NECT - Deloitte Project - Brief 2014
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NECT - Deloitte Project - Brief 2014

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School Turnaround Project in Limpopo districts

School Turnaround Project in Limpopo districts

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    NECT - Deloitte Project - Brief 2014 NECT - Deloitte Project - Brief 2014 Document Transcript

    • 2014/02/13   NECT  –  Deloi2e  Project     - School Turnaround Programme (STP) – Presenter: Dr Muavia Gallie (PhD) Education Moving Up Cc. muavia@mweb.co.za http://muavia-gallie.blogspot.com http://supervisingwithadifference.blogspot.com www.slideshare.net Session  1   Focus Specific Issues •  Introduction of •  One person per participants school will introduce per school the team, and indicate •  The state of the school’s ‘dream’ education in performance level; your school •  Identify three things, in order of priority, to change IN THE SCHOOL. 2   1  
    • 2014/02/13   Conceptual tools of the Workshop Northern Pike Experiment 10% on Problem 90% on Solution 1. Theories of Education What we ought to do in schools   3. Theories of Change What causes progress towards where we want to be   Grizzly Bear Story “Shifting Paradigm” vs “Paradigm Shift” 2. Theories of Organisation How we should be set up to do it   4. Theories of Changing What has to be done to influence those causes     3   The Northern Pike Experiment •  •  •  •  •  •  •  They used a fish tank capable of being divided in half by a clear glass partition. A number of small fish (food) were placed in the other half. The pike repeatedly crashed its snout to get to the small fish. After a time, the pike gave up having learnt it was of no use. The experimenter then removed the clear glass partition. The small fish continued to swim in one half and the pike in the other, making no attempt to cross the other half of the tank. What the pike experienced in the past dictated how it reacted in the future. Are you a Northern Pike? 4   2  
    • 2014/02/13   Grizzly  Story   •  An  American took his Japanese friend for a ride •  •  •  •  •  through the woods. The vehicle broke down and they decided to walk. After some time they were confronted by a big Grizzly bear. The Japanese started taking his takkies out of his bag. The American said: “Hey, that won’t help - you can’t out-run a Grizzly bear.” To which the Japanese replied: ”I don’t have to outrun the bear -­‐  all  I  have  to  do  is  to  out-­‐run  you.”   5   10% - 90% Balance Life  is  10%  of  what   happens  to  you   (problems),  and  90%   of  how  you  respond  to   it  (soluTons). 6   3  
    • 2014/02/13   ‘Shifting Paradigm’ vs ‘Paradigm Shift’ Quite often people talk about “shifting the paradigm” when what they really mean is an alternative answer or way of explaining solutions to problems using the same but slightly changed concepts, approaches, constructs or methods. 7   Knots by R.D. Lange There is something I don’t know That I am suppose to know I don’t know what it is I don’t know And yet I am suppose to know And I feel I look stupid If I seem both not to know it And not know what it is I don’t know Therefore I pretend to know it This is nerve-racking since I don’t know What I must pretend to know Therefore, I pretend I know everything. 8   4  
    • 2014/02/13   TIMSS 2003 - Applying Maths 1.8  Mill   50-­‐   80%   6  Mill   21-­‐40%   1.2  Mill   0-­‐20%   Dysfunctional Schools - 20% 2.4  Mill   41-­‐60%   Under-Performing Schools – 50% 61-­‐80%   Chaotic Schools - 10% Exit  Focus  -­‐  Passing   81-­‐100%   Schools of Excellence – 5% 81-­‐   100%   High Functioning Schools – 15% Entrance  Focus   -­‐  Bachelors   5  Types  of  School  Performance   0.6  Mill   10   5  
