Strategic design tools - patterns, frameworks and principles
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Strategic design tools - patterns, frameworks and principles

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Presented at UX Scotland June 2013. ...

Presented at UX Scotland June 2013.
"This talk covers how to create a strategic vision for a product / service, and then take that vision though a series of strategic design tools to guide its journey though production to release.

We will cover:

What strategic design is and why its important
How to create design principals for a project which can be used to aid feature ideas, prioritisation and design
Working with stakeholders to translate solutions back into requirements
Frameworks for collaborative design"

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    Strategic design tools - patterns, frameworks and principles Strategic design tools - patterns, frameworks and principles Document Transcript

    • STRATEGICDESIGN TOOLSPatterns, Frameworks & PrinciplesOli Shaw | @olishaw | www.olishaw.comJune2013UXScotland1Monday, 24 June 13
    • Product and serviceinnovation companywww.fluxx.uk.com+Experience &Brand Strategistwww.olishaw.com2Monday, 24 June 13I  work  at  fluxx,  as  a  strategic  designer,  we  are  a  product  an  service  innova6on  company.  “Fluxx  is  an  innova6on  company,  crea6ng  new  products  and  services  to  drive  growth  for  established  brands.  We  encourage  large  companies  to  behave  like  start-­‐ups,  introducing  our  unique  blend  of  business  rigour  and  crea6ve  enterprise  to  see  big  thinking  brought  to  life.”
    • It’s not a very sexy title for a talk, is it?STRATEGICDESIGNPatterns, Frameworks& Principles3Monday, 24 June 13
    • Maybe I should have called it:PROBES,COAXING &MANIPULATION4Monday, 24 June 13
    • What isstrategic design?5Monday, 24 June 13
    • “Strategic design is aboutapplying some of theprinciples of traditional designto ‘big picture’ [challenges]...It redefines how problemsare approached, identifiesopportunities for action”WHAT IS STRATEGIC DESIGN?~ Helsinki Design Lab6Monday, 24 June 13
    • “This is only possible when designis integrated into the DNA oforganisations, creating newopportunities for designers with astrategic aptitude to migrate fromstudios and ateliers to integratedpositions, embedded withinorganisations and governments.”WHAT IS STRATEGIC DESIGN?~ Helsinki Design Lab7Monday, 24 June 13
    • DESIGNHASMOREVALUETOOFFER8Monday, 24 June 13Design  has  more  value  to  offer  then..  then  just  making  things  preGy  and  feel  nice
    • DESIGNINGTHESOLUTION9Monday, 24 June 13Designers  are  typically  used  to  start  by  finding  the  answer  to  the  ques6on;  ‘what  is  the  solu6on?’
    • Jurassic Parkhttp://youtu.be/qIXk3mNkGy410Monday, 24 June 13John  Hammond:  I  dont  think  youre  giving  us  our  due  credit.  Our  scien6sts  have  done  things  which  nobodys  ever  done  before...Dr.  Ian  Malcolm:  Yeah,  yeah,  but  your  scien6sts  were  so  preoccupied  with  whether  or  not  they  could  that  they  didnt  stop  to  think  if  they  should.
    • How do we solve this?Should we be doing this?Why are we doing this..?11Monday, 24 June 13Rather  then  geQng  excited  and  rushing  into  ‘how  do  we  solve  this’,  we  should  always  want  to  make  sure  to  make  sure  ‘should  we  be  doing  this’  and  what  is  the  commercial  reason  we  are  doing  this.When  mentoring  one  of  the  most  common  things  I  see  is  people  jus6ng  straight  into  wireframing,  worse  s6ll  is  when  they  jumping  straight  in  to  wireframing  in  soRware.  This  isn’t  leaving  6me  for  thinking  about  the  purpose,  its  straight  into  the  experience.
    • DEFININGTHEPROBLEM12Monday, 24 June 13I’ve  always  been  more  interested  in  defining  the  problem,  because  defining  the  problem  is  as  if  not  more  important  then  designing  the  solu6on.
    • DEFININGTHE RIGHTPROBLEM13Monday, 24 June 13Because  you  need  to  make  sure  its  the  RIGHT  problem  your  trying  to  solve.
    • PURPOSE +EXPERIENCE= IMPACT14Monday, 24 June 13In  the  world  of  branding  you  have  purpose,  experience  and  impact.For  designers  you  can  create  the  greatest  experience  but  it  the  purpose  is  not  right,  its  not  worth  anything  and  more  importantly  it  wont  have  the  impact  the  business  wants  or  needs.
    • STRATEGICDESIGN15Monday, 24 June 13I’m  going  to  talk  about  strategic  design,  with  the  goal  of  trying  to  get  the  right  balance  of  theory  and  things  that  you  can  take  away  with  and  use  in  your  work.
    • Where aredesign decisionsbeing made?16Monday, 24 June 13Before  we  begin,  I  want  you  to  consider  this...Design  decisions  are  made  without  some  people  realising  that  they  are  making  design  decisions  or  that  they  are  effec6ng  the  design  decisions  that  can  be  made.
    • Where are design decisions being made?Developers &Engineers17Monday, 24 June 13Developers  /  Engineers:  The  choices  they  make  in  the  development  process  effects  the  final  product  which  are  design  decisions  (e.g.  transi6on  /  anima6on  speeds)
    • Where are design decisions being made?Developers &EngineersProduct Owner/ Manager18Monday, 24 June 13Product  owners:  By  Choosing  the  priority  of  features  etc.
