Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Network
Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Network
Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Network
Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Network
Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Network
Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Network
Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Network
Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Network
Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Network
Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Network
Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Network
Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Network
Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Network
Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Network
Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Network
Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Network
Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Network
Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Network
Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Network
Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Network
Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Network
Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Network
Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Network
Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Network
Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Network
Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Network
Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Network
Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Network
Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Network
Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Network
Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Network
Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Network
Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Network
Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Network
Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Network
Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Network
Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Network
Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Network
Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Network
Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Network
Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Network
Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Network
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Network

905

Published on

Master thesis presented at UofR, Canada.

Master thesis presented at UofR, Canada.

Published in: Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
905
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
23
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. 1 Optimizing Multicast p gThroughput in IP Networks M. Reza Rahimi, M. Reza Rahimi Software Systems Engineering, University of Regina, Canada, September 2009. September 2009.
  • 2. 2 Outline O tli • Introduction  • Thesis Goal • Problems Formulation • Proposed Tree Packing Algorithms • Implementation On Standard Protocols • Some Simulation Results • Conclusion and Future DirectionsOptimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Networks
  • 3. 3 Introduction I t d ti• Data transfer over network could be categorized into  g three main groups: • Unicast: • Transfer of data from one source to one destination (Path Packing). Source: Wikipedia • Broadcast: • Transfer of data from one source to all of the entire nodes in  the network (Spanning Tree Packing ). Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Networks Source: Wikipedia
  • 4. 4 • Multicast: • Transfer of data from one source to group of destinations  but not all and not one of the nodes (Steiner Trees). Source: Wikipedia• Different Optimization Metrics  Optimization Metrics can be considered  depending on the application: • Maximum amount of information into terminals (Internet). M i     f i f i  i   i l  (I ) • Energy (Wireless Sensor Networks). • Delay (Internet Telephone).  • Fault Tolerance (specially in wireless networks). ( p y )Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Networks
  • 5. 5• In this thesis we are concerned with the Throughput Throughput (optimum data transfer )  (optimum data transfer ) and Quality in Multimedia Quality Multimedia Applications.• Let’s consider the main three mentioned problems in  much more details.• This will lead us to the following questions: • Question:  • What is the Maximum Amount of Information that can  What is the Maximum Amount of Information that can  be transferred in each scenario? Is the solution  traceable  in reasonable time ? Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Networks
  • 6. 6• Unicast: The answer  is yes according to the Maximum‐ Maximum‐ Maximum Flow Min‐Cut Theorem: Flow Min‐Cut Theorem We can find the maximum possible information  transfer rate with routing (only forwarding  information packets) in polynomial time in  Unicast Scenario.• Broadcast:  According to the Edmond’s Theorem we can  Edmond’s Theorem  find the optimum solution  in polynomial time.• S    h   So in this scenario, with routing and duplication  h     h routing and duplication the    d d l   optimum value can be reached in polynomial time.• Multicast: Unfortunately   the following result is valid : Multicast: Unfortunately , the following result is valid : Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Networks
  • 7. 7• Generally there is no Polynomial Time Generally there is no Algorithms to find the optimal Duplicate and  to find the optimal Duplicate Forward strategy in Multicasting (P≠NP). strategy in Multicasting (P≠NP).Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Networks
  • 8. 8 Network Coding vs Routing N t k C di    R tiOptimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Networks
  • 9. 9• This technique is called network coding  network coding in literature.• Network coding contains routing as a special case  The optimal network coding throughput is at least as  large as the optimal routing throughput • Question: How can we find the best coding scheme and  what is the maximum possible throughput? p g p• The first question is hard to answer in many different  cases. But there is a useful technique called CFLow which  CFLow results the throughput of network coding. lt  th  th h t  f  t k  di• This technique is used to find the upper bound on  g g p routing throughput Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Networks
  • 10. 10 Thesis Goal Th i  G l• We consider the generalized version of multicast when  there are Several Sources  Several Sources in the network.• We consider many different fairness criteria, for  y , example optimizing the minimum throughput among  sources and sources with unequal demands demands.• B th d t  t Both data transfer application and multimedia  f   li ti   d  lti di   application are considered.• Although network coding could increase the  throughput of some network dramatically, it has been  shown that for Undirected Networks (network with full  Undirected Networks (network with full  duplex communication links )  duplex communication links ) this gap is small. duplex communication links ) this gap is small Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Networks
  • 11. 11• We proposed tree multicast routing optimization  algorithms based on