    • 2014/02/13   11   School  Turnaround  Pathway   Turnaround Indicators High Performing • 100% Pass, but less then 50% Bach completion Good 15% 100% 3. Under Performing • 1 or more learners failing: Pass 80%+ 2. Dysfunctional • Less than 60% pass Weak rate 1. Chaotic ✪✪✪ ✪✪✪ ✪✪✪ ✪   100%    80%     ✪✪✪   100%    100% 80% 60%           45% 60% 40%            • Less than 40% pass Disaster 60% rate 40% 20%         Comply 30% Total 4. 5.4 Bach (Ave 80%) 100% 100% 5.3 Dip (Ave 65%) 0% 5.2 Cert (Ave 50%) Great 5.1 NSC (Just a Pass) • 100% Bachelors completion 5.0 Failure 3. Exit Pass Rate (Final Grade Pass) Excellent 4. Completion Rate (Dream Achievement) 2. Drop (Push out) Rate (Throughput rate) 5. Level Description 1. Instruction Programme (Teaching and Learning) DistribuTon  of  ‘Levels  of  Pass’   Type 100% 100% 12   6  
    • 2014/02/13   13   Session  2   Focus School Turnaround Strategy (STAS) for Developing countries, including the 8 School Readiness Components Specific Issues • 5 phases in STAS; • 50 School Operational Systems and; • 50 School Quality Systems; 14   7  
    • 2014/02/13   Barriers  to  Learning  in  South  Africa   1.   Systemic  Barriers   •  •  •  •  •  Access  to  basic  services   Poor  teaching   Lack  basic  and  appropriate  LTSM  and  AssisTve  devices;   Inadequate  faciliTes  at  schools   Overcrowded  classrooms   2.   Societal  Barriers   •  •  •  •  Abject  poverty   Late  enrolment  at  school   Urban/rural  dispariTes   DiscriminaTon  -­‐  race,  gender,  language  and  disability   3.   Academic   Barriers   Inappropriate  pedagogy   Insufficient  support  of  teachers   Inappropriate  and  unfair  assessment  procedures   Language  of  instrucTon   Inflexible  classroom  management   Inappropriate  aftudes   •  •  •  •  •  •  4.   Learner  Personal   •  DisabiliTes  (neurological,  physical,  sensory,  cogniTve)   Barriers   •  Health  (disease,  chronic  illness,  trauma)   15   Problem-­‐Solving  CM  Approach   50  School   Quality   Systems   HPS   UPS   DFS   Impact   ChaoFc  School   Results   16  STAS   Deliverables   OperaTons   Inputs   ObjecTves   Relevance   School  of  Excellence   outputs   8  School   Readiness   Components   50  School   OperaTonal   Systems   Needs   Vision   5  STAS   Principles   16   EducaTonal   Principles   Efficiency   EffecTveness   Sustainability   16   8  
    • 2014/02/13   5  Successful  Change  Steps   17   Principles  of  School  Turnaround  Strategy   1.  All  learners  were  created  to  be  SUCCESSFUL,  and   therefore  no  learner  should  fail;   2.  The  academic  ability  of  learners  is  not  linked  to  their   economic,  social  and  cultural  status  in  society  (poor   learners  can  perform  at  same  level  as  middle-­‐class  and   rich  learners);   3.  The  biggest  challenges  in  School  Turnaround  require   Adults  to  Change  (Thinking  and  Doing)  –  reconnect  them   with  the  dreams  of  learners;   4.  Move  away  for  the  Deficit  Thinking  Model,  and  the  VicFm   Mentality  Approach;   5.  Restructuring  the  current  educaTon  models  that  are   resulTng  in  DysfuncFonal-­‐by-­‐design  and  Success-­‐linked-­‐ to-­‐social-­‐status  (un-­‐  and  under-­‐qualified  and  poorly   performing  teachers  are  teaching  in  these  schools).   18   9  