    • Where are design decisions being made?Developers &EngineersProduct Owner/ ManagerBusiness& Finance19Monday, 24 June 13Business  &  Finance:  By  the  amount  of  budget  and  resources  they  assign  to  a  project,  or  by  seQng  the  business  objec6ves  and  the  measurements  of  success.
    • Where are design decisions being made?Developers &EngineersProduct Owner/ ManagerBusiness& FinancePolicy makers& Legal20Monday, 24 June 13As  you  move  up  the  chain  there  are  increasingly  more  things  which  shape  the  design  decisions  being  made,  the  laws  and  policies  which  might  need  to  be  challenged  or  changed  for  the  right  design  to  happen.
    • THIS TALK COVERS:1. Defining the right problem2. Importance of a vision3. Design principles4. Synthesis & Perspective5. Frameworks & Templates6. Better innovation through collaboration21Monday, 24 June 13
    • 1. Defining the right problem2. Importance of a vision3. Design principles4. Synthesis & Perspective5. Frameworks & Templates6. Better innovation through collaboration22Monday, 24 June 13
    • PROBLEMS AREN’TCLEAN AND CLEARSquiggle By Damien Newman23Monday, 24 June 13Problems  aren’t  clean  and  clear,  they  are  messy.
    • Donald Rumsfeldhttp://youtu.be/NfNnnoXBd4024Monday, 24 June 13‘There  are  known  knowns,  there  are  known  unknowns  and  there  are  the  unknown  unknowns...’
    • DARKMATTER~ Dan Hill25Monday, 24 June 13This  is  what  Dan  Hill  talks  about  as  the  dark  maGer  of  projects...if  you  havent  read  what  he  has  said  you  should  make  a  point  of  going  and  reading  it.
    • “The answer to unlockinga new experience,product or service issometimes buried deepwithin organisationalculture, regulatory orpolicy environment.”~ Dan Hill26Monday, 24 June 13The  design  you  will  produce  is  shaped  by  these  invisible,  intangible  forces,  which  shape  the  end  results  as  much  as  the  choice  of  type  or  colour  pallet.
    • Sid Meiers Civilizationhttp://youtu.be/U3up2VzedTM27Monday, 24 June 13In  the  beginning  a  new  design  project  if  feels  a  lot  like  playing  civilisa6on  to  me,  its  a  dark  map,  you  dont  have  much  to  go  on,  but  you  explore,  you  make  discoveries,  you  create,  you  make  allies  and  such.
    • Solutions!=Requirements(or assumptions)28Monday, 24 June 13I  want  to  be  given  a  problem  to  understand,  define  and  solve.  Not  a  solu6on  to  design  and  implement.When  you  are  given  a  solu6on  as  a  star6ng  point  there  is  liGle  scope  for  innova6on  to  happen,  worse  s6ll  there  is  a  greater  poten6al  for  the  project  to  go  in  the  wrong  direc6on.
    • What are thebusiness objective?29Monday, 24 June 13A  simple  technique  for  ‘transla6ng  back’  a  solu6on  you  have  been  given  to  implement  in  to  a  requirement,  is  to  find  out  “what  the  business  objec6ve  is  that  this  solu6on  needs  to  address?”If  a  project  or  feature  is  NOT  linked  to  a  business  objec6ve,  why  are  you  doing  it?This  creates  the  opportunity  for  the  designer  to...concept  beGer,  add  more  value  and  to  well  design,  not  just  implement.
    • HypothesesbeatRequirementswhich beatsSolutionsany day of the week30Monday, 24 June 13A  hypothesis  or  and  assump6on  which  you  can  work  from,  allows  for  more  scope  and  opportunity  then  a  fixed  requirement.  But  both  a  hypothesis  and  a  requirement  as  far  beGer  then  being  given  a  solu6on  to  implement.
    • START WITH AHYPOTHESISES31Monday, 24 June 13How  can  you  add  value  if  your  just  puQng  the  lips6ck  on?
    • 1. Defining the right problem2. Importance of a vision3. Design principles4. Synthesis & Perspective5. Frameworks & Templates6. Better innovation through collaboration32Monday, 24 June 13
    • Thundercatshttp://youtu.be/0-0hNQTmZ0Q33Monday, 24 June 13Lion-­‐o  lord  of  the  Thundercats  has  a  the  sword  of  omens  to  guide  him  the  right  direc6on...
    • THEIMPORTANCEOF A VISION34Monday, 24 June 13Sight  beyond  sight...I  oRen  talk  a  lot  about  the  the  importance  of  a  vision  as  something  to  aim  towards.  You  need  to  know  where  you  are  heading  before  you  set  out  upon  a  journey,  rather  then  focusing  on  your  method  of  geQng  somewhere.
    • calgary.caHAVE SOMETHING VISIBLETO AIM FOR35Monday, 24 June 13There  are  many  routes,  obstacles  and  unforeseen  events  on  the  way  to  your  goal,  but  you  need  something  to  keep  aiming  for  as  you  navigate  the  course  of  a  project.
