners contributing advice review markets Public Facilitate On-demand Individuals partners interacting interaction KeyResources do ourCustomer Relationships? What Key Our Distribution Channels? Value Propositions require? Channelsour Customer Segments Through which Channels do want to be reached? Customers in Review portals Resources Revenue Streams? How are we reaching them now? How are our Channels integrated? emerging Which ones work best? Which ones are most cost-efficient? How are we integrating them with customer routines? markets Facilitation Online skills channels Cost Revenue Structure costs inherent in our business model? What are the most important Which Key Resources are most expensive? Streams pay? really willing to pay? For what value are our customers For what do they currently Which Key Activities are most expensive? How are they currently paying? How would they prefer to pay? How much does each Revenue Stream contribute to overall revenues? Content Online Facilitators management findability Facilitation fees Commissions costs costs Designer: Ouke Arts (ouke.arts@gmail.com) This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ or send a letter to Creative Commons, 171 Second Street, Suite 300, San Francisco, California, 94105, USA.
  55. 55. Exa mp le
  56. 56. le xa mpE
  57. 57. Exa mp le
  58. 58. Markets Are Conversations Business Model
  59. 59. The Business Model Canvas Markets Are Conversations Business Model4 Day Month Year No. Key Key Value Customer Customer Partners Activities Proposition Relationships Segments Who are our Key Partners? What Key Activities do our Value Propositions require? What value do we deliver to the customer? What type of relationship does each of our Customer For whom are we creating value? Who are our key suppliers? Our Distribution Channels? Which one of our customer’s problems are we helping to solve? Segments expect us to establish and maintain with them? Who are our most important customers? Which Key Resources are we acquiring from partners? Real-time Customer Relationships? Modular and What bundles of products and services are we offering to each Customer Segment? Find, follow, Which ones have we established? Media Which Key Activities do partners perform? Revenue streams? Which customer needs are we satisfying? How are they integrated with the rest of our business model? How costly are they? Engaged tracking and beta products/ interact and companies customers conversing services collaborate Product/service Non-engaged improvement customers and innovation KeyResources do ourCustomer Relationships? What Key Our Distribution Channels? Value Propositions require? Channelsour Customer Segments Through which Channels do want to be reached? Resources Revenue Streams? How are we reaching them now? How are our Channels integrated? Which ones work best? Which ones are most cost-efficient? How are we integrating them with customer routines? Social media Online social skilled networks employees Cost Revenue Structure costs inherent in our business model? What are the most important Which Key Resources are most expensive? Streams pay? really willing to pay? For what value are our customers For what do they currently Which Key Activities are most expensive? How are they currently paying? How would they prefer to pay? Lower product/ How much does each Revenue Stream contribute to overall revenues?Higher service failure recurrent costs revenues Designer: Ouke Arts (ouke.arts@gmail.com) This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ or send a letter to Creative Commons, 171 Second Street, Suite 300, San Francisco, California, 94105, USA.
  60. 60. le xa mpE
  61. 61. Exa mp le
  62. 62. le xa mpE
  63. 63. Low-Budget Innovation Business Model
  64. 64. 4 The Business Model Canvas Low-Budget Innovation Business Model Day Month Year No. Key Key Value Customer Customer Partners Activities Proposition Relationships Segments Who are our Key Partners? What Key Activities do our Value Propositions require? What value do we deliver to the customer? What type of relationship does each of our Customer For whom are we creating value? Who are our key suppliers? Our Distribution Channels? Which one of our customer’s problems are we helping to solve? Segments expect us to establish and maintain with them? Who are our most important customers? Which Key Resources are we acquiring from partners? Customer Relationships? What bundles of products and services are we offering to each Customer Segment? Free / Which ones have we established? Local customer Which Key Activities do partners perform? Revenue streams? Customer Co-created Which customer needs are we satisfying? How are they integrated with the rest of our business model? How costly are they? personalized Early adopters communities observation products samples Global trend Customer Followers trackers participation KeyResources do ourCustomer Relationships? What Key Our Distribution Channels? Value Propositions require? Channelsour Customer Segments Through which Channels do want to be reached? Resources Revenue Streams? How are we reaching them now? How are our Channels integrated? Which ones work best? Which ones are most cost-efficient? How are we integrating them with customer routines? Customer Offline Online behavior development channels intelligence labs Cost Revenue Structure costs inherent in our business model? What are the most important Which Key Resources are most expensive? Streams pay? really willing to pay? For what value are our customers For what do they currently Which Key Activities are most expensive? How are they currently paying? How would they prefer to pay? How much does each Revenue Stream contribute to overall revenues? Lower product Higher new development product costs success rate Designer: Ouke Arts (ouke.arts@gmail.com) This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ or send a letter to Creative Commons, 171 Second Street, Suite 300, San Francisco, California, 94105, USA.
  65. 65. le xa mpE
  66. 66. Exa mp le
  67. 67. le xa mpE
  68. 68. Community-Funded Business Model
  69. 69. 4 The Business Model Canvas Community-Funded Business Model Day Month Year No. Key Key Value Customer Customer Partners Activities Proposition Relationships Segments Who are our Key Partners? What Key Activities do our Value Propositions require? What value do we deliver to the customer? What type of relationship does each of our Customer For whom are we creating value? Who are our key suppliers? Our Distribution Channels? Which one of our customer’s problems are we helping to solve? Segments expect us to establish and maintain with them? Who are our most important customers? Which Key Resources are we acquiring from partners? Customer Relationships? Community- What bundles of products and services are we offering to each Customer Segment? Which ones have we established? Media Which Key Activities do partners perform? Revenue streams? Fund Which customer needs are we satisfying? Community How are they integrated with the rest of our business model? How costly are they? funded Believers companies management membership products Community Producers Suppliers management KeyResources do ourCustomer Relationships? What Key Our Distribution Channels? Value Propositions require? Channelsour Customer Segments Through which Channels do want to be reached? Resources Revenue Streams? How are we reaching them now? Buyers Distributors How are our Channels integrated? Which ones work best? Which ones are most cost-efficient? How are we integrating them with customer routines? Online Community community Retail stores intelligence platform Cost Revenue Structure costs inherent in our business model? What are the most important Which Key Resources are most expensive? Streams pay? really willing to pay? For what value are our customers For what do they currently Which Key Activities are most expensive? How are they currently paying? How would they prefer to pay? How much does each Revenue Stream contribute to overall revenues? Marketing Production Distribution Supplier Product sales Interest costs costs costs subscriptions Designer: Ouke Arts (ouke.arts@gmail.com) This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ or send a letter to Creative Commons, 171 Second Street, Suite 300, San Francisco, California, 94105, USA.
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  73. 73. Sustainability-Focused Business Model
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