    • 2014/02/13   Selecting Turnaround Models ‘Changing What for What?’   Technical       Economical       PoliFcal     Social  JusFce     19   “Children walking through the Gate” Preferred Children Reality Children 1. Country club kids 1. Township and working-class kids 2. Above the railway lines – rich suburbs 2. Below the railway lines – squatter camps, low-income housing, unemployed parents 3. Traditional family (both parents) 3. Today’s family (single or child headed) 4. Parents/family took care of them 4. Early on learning to fend for themselves 5. Have ‘talk shows’ stories 5. They have counter-stories (News bulletin) 6. Protected by the family/parents 6. Grow up on the very dark side of life 7. They are easy to teach 7. They are not the easiest to teach 8. They have long-term dreams 8. They have potential, if you believe it 9. They are predictable, sable 9. They are unpredictable, volatile 10. Their future are positively preordained 10. Their future can or can’t be negatively or positively preordained, depending on us 20   10  
    • 2014/02/13   -­‐  Turnaround  what?  -­‐       School  Pass  Rate   School  Leadership   Teacher  Competencies   Teacher  Subject  Knowledge   4   5   6   7   8   Parent/Stakeholder  Involvement   District  Support  and  Development   3   Learner  Personalised  Learning   Provincial  ImplementaFon   2   Teacher  Subject  Knowledge   EducaFon  System   1   Learner  Achievements  Gap   Purpose  of  EducaFon   What  do  we  mean?  What  are  we  talking  about?   9   10   11   12   21   3  –  6  Months   6  -­‐  9  Months   1.5  –  2.5  Years   6  –  9  Months   3  –  6  Months   Sustainability   Culture,  Climate,   RelaFonships   Curriculum   Management   Planning   Ownership   School  Turnaround  Strategy  (5  Phases)  –  3-­‐5  Years   From  ChaoTc  to  Excellence   3.  School  of  Excellence   Sustain  -­‐  InsTtuTonalisaTon   Sustain  -­‐  InsTtuTonalisaTon   50  School  Quality  Systems   Leadership   (10)   Strategic   Planning  (10)   Human   Resources  (10)   1   CCR  -­‐  Support  and  Development   Learning  and   Teaching  (10)   2   Assessment  and   Feedback  (10)   Monitoring  and   EvaluaTon  (10)   CCR  -­‐  Support  and  Development   2.  High  FuncToning  Schools   CM  -­‐  Monitoring  and  EvaluaTon   CM  -­‐  Monitoring  and  EvaluaTon   50  School  AdministraFve  Systems   Academic  (11)   AdministraTon  (14)   CommunicaTon  (6)   ICT  (7)   Pastoral  Care  (12)   Planning   Planning   8  School  Readiness  Components  (Planning)   A2endance   Teacher   InformaTon   Learner   InformaTon   Ownership   Annual   Planning   Time-­‐ Tabling   Teaching,  Learning,   Assessment  Schedule   Organogram   TLSM   Ownership   1.  ChaoTc,  DysfuncTonal  and  Under-­‐Performing  Schools   22   11  
    • 2014/02/13   50 School Operational Systems Academic (11); Administration (14); Communication (6); ICT (7); Pastoral Care (12) 1.  Teaching 2. Learning Support 1.1 Teacher Substitute Management 3. School Image 4. Principal’s Office 5. Finance and ICT 1   2.1 Co-Curricular Management 1.2 External Exams Management 4   2.2 Discipline Management 1.3 Internal Exams Management 6   2.3 Exclusion Management 3.3 Daily Bulletin Management 4.3 Inventory Management 5.3 Fin Accountability Management 1.4 Assessment Process Management 2.4 Learning Info Management 3.4 Good News Management 4.4 Human Relations Management 5.4 Data Management 1.5 Teaching Info Management 2.5 Learner Attendance Management 3.5 Parent Info and Communication Management 4.5 Teachers and Learners Risk Management 5.5 Digital Management 1.6 External Reporting Management 2.6 Rewards and Conduct Management 3.6 SMS Management 4.6 Learner Profile Management 5.6 Network Management 1.7 Teaching Process Management 2.7 Physical & Mental Health Management 3.7 Feeder Schools Management 4.7 Return on Investment Management 5.7 Publishing Management 2.8 Gifted and Talent Management 3.8 Other Schools Management 4.8 Class groups