    • What are we delivering on?CREATE SOMETHINGVISIBLE TO AIM FOR36Monday, 24 June 13So  what  do  you  need  to  consider  when  crea6ng  your  vision  to  aim  for?1.  What  are  we  delivering  on?  What  is  the  brand  value  or  business  objec>ve  we  are  linking  this  to?
    • What are we delivering on?How far forward are we looking?CREATE SOMETHINGVISIBLE TO AIM FOR37Monday, 24 June 13As  its  a  vision  it  should  be  a  blend  of  a?ainable  but  also  beyond  reach  (so  it  is  something  to  aim  for)
    • What are we delivering on?How far forward are we looking?Make it a collaborative exerciseCREATE SOMETHINGVISIBLE TO AIM FOR38Monday, 24 June 13It  should  be  a  collabora6ve  exercise  in  crea6ng  it,  with  key  representa6ves  /  stakeholders  involved.  This  should  create  buy  in  with  the  right  people  at  the  right  level.
    • What are we delivering on?How far forward are we looking?Make it a collaborative exerciseShare it with everyoneCREATE SOMETHINGVISIBLE TO AIM FOR39Monday, 24 June 13It  must  be  share  with  everyone  in  the  organisa6on,  communicate  it,  so  that  it  becomes  a  share  vision  everyone  is  working  towards.
    • VALUE PROPOSITIONby Stephan Liozu40Monday, 24 June 13And  now  for  some  examples  of  exercises  for  finding  and  shaping  the  vision.First,  the  value  proposi6on  elevator  pitch  by  Stephan  Liozu,  it  concisely  combines  all  of  the  key  aspects  needed  to  start  crea6ng  a  vision.hGp://thebuildnetwork.com/innova6on/value-­‐proposi6on-­‐statement/
    • OBITUARYby Bill Taylor41Monday, 24 June 13The  Obituary  by  Bill  Taylor  “take  6me  (probably  much  longer  than  twenty  minutes)  and  write  their  organiza6ons  obituary.  What  legacy  did  your  company  leave  in  its  industry?  What  contribu6ons  did  your  business  unit  make  to  your  company?  How  did  your  brand  move  the  needle  in  a  market  category?  To  clarify  your  companys  future,  it  helps  to  step  back  and  imagine  a  world  in  which  it  does  not  exist.”hGp://blogs.hbr.org/taylor/2012/05/your_companys_obituary_can_shape_its_future.html
    • TECHCRUNCH REVIEW42Monday, 24 June 13Or  if  that  is  too  morbid,  you  can  work  it  the  other  way  round.  If  you  launch  tomorrow  (with  everything  finished  perfectly)  what  would  the  TechCrunch  (or  alike)  review  of  your  product  be?  What  aspects  would  they  praise,  what  would  they  compare  you  to?
    • AMAZON REVIEWS43Monday, 24 June 13Or  to  make  it  more  audience  focused  (if  you  have  personas  at  the  stage),  you  could  create  Amazon  customer  reviews  of  your  product.
    • Sugru.com44Monday, 24 June 13Another  method  is  to  craR  a  manifesto  as  something  to  aim  for,  a  good  manifesto  is  rooted  in  disrup6on,  it  needs  to  inspire  and  rally  people  together  towards  a  unified  objec6ve.
    • MISSION STATEMENTTO A TWEETPraesent non nisiquis maurisconvallis aliquet.Curabitur acbibendum lacus, neccongue lorem. Doneceget cursus odio.Maecenas luctusfelis luctussagittis vulputate.Suspendisse egetnunc vitae odioaliquet ornare.Mauris in semperneque, etPraesent non nisiquis maurisconvallis aliquet.Curabitur acbibendum lacus, neccongue lorem. Doneceget cursus odio.Praesent non nisiquis mauris convaMission statement Elevator pitchTweet@olishaw www.olishaw.com45Monday, 24 June 13An  exercise  I  have  been  refining  in  my  work  is  the  mission  statement  to  a  tweet.Have  (all  the  right  people)  in  a  workshop,  get  them  to  individually  write  a  mission  statement  for  the  company  /  product.  Then  they  each  take  turns  in  reading  it  out,  discuss  the  differences.  Then  they  rewrite  the  mission  statement  but  much  more  condensed,  like  an  elevator  pitch,  again  read  out  and  discuss,  but  this  6me  they  should  all  be  more  aligned.  Finally  get  them  to  once  again  write  it,  but  this  6me  they  have  to  put  it  into  a  tweet,  and  one  last  6me  read  out  and  discuss.By  the  end  of  the  process  they  should  all  be  aligned,  and  you  should  have  a  clear  idea  of  the  key  objec6ves  and  differen6ators.
    • ASTARTINGPOINT46Monday, 24 June 13These  exercises  are  just  the  beginning,  you  shouldn’t  expect  to  get  a  finished  polished  vision  out  of  these  workshops  and  exercises.  But  you  should  have  successfully  begun  to  align  the  key  stakeholders  towards  the  same  vision.  The  vision  will  need  some  further  craRing  and  polishing  before  you  can  communicate  it  with  everyone  else  in  the  organisa6on.
    • COAXING OUTTHE SOFTER REQUIREMENTS47Monday, 24 June 13In  the  process  of  crea6ng  the  vision  and  working  through  these  exercises,  it  will  oRen  help  you  tease  out  some  of  the  soRer  requirements  and  less  explicit  goals  for  the  project/organisa6on.
