Resume Writing Workshop

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A workshop designed by Nayelee and presented at NSC

Published in: Education, Career, Business
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Resume Writing Workshop

  1. 1. GoToCollege Ambassadors Professional Development Resume and Cover Letter Writing Workshop Nevada State CollegeNevada State College Spring 2012 1
  2. 2. Workshop Topics• Types of resumes• Cover letter• Sections of a resume and cover letter• Writing your resume and cover letter• ApplicationNevada State College Spring 2012 2
  3. 3. What is a Resume? A resume is a personal summary of your knowledge, training, and skills. Essentially, this document contains a list of attributes for futureNevada State College Spring 2012 3
  4. 4. Purpose of a Resume• Highlight your skills, qualifications, and accomplishments.• To get an interview!Nevada State College Spring 2012 4
  5. 5. Two Types of Resumes• Chronological Resume• Functional ResumeNevada State College Spring 2012 5
  6. 6. Chronological Key PointsNevada State College Spring 2012 6
  7. 7. Nevada State College Spring 2012 7
  8. 8. Functional Key PointsNevada State College Spring 2012 8
  9. 9. Nevada State College Spring 2012 9
  10. 10. Hybrid ResumesNevada State College Spring 2012 10
  11. 11. Nevada State College Spring 2012 11
  12. 12. What is a Cover Letter? A cover letter introduces you and your resume to potential employers or organizations you seek to join (non-profits, educational institutions, etc). It is the first document an employer sees; therefore, it is often the first impression you will make.Nevada State College Spring 2012 12
  13. 13. Nevada State College Spring 2012 13
  14. 14. Characteristics of a Cover Letter Cover letters do more than introduce your resume. A cover letters importance also includes its ability to:• Explain your experiences in a story-like format that works with the information provided in your resume• Allow you to go in-depth about important experiences/skills and relate them to job requirements• Show the employer that you are individualizing (tailoring) this job application• Provide a sample of your written Nevada State College Spring 2012 14
  15. 15. Sections of a ResumeNevada State College Spring 2012 15
  16. 16. Sections of a ResumeNevada State College Spring 2012 16
  17. 17. Categories of Skills• Interpersonal skills • Critical thinking skills• Oral communication skills • Creative thinking skills• Public speaking skills • Planning skills• Counseling skills • Organizational skills • Advanced writing skills• Coaching/mentoring skills • Research skills• Teaching/training skills • Administrative/clerical skills• Supervising skills • Financial skills• Leadership skills • Language skills• Persuading skills • Perceptual skills• Mediation skills • Advanced computer skills• Interviewing skills • Technological skills• Care giving skills • Performing skills• Client services skills • Artistic skills• Analytical/logical thinking skills • Mechanical skills • Adaptability skillsNevada State College Spring 2012 17
  18. 18. Review of Resume Headings• Contact information• Objective• Education• Work Experience• Activities/Honors/Volunteer Experience• Computer/language/technical skillsNevada State College Spring 2012 18
  19. 19. Sections of a Cover LetterNevada State College Spring 2012 19
  20. 20. Writing the Resume and Cover Letter• Rhetorical Awareness• User-Centered DesignNevada State College Spring 2012 20
  21. 21. Rhetorical AwarenessThe idea of rhetorical awareness for workplace writing includes the following concepts:• Workplace writing is persuasive. For example, when a writer composes a résumé, the persuasive goal is to get a job interview. Similarly, a report writer may need to persuade a client to take action to improve work conditions ensuring employee safety and timely production• Workplace writing, since its persuasive, must consider the rhetorical situation: – Purpose (why the document is being written, the goals of the document – Audience (who will read the document, includes shadow readers- unintended audiences who might read your work) – Stakeholders (who may be affected by the document or project) – Context (the background of and situation in which the document is created). Nevada State College Spring 2012 21
  22. 22. User-Centered DesignThe idea of user-centered design includes the following concepts:• Always consider and think about your audience• Consider your readers based on: – their expectations. What information do your readers expect to get? What can be provided to your readers? – their characteristics. Who, specifically, is reading the work? Is the audience part of the decision making process? Will stakeholders read the work? Or is the audience a mixture of decision makers, stakeholders, and shadow readers? What organizational positions does the audience hold and how might this affect document expectations? – their goals. What are your readers planning to accomplish? What should be included in your documents so that your readers get the information they need? – their context. For what type of situation do the readers need this information?• Identify information readers will need and make that information easily accessible and understandable – User-centered documents must be usable, so consider how the Nevada State College Spring 2012 22
  23. 23. Additional Resources• http://writingcenter.unlv.edu/• http://www.unr.edu/educ/coecareers/pdf/resume_guide.pdf• http://nsc.nevada.edu/6589.asp• http://sites.csn.edu/workforce/careercoach.aspNevada State College Spring 2012 23
  24. 24. References Material has been adapted from UNLV career services and the online writing center at Purdue University.Nevada State College Spring 2012 24

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