and Subjects Management 5.8 Document Management 1.9 Learner Performance Tracking Management 2.9 Special Needs Management 3.9 Enrichment Management 4.9 Literacy Management 5.9 Website Management 1.10 Second Opportunity Management 2.10 Social Support Management 3.10 Volunteerism Management 4.10 School-Workplace Management 5.10 ICT Integration Management 23   8   2   1.8 Timetable Process Management 5   7   3.1 Admissions Management 4.1 External Doc Supply to Agents Management 5.1 Funds Management 3   3.2 Calendar Management 4.2 Human Resources Management 5.2 Finance Management 60 School Quality Systems 1. Leadership 2. Strategic Planning 3. Human Resource 4. Learning and Teaching 5. Assessment and Feedback 6. Data Monitoring and Evaluation 1.1 Leadership Process 2.1 Development Process 3.1 Work Allocation and Management 4.1 Learner Care Management 5.1 Core Competencies Determination 6.1 Info and Knowledge Design 1.2 Communication Effectiveness 2.2 Action Plan Formulation 3.2 Recruit, Hire, Place and Retain 4.2 Learner Knowledge Determination 5.2 Key Process Determination 6.2 Info and Knowledge Management Process 1.3 Governance Process 2.3 Resource Allocation 3.3 Professional Knowledge, Skills and Application 4.3 Learner Diversity Segmentation 5.3 Process Design and Development 6.3 Info and Knowledge Sharing 1.4 Governance Management 2.4 Resource Redirection 3.4 Professional Ethics, Values and Attributes 4.4 Learner Context Segmentation 5.4 Process Requirements Determination 6.4 Performance and Knowledge Measures and Analysis 1.5 Succession Planning 2.5 Sourcing Process 3.5 Professional Learning 4.5 Teaching Features Determination 5.5 Implementation Management 6.5 Performance, and Knowledge Selection and Use 1.6 Performance Process 2.6 Assumption Development 3.6 Career Progression 4.6 Learner and Teacher Relationship 5.6 Assessment Preparation 6.6 Data and Knowledge Analysis 1.7 Financial Accountability 2.7 Risk Assessment 3.7 Performance Management 4.7 Learner Complaints 5.7 Second Change System 6.7 Data and Knowledge Evaluation 1.8 Financial Transparency 2.8 Resource Commitment 3.8 Performance Review 4.8 Teacher Complaints 5.8 Learner Feedback Process 6.8 Target Setting Management 1.9 Priority Determination 2.9 Deployment Management 3.9 School Climate Assessment 4.9 Learner Satisfaction Determination 5.9 Teacher Feedback Process 6.9 Success Indicators and Comparison Building 1.10 Priority Decision-Making 2.10 Assessment Management 3.10 School Environment Improvement 4.10 Learner Expectation and Achievement 5.10 Parent Involvement Management 5.10 Data, Info and Knowledge Reliability 24   12  
    • 2014/02/13   Theory  of  Change   Framing School Change Improvement Social/ Emotional Issues: •  Lack of selfesteem •  Identity crises Critical Features: •  Positive, nurturing teachers, leadership, ‘connected”/ ‘belonging’ philosophy In learner expectations and behaviour: •  Higher likelihood of success Educational Outcomes •  Higher learner achievement Academic Issues: •  Lack of relevancy to learners Social/ Emotional programmes: •  Reward system •  Peer groups •  Extra-mural activities, etc. Teaching and Learning: •  Cultural responsiveness •  Affirming potential and possibilities Adulthood Outcomes: •  Citizenry •  Leadership 25   Eight  (8)   School  Readiness   Components   (SRC)   26   13  
    • 2014/02/13   1.   Adendance   2.  Teacher   InformaFon   4.  Annual   Planning   6.  Teaching,   Learning  &   Assessment   Schedule   3.  Learner   InformaFon   5.   Timetabling   7.  Organo-­‐ gram   8.  Teaching,   Learning  &   Assessment   Materials   27   Session  3   Focus School Readiness Components 3. Learner Information Specific Issues • Learner expectation and achievement agreement. 28   14  