    • 1. Defining the right problem2. Importance of a vision3. Design principles4. Synthesis & Perspective5. Frameworks & Templates6. Better innovation through collaboration48Monday, 24 June 13If  your  not  familiar  with  what  design  principles  do  and  why  are  they  important...  good  design  principles  should  measure  up  to  these  points:
    • DESIGN PRINCIPLESThey describe the characteristic of aproduct.49Monday, 24 June 13The  characteris6cs  and  the  personality...
    • DESIGN PRINCIPLESThey describe the characteristic of aproduct.They are used to communicate to a widevariety of people.50Monday, 24 June 13They  must  be  in  a  language  which  can  be  understood  by  a  wide  variety  of  people.  This  is  so  that  they  can  be  agreed  with,  supported  by  and  championed  by  others  within  the  organisa6on.
    • DESIGN PRINCIPLESThey describe the characteristic of aproduct.They are used to communicate to a widevariety of people.They are experience goals for theproduct.51Monday, 24 June 13They  are  goals  which  the  product  experience  needs  to  achieve
    • DESIGN PRINCIPLESThey describe the characteristic of aproduct.They are used to communicate to a widevariety of people.They are experience goals for theproduct.They help guide us towards our vision.52Monday, 24 June 13They  should  help  navigate  the  project  to  reach  the  desired  vision,  keeping  it  true.
    • DESIGN PRINCIPLESThey describe the characteristic of aproduct.They are used to communicate to a widevariety of people.They are experience goals for theproduct.They help guide us towards our vision.They can be used to aid decision makingin a project.53Monday, 24 June 13Lastly  but  most  importantly,  having  a  set  of  design  principles  are  invaluable  when    you  trying  to  make  a  decision  about  a,b  or  c  (aside  from  prototypes  and  user  tes6ng).  The  are  even  more  helpful  when  you  have  a  senior  stakeholder  coming  along  and  doing  a  “swoop  n  poop”    in  your  mee6ng.
    • “We created aspreadsheet of designprinciples thatcompanies shared:Google, Apple, UK.gov,etc. Then we took thestrongest principles”~ Anonymous 201354Monday, 24 June 13I  recently  read  this  on  a  forum  discussing  how  to  create  design  principles.
    • WHAT’S RIGHT FOR YOURBRAND / PRODUCT55Monday, 24 June 13The  principles  for  Google  won’t  be  right  for  Morrisons,  who’s  principles  wont  be  right  for  Louis  VuiGon.The  principals  you  are  using  to  govern  and  steer  your  products  decisions  should  be  grounded  in  what  is  important  to  your  product,  your  brands  values,  your  business  objec>ves,  linked  to  research  or  your  audience  goals.
    • Universal: our design needs towork for everyone, everyculture, every language, everydevice, every stage of life.Human: our voice and visualstyle stay in the background,behind people’s voices, people’sfaces, and people’s expression.Clean: our visual style is cleanand understated.Consistent: reduce, reuse, don’tredesign.Useful: meant for repeated dailyuseFast: faster experiences aremore efficient and feel moreeffortless.Transparent: we are clear andup front about what’s happeningand why.56Monday, 24 June 13Your  principles  shouldn’t  be  too  abstract  or  too  generic.What  design  shouldn’t  be  useful?  The  goals  facebook’s  principles  are  looking  to  achieve  are  good  but  the  way  they  are  communicated  is  too  general.  
    • PRINCIPLES TEMPLATEPrinciple (statement)Description / detailsExamples of use57Monday, 24 June 13A  design  principal  should  consist  of:  A  statement,  a  descrip6on  and  where  possible  an  example  (this  can  be  added  later).It  should  be  noted  that  the  principle  /  statement  should  be  strong  and  clear  enough  on  its  own,  without  the  descrip6on  /  details.
    • 58Monday, 24 June 13It  goes  without  saying  that  your  design  principles  should  be  considered,  and  as  such  they  shouldn’t  be  an  epic  list.  Too  many  principles  will  encourage  people  to  use  them  lest,  the  wont  be  as  memorable.  
    • GOV.UK PRINCIPLES59Monday, 24 June 13The  Gov.UK  principles  are  a  shining  example  of  a  good  set  of  design  principles,  if  you  haven’t  seen  them  make  sure  you  go  an  read  them.
    • TEST YOUR PRINCIPLES~ Jared M. Spool 201160Monday, 24 June 13Jared  M.  Spool  gave  these  checks  to  test  the  principles  you  have  created
    • TEST YOUR PRINCIPLES1. Does It Come Directly From Research?~ Jared M. Spool 201161Monday, 24 June 13I  would  update  this  test  to  include  that  it  should  be  linked  to  at  least  one  of;  your  brands  values,  your  business  objec6ves,  your  audience  goals  or  research.
    • TEST YOUR PRINCIPLES1. Does It Come Directly From Research?2. Does It Help You Say No Most Of The Time?~ Jared M. Spool 201162Monday, 24 June 13The  principle  should  be  a  guide  and  a  support  when  making  decisions  or  decisions  are  being  made  without  you.