    • 2014/02/13   Problem  Statement   Learners   •  Teachers  don’t  believe  in   us;   •  Have  a  low  expectaTon   of  us;   •  Think  we  are  lazy;   •  That  we  have  no  pride   and  drive;   •  Don’t  trust  us;   •  Etc.   Teachers   •  Learners  are  not  serious   about  their  work  and  life;   •  Not  focused  on  their   success;   •  They  don’t  do  their   homework;   •  Etc.   Leadership   •  DisconnecTon  between  ‘teaching  and  learning’  and   ‘administraTon’.   29   Nature  of  ExpectaTons   •  Poor  families  are  living  based  on  survival,  and   therefore  don’t  have  a  concept  of  ‘dreams’  –   long-­‐Tme  expectaTons;   •  Only  focusing  on  ‘gefng  through  the  day’;   •  Don’t  have,  like  middle  and  upper  class  families,   conversaTons  around  the  dinner  table  about   “what  the  children  want  to  be  one  day”;   •  Schools  can  play  a  role  in  developing  a  dream,   and  raising  expectaTons  of  poor  kids.   30   15  
    • 2014/02/13   Student  ExpectaTon  and  Achievement  agreement  (1)   31   IdenTfy  your  Dreams   Career  Areas  (1  of  9)   1.  Engineering  and  Technology   2.  Health  and  Natural  Sciences   3.  Computers  and  ICT   4.  Business,  Finance  and  Management   5.  Agriculture  and  Environment   6.  Human  and  Social  Sciences   7.  Services   8.  Art  and  Culture   9.  Languages   32   16  
    • 2014/02/13   IdenTfy  your  Dreams   Career  Areas  (1  of  9)   1.  Engineering  and  Technology   2.  Health  and  Natural  Sciences   3.  Computers  and  ICT   4.  Business,  Finance  and   Management   5.  Agriculture  and  Environment   6.  Human  and  Social  Sciences   7.  Services   8.  Art  and  Culture   9.  Languages   Career  Fields  (8  of  49)   1.Engineering  or  Engineering  Support   2.  Architecture,  DraughTng  and  Technical  Drawing   e.  Building  and  ConstrucTon  or  Building  Support   4.  ArTsans   5.  Manufacturing   6.  AutomoTve  or  AutomoTve  Support   7.  Geology,  Mining  or  Mining  Support   8.  Woodwork  and  Furniture   33   IdenTfy  your  Dreams   Career  Areas  (1  of  9)   1.  Engineering  and  Technology   Career  Fields  (8  of  49)   2.  Health  and  Natural  Sciences   1.Engineering  or  Engineering  Support   3.  Computers  and  ICT   2.  Architecture,  DraughTng  and  Technical  Drawing   4.  Business,  Finance  and  Management   e.  Building  and  ConstrucTon  or  Building  Support   5.  Agriculture  and  Environment   4.  ArTsans   6.  Human  and  Social  Sciences   5.  Manufacturing   7.  Services   6.  AutomoTve  or  AutomoTve  Support   8.  Art  and  Culture   7.  Geology,  Mining  or  Mining  Support   9.  Languages   8.  Woodwork  and  Furniture   Specific  Jobs  (4  of  171)   1.Civil  Engineer   2.  Chemical  Engineer   3.  Electrical  Engineer   4.  Mechanical  Engineer   34   17  
    • 2014/02/13   Student  ExpectaTon  and  Achievement  agreement  (1)   35   Student  ExpectaTon  and  Achievement  agreement  (2)   36   18  
    • 2014/02/13   Student  ExpectaTon  and  Achievement  agreement  (1)   37   Feedback  from  Principal  of   JOTHS     •  Our  learners  lack  direcTon;   •  They  see  schooling  as  a  phase  that  they  need  to  pass   through;   •  And  therefore  they  put  in  li2le  effort,  just  to  pass;   •  We  have  spoken  about  learners’  dreams,  but  found  it  difficult   to  have  a  process  around  it;   •  We  have  now  embarked  on  the  construcTon  of  a  Learner   ExpectaTon  and  Achievement  Agreement;   •  The  LEAA  is  a  structured  way  of  gefng  learners  to  announce   their  dreams  and  to  work  towards  achievement  them;   •  I  can  already  sense  the  posiTveness  among  the  learners;   •  And  I  am  confident  that  this  iniTaTve  is  going  to  make  a  big   38   difference  in  their  achievement  levels.   19  