    • TEST YOUR PRINCIPLES1. Does It Come Directly From Research?2. Does It Help You Say No Most Of The Time?3. Does It Distinguish Your Design From YourCompetitors?~ Jared M. Spool 201163Monday, 24 June 13(see  facebook’s  ‘useful  and  clean’)
    • TEST YOUR PRINCIPLES1. Does It Come Directly From Research?2. Does It Help You Say No Most Of The Time?3. Does It Distinguish Your Design From YourCompetitors?4. Is it Something You Might Reverse In AFuture Release?~ Jared M. Spool 201164Monday, 24 June 13
    • TEST YOUR PRINCIPLES1. Does It Come Directly From Research?2. Does It Help You Say No Most Of The Time?3. Does It Distinguish Your Design From YourCompetitors?4. Is it Something You Might Reverse In AFuture Release?5. Have You Evaluated It For This Project?~ Jared M. Spool 201165Monday, 24 June 13
    • TEST YOUR PRINCIPLES1. Does It Come Directly From Research?2. Does It Help You Say No Most Of The Time?3. Does It Distinguish Your Design From YourCompetitors?4. Is it Something You Might Reverse In AFuture Release?5. Have You Evaluated It For This Project?6. Is Its Meaning Constantly Tested?~ Jared M. Spool 201166Monday, 24 June 13Use  the  principles,  dont  forget  them,  iterate  and  keep  them  current.
    • SHARE,COMMUNICATE& USE67Monday, 24 June 13Once  you  have  your  design  principles,  they  should  be  communicated  with  the  whole  organisa6on  (and  beyond).  Don’t  just  keep  them  for  the  design  department,  make  them  public,  they  might  even  end  up  being  used  in  the  marke6ng  campaigns  (as  seen  by  HTC  and  EE)
    • 1. Defining the right problem2. Importance of a vision3. Design principles4. Synthesis & Perspective5. Frameworks & Templates6. Better innovation through collaboration68Monday, 24 June 13On  the  journey  to  defining  the  right  problem  and  star6ng  to  look  at  what  possible  solu6ons  their  might  be,  synthesis  and  perspec6ve  can  be  great  tools  for  the  strategic  designer.Adding  more  value  by  synthesising  the  available  informa6on  not  just  analysing  it.  And  looking  at  the  problem  from  different  perspec6ves,  to  understand  the  purpose  behind  what  your  trying  to  achieve  and  solve.
    • (asking the right questions)Synthesisingnot Analysing69Monday, 24 June 13If  analysis  is  about  reviewing  the  informa6on  and  determining  why  something  is,  Synthesis  is  about  proposing  the  way  something  could  be.  Synthesis  adds  value.“…  During  synthesis,  it  is  not  the  discrete  elements  of  data  that  are  interes6ng  so  much  as  the  rela6onship  between  these  elements.  Iden6fying  a  rela6onship  forces  the  introduc6on  of  a  credible  (although  rarely  validated)  story  of  why  the  elements  are  related.”  -­‐  Jon  Kolko
    • PUT IT ONTHE WALLSMAKE IT PHYSICAL & COLLABORATE70Monday, 24 June 13When  synthesising,  dont  hide  it  away  in  digital  files.  Make  it  physical,  something  you  can  scribble  on,  leQng  you  see  the  wood  for  the  trees,  and  open  it  up  to  being  collaborate.
    • DISTILL INTOVISUALISATIONSGet boxthrough post Open boxDropoff DropoffInstall RegisterPhysical todigital transitionTxRx71Monday, 24 June 13Create  diagrams  of  your  synthesis,  by  visualising  what  you  understand  it  helps  you  (and  others)  to  see  priori6es,  rela6onships  and  unseen  ques6ons.
    • CREATEHYPOTHESISES72Monday, 24 June 13Start  crea6ng  ‘your  best  gues6mates’,  make  some  hypothesises  which  you  want  to  prove  or  disprove.
    • MAKE IT TOBREAK IT73Monday, 24 June 13Create  a  hypothesis  to  tear  it  down  and  make  a  beGer  one.Try  and  break  it.  Why  did  it  break?  What  have  you  learnt  from  it?Then  iterate,  iterate,  iterate...
    • PROTOTYPES*74Monday, 24 June 13This  is  why  quick  prototypes  are  so  useful  for  experimen6ng  and  learning.  Work  out  what  the  Minimum  Viable  Experiment  is,  get  it  in  front  of  some  people,  and  find  out:  Is  this  the  right  direc6on?  Is  our  hypothesis  correct?
    • EXPLORE DIFFERENTPERSPECTIVES75Monday, 24 June 13Perspec6ves.  When  your  looking  at  a  problem  or  a  poten6al  solu6on  its  worth  trying  to  view  it  from  as  many  different  perspec6ves  (contexts)  as  possible.
    • lensesEXPLODE / ATOMISE76Monday, 24 June 13The  first  stage  in  this  process  is  to  atomise  it,  like  a  lego  model  take  it  a  part  and  see  it  for  all  its  elements.
    • SEE PATTERNS & THEMES77Monday, 24 June 13Zoom  in  and  out  of  the  detail,  try  and  iden6fy  the  themes  /  territories  /  paGerns
    • CONTRAST& CONTEXT78Monday, 24 June 13Some6mes  one  of  the  best  ways  to  see  the  rela6onships  is  to  use  contrast,  put  it  against  something  else,  or  to  pivot  the  context  of  use.
    • lensesLOOKING THROUGH LENSES79Monday, 24 June 13An  exercise  which  is  great  for  this  is  to  ‘look  through  a  lens’.For  example,  if  a  car  was  viewed  through  different  lenses,  you  have  the  lavish  hot  rod,  the  precision  F1,  the  safe  and  reliable  family  car  and  the  rugged  and  u6litarian  van.
    • EXAMPLE LENSESAnalytical80Monday, 24 June 13For  a  home  energy  monitoring  project  we  explored  these  lenses.  They  are  just  examples  and  their  not  right  for  every  project,  but  should  give  you  an  idea.Analy>cal:  what  is  the  best  tools  for  slicing  and  dicing  their  energy  data?
    • EXAMPLE LENSESAnalyticalEnvironmental81Monday, 24 June 13Environmental:  ‘Helping  me  understand  the  impact  of  my  ac6ons’
    • EXAMPLE LENSESAnalyticalEnvironmentalFinancial82Monday, 24 June 13Financial:  ‘Reassuring  me  that  I’m  geQng  the  best  deal’  &  ‘Helping  me  save  money  by  using  less’
    • EXAMPLE LENSESAnalyticalEnvironmentalFinancialSocial83Monday, 24 June 13Social:  ‘Sharing  my  behaviour  and  intent’,  ‘Comparing  my  ac6ons  against  others’  &  ‘Making  me  more  visible’
    • EXAMPLE LENSESAnalyticalEnvironmentalFinancialSocialGame84Monday, 24 June 13Game:  ‘Using  game  mechanics  to  encourage  behavioural  change’  &  ‘Being  playful’
    • EXAMPLE LENSESAnalyticalEnvironmentalFinancialSocialGameEditorial85Monday, 24 June 13Editorial:  ‘What  is  the  role  of  content  in  helping  people  understand  energy  use?  e.g.  educa6onal’
    • lensesCONTRAST VIA CONTEXTSchool run Road Trip86Monday, 24 June 13Or  you  can  contrast  the  context...passive  vs  ac6ve,  short  vs  long,  etc.Using  the  car  example  again:  If  your  making  a  car  for  a  school  run,  it  needs  to  be  safe  (child  friendly),  good  for  short  frequent  journeys  and  capable  of  holding  lots  of  children.Where  as  if  your  making  a  car  for  a  road  trip,  it  needs  to  be  comfortable  for  long  journeys,  capable  of  holding  luggage  and  people,  etc.
    • LATERAL REVIEWConsidering alternativeswhich have similar patternsor features87Monday, 24 June 13Another  technique  is  to  explore  laterally  compe6tors  /  inspira6on.For  example,  home  energy  monitoring...Essen6ally  by  monitoring  the  energy  use  of  your  home  your  crea6ng  a  data  feed,  it  goes  up  and  down  and  you  can  overlay  different  axis  to  see  the  ac6vity  in  different  ways.What  else  use  a  data  feed  to  monitor  ac6vity?
    • 88Monday, 24 June 13Sports  apps.  Tracking  your  ac6vity  when  cycling  (Strava),  your  driving  ac6vity  (ecoDrive)  and  running  or  general  ac6vity  monitors  like  Nike  Fuel  band.
    • nike+Runkeeper89Monday, 24 June 13There  are  lots  of  running  monitors  out  there,  2  key  examples  are  nike+  and  Runkeeper.  the  track  your  speed,  distance  and  overlay  it  with  GPS  data.
    • How can you be different?Running is running, right?90Monday, 24 June 13running  is  running  right?  its  been  done,  its  a  saturated  space,  how  could  you  differen6ate  a  new  app?
    • Zombies RUN!A running app whichcombines narrative withexercise.91Monday, 24 June 13How  about  look  at  it  through  a  narra6ve  or  game  lens?
    • 92Monday, 24 June 13“Zombies,  Run!  is  an  immersive  running  game.  Players  act  as  the  character  Runner  5  through  a  series  of  missions,  during  which  they  run  and  listen  to  various  audio  narra6ons  to  uncover  the  story.  While  running,  the  player  collects  supplies  such  as  ammuni6on,  medicine  and  baGeries  which  they  can  use  to  build  and  expand  their  base.  The  app  can  record  the  distance,  6me,  pace,  and  calories  burned  on  each  mission  through  the  use  of  the  phones  GPS  or  accelerometer.”
    • lensesLENSES, CONTRAST & LATERAL93Monday, 24 June 13ARer  you  have  exhausted  exploring  lenses,  contrast  and  lateral  you  should  end  up  with  a  wealth  of  ideas  and  thoughts  to  synthesise.
    • UNDISCOVEREDOPPORTUNITIES&UNSEEN PROBLEMS94Monday, 24 June 13By  shiRing  the  pivo6ng,  looking  at  different  perspec6ves  or  reframing  things  it  will  help  you  see  some  previously  unseen  problems,  it  should  also  help  you  uncover  some  addi6onal  opportuni6es.
    • 1. Defining the right problem2. Importance of a vision3. Design principles4. Synthesis & Perspective5. Frameworks & Templates6. Better innovation through collaboration95Monday, 24 June 13
    • Why use aframework ora template?96Monday, 24 June 13They  creates  rigger  and  efficiency,  they  help  with  making  things  replicable  -­‐  saving  you  6me  and  energy  in  the  long  run.  Most  importantly  they  help  you  focus  on  making  things  good  /  making  good  things.