    • 2014/02/13   Feedback  from  a  Learner  at  JOTHS     •  In  2012,  the  LEAA  was  introduced  in          our  school;   •  At  that  Tme,  I  thought  that  I  already          have  goals  and  dreams;   •  But  when  I  wrote  them  down;   •  I  realised  that  I  have  been  cheaTng  myself  for  the   past  5  years;   •  By  compromising  them  since  no-­‐one  else  knew   about  my  dreams;   •  I  realised  that  I  am  capable  of  so  much  more;   •  My  marks  improved  drasTcally;   •  This  iniTaTve  really  changed  my  life.   39   Sechaba  Results  2012   40   20  
    • 2014/02/13   Session  4   Focus School Readiness Components 4. Annual Planning Specific Issues • Target setting in your school. 41   42   21  
    • 2014/02/13   Annual  Planning  (SRC)   1 Compliance Planning 2 3 4 5 Compliance Compliance, Compliance, Planning and Administrative Administrative, with Administrative and Professional requests Planning Professional and Ethical to Planning Planning District Officials 43   Annual  Planning   Implementing Description Plan Act/Do Reflect Work Schedule       Pre-Moderation       Moderation       Assessment - Summative       Assessment - Formative       Playground duty       Devotion       Parents' Meeting       SMT meeting       Staff meeting       General Staff Development       Team building       Exhibitions - LTSM       Bosberaad       AGM of parents       Sports day       Operational meeting       ANA meeting       RCL Leadership development       RCL Meetings       RCL Elections       Cluster meetings       Exhibitions - Learner Enrichment       Exhibitions - Roadshows       Excursions       Marking - Summative       Marking - Formative       District Officials meeting       Staff Functions       Monitoring & Evaluation           Act/Do Reflect Frequency Length Total Time When Scheduled Code     1 25 25   WS     25 0,5 12,5   Pmod     60 1,5 90   Mod     17 0,5 8,5         12 2 24         40 1 40         8 0,5 4        3 3 9        200 0,25 50         8 2 16         8 1 8        1 8 8        1 6 6        1 16 16         1 4 4        1 8 8        40 1 40         1 1 1        2 36 72         40 2 80         1 1 1        4 2 8    Plan                                                                                       1 2 1 30 10 4 4 2 2 8 5 5 1,5 2 2  4  8  150   50   6  8                                                              Periods pw 30min pp                                                                                                                         30 759                                                         0,5   44   510 1269 22  
    • 2014/02/13   Target  Sefng  for  All   •  Targets  for:   – Learners;   – Class-­‐group  teachers;   – Subject  teachers;   – Subject/Phase  heads;   – Principals  (school).   45   Condoned   Failures   46   23  
    • 2014/02/13   47   SOS  Learners   33  Learners  ‘At  Risk’   48   24  
    • 2014/02/13   49   50   25  
    • 2014/02/13   51   Feedback  from  3  Learners   at  JOTHS     Learner  1:    You  have  your  targets  constantly  at  the   back  of  your  mind;   Learner  2:    Others  know  about  your  target,  and   therefore  you  need  to  work  towards   your  target;   Learner  3:    The  target  is  pushing  you  to  work   harder,  and  it  builds  up  compeTTon,   especially  if  you  want  to  beat  a  certain   person.   52   26  
    • 2014/02/13   Thank  You!   53   27