    • VALUE PROPOSITIONby Stephan Liozu97Monday, 24 June 13Some  examples  of  frameworks  and  template,  as  we  have  seen  already  the  value  prop  pitch  template.
    • Primary PersonaBrands they use and like What they use online + mobile Motivations and goalsHow did they What is their Pain pointsHomeBudget Holder“ Getting more for my money andmaking it last the month”A family home, consisting of both parents and twochildren of 14 and 11. The father is a skilled manu-al worker and the mother works part time in a callcentre.“ I want to make sure I don’t over-spend on my bill”utility billor and alert reminder.“If its too dif-and register, i’mnot interested”4 peopleOne familycomputer usedby allDad has asmart phoneFamily TVgames consolePrimary PersonaBrands they use and like What they use online + mobile Motivations and goalsHow did they What is their Pain pointsHomeA young family home, consisting of a dad, mumand one child of 8. Both the parents are highlyeducated, the father commutes to work daily, themother works at home to make the familyusage”usage so they canmonitor their usageand spending.to access it.make a great differ-ence?A smaller home for a young familyin oxfordsome solarpanelsTheir garden isimportant withand greenhousean older TVbothered aboutupgradingThey cook inbulk and freezetheir foodwasteful is keyBrands they use and like What they use online + mobile Motivations and goalsHow did they What is their Pain pointsHome“ I like to be know for trying newdisposable income or access to credit fuels theirpassion.Its about being seen to be an earlyadopter”others about so others see what i’m doing.websitesharp drop off.-usage.shared with partnerOwning andgadgets are anfor themand high qualityaudio equip-mentmake life easier98Monday, 24 June 13I’m  sure  your  all  familiar  with  persona  frameworks  and  templates.
    • BUSINESS MODEL GENERATION CANVAShttp://www.businessmodelgeneration.com/canvas99Monday, 24 June 13“The  Business  Model  Canvas,  is  a  strategic  management  and  entrepreneurial  tool.  It  allows  you  to  describe,  design,  challenge,  invent,  and  pivot  your  business  model.”
    • DIYCreate your own, iterate, improve and evolve100Monday, 24 June 13Create  your  own  templates  for  your  workshops  and  yourself.  Adapt  and  evolve  them  as  you  need,  start  crea6ng  your  own  playbook.
    • 1. Defining the right problem2. Importance of a vision3. Design principles4. Synthesis & Perspective5. Frameworks & Templates6. Better innovationthrough collaboration101Monday, 24 June 13collaborate,  collaborate,  collaborate.
    • 102Monday, 24 June 13There  are  already  some  great  resources  out  there  for  crea6ve  workshop,  and  my  6me  is  limited  in  this  talk  so  I  wont  go  into  detail  on  workshops  -­‐  Also  I’ve  already  covered  some  of  it  in  the  talk.
    • Kids partyHerding cats103Monday, 24 June 13I  will  say  that  planing  and  running  a  collabora6ve  workshop  is  like  organising  a  childrens  party,  trying  to  work  out  what  party  games  will  yield  the  best  results.  Or  like  cat  herding  for  professionals,  trying  to  focus  and  mo6vate  a  variety  of  par6cipants.
    • HARMONISING / ALIGNING104Monday, 24 June 13A  key  outcome  of  collabora6ve  work  is  in  aligning  everyone  to  the  same  goal  /  objec6ve.I  have  always  found  collabora6ve  session  to  be  one  of  the  best  ways  of  harmonising  and  aligning  everyone  towards  the  same  goals,  to  understand  and  appreciate  the  complexity  of  the  problem  at  hand,  or  as  a  good  way  of  geQng  some  stakeholders  passionate  solu6on  out  into  the  open  so  that  it  can  be  discussed.
    • PROVOKE105Monday, 24 June 13Provoking  discussion  and  mo6va6ng  people  to  make  a  decision,  some6mes  the  best  thing  is  to  do  something  deliberately  wrong.One  technique  I  like  for  geQng  things  moving  when  there  is  a  lot  of  discussion  but  liGle  agreement,  is  “Go  with  the  worst  idea”  tac6c.As  described  by  Jon  Bell  as  the  “McDonald’s  for  lunch”  trick:“I  use  a  trick  with  co-­‐workers  when  we’re  trying  to  decide  where  to  eat  for  lunch  and  no  one  has  any  ideas.  I  recommend  McDonald’s.An  interes6ng  thing  happens.  Everyone  unanimously  agrees  that  we  can’t  possibly  go  to  McDonald’s,  and  beGer  lunch  sugges6ons  emerge.  Magic!It’s  as  if  we’ve  broken  the  ice  with  the  worst  possible  idea,  and  now  that  the  discussion  has  started,  people  suddenly  get  very  crea6ve.  I  call  it  the  McDonald’s  Theory:  people  are  inspired  to  come  up  with  good  ideas  to  ward  off  bad  ones.”
    • PROBE106Monday, 24 June 13Some6mes  you  need  to  more  subtle  and  discreet,  then  provoking.In  deep  space  terms,  probes  are  sent  out  to  discover  things  and  report  informa6on  back.Probes  are  fantas6c  strategic  design  tools  for  geQng  an  indica6on  of  something  (oRen  with  evidence)  and  repor6ng  informa6on  back.A  good  story  of  a  probe  is  the  Van  Halen...story“"M&Ms  (WARNING:  ABSOLUTELY  NO  BROWN  ONES)."  While  the  underlined  rider  entry  has  oRen  been  described  as  an  example  of  rock  excess,  the  outlandish  demand  of  mul6millionaires,  the  group  has  said  the  M&M  provision  was  included  to  make  sure  that  promoters  had  actually  read  its  lengthy  rider.  If  brown  M&Ms  were  in  the  backstage  candy  bowl,  Van  Halen  surmised  that  more  important  aspects  of  a  performance-­‐-­‐ligh6ng,  staging,  security,  6cke6ng-­‐-­‐may  have  been  botched  by  an  inaGen6ve  promoter.”  -­‐  Rolling  stone  magazine
    • DESIGN COMMUNICATION107Monday, 24 June 13All  to  oRen  designers  lock  themselves  away  to  craR  the  solu6on  and  only  them  come  back  and  present  it.  Design  should  take  a  lead  form  dark  rooms,  black  boxes  and  invisibility
    • COMMUNICATE & SHARE108Monday, 24 June 13I’ve  been  using  an  open  produc6on  process  for  years  now,  not  disappearing  off  in  a  dark  room  and  coming  back  with  an  amazing  solu6on.  But  geQng  everything  out  of  the  digital  files  and  up  on  the  wall  for  anyone  to  come  and  look  at,  taking  that  further  and  invi6ng  ‘walk  throughs’  for  anyone  in  the  company  to  come  and  see  what  in  progress  .  I’ve  found  it  to  be  a  great  way  of  geQng  buy  in  for  those  whom  need  to  buy  in  and  geQng  trust  from  thoues  whom  work  in  the  organisa6on.
    • Decisions109Monday, 24 June 13ORen  when  I  talk  about  this  with  others  they  ask;  how  decisions  and  sign  off  happens  with  an  open  inclusive  process?
    • Too many cooksspoil the broth...Design byCommittee110Monday, 24 June 13All  too  oRen  I  hear  the  terms:  “To  many  cooks  spoil  the  broth”  or  “I  hate  design  by  commiGee”.But  there  is  a  difference  between  leQng  others  make  design  choices  and  allowing  for  design  discussion.  Two  key  skill  in  this  senario  we  have  already  discussed  in  this  talk...
    • 1. Don’t take solutions2. Synthesise the feedback111Monday, 24 June 131.  Solu>ons.  dont  take  a  solu6on  as  a  star6ng  point,  understand  what  the  underlying  mo6va6on  is,  ‘define  the  right  problem’.2.  Synthesis.  dont  take  a  list  of  direct  ac6ons  to  work  through  synthesise  the  feedback  and  understand  how  best  to  address  it.
    • GettingDecisionsMade112Monday, 24 June 13Another  technique  to  geQng  decisions  made  is  to  get  responses  before  the  mee>ng.  Get  something  ‘signed  off’  before  the  sign-­‐off  mee6ng,  so  that  the  actual  mee6ng  is  more  of  a  formality.  This  lets  you  answer  ques6ons  and  pass  the  work  through  quickly  and  efficiently  -­‐  no  egos  need  to  come  out  between  stakeholders  in  the  mee6ng.
    • CONCLUSIONS113Monday, 24 June 13In  summary,  some  closing  thoughts.
    • Hitchhikers guide to the galaxyhttp://youtu.be/Sx2QIntaLA4114Monday, 24 June 13The  Babel  fish  from  HGTTG.Designer  need  to  be  like  babel  fish,  able  to  understand  all  languages,  developers,  business,  customers  and  be  able  to  translate  things  back  into  the  languages  of  others.
    • IS THIS THERIGHTPROBLEMTO SOLVE?115Monday, 24 June 13Always  be  asking:  is  this  the  right  problem?  Before  you  start  to  think  about  a  solu6on.
    • Will the results of our effortsbe valuable?orCould they be more valuable?116Monday, 24 June 13Always  be  looking  to  answer  these  ques6ons,  how  can  my  design/work  add  more  value?
    • MAKEEXPERIMENTS117Monday, 24 June 13Make  it  to  brake  it,  create  experiments,  build  prototypes,  understand  though  the  leanest  possible  MVP’s.
    • FACILITATORSTEWARDSHIPNEGOTIATORMOTIVATOREMPOWER118Monday, 24 June 13Skills  of  the  strategic  designer,  embrace  and  develop  these  skills.You  dont  need  to  be  the  person  with  the  brilliant  answer,  you  can  be  the  person  that  mo6vates  others  to  find  it  and/or  improves  on  it.Empowering  others  -­‐  How  can  you  make  them  look  good  /  their  life  easier?
    • Where is thefun?119Monday, 24 June 13The  fun  is  not  in  the  glamorous  stuff,  the  shiny,  the  gliGer  on  top...
    • The fun is...120Monday, 24 June 13The  fun  is  in  the  process  and  the  structure  behind  the  visible,  the  fun  is  in  making  it  happen,  in  working  the  system  to  get  the  best  result.With  every  project  Ive  worked  on  there  has  been  an  increasing  element  of  changing  the  process  /  organisa6on  to  deliver  the  right  solu6on,  to  the  right  problem  for  the  best  results.
    • OLI SHAWwww.olishaw.com@olishawhello@olishaw.comTHANK YOUwww.fluxx.uk.combig thinking, brought to life121Monday, 24 June 13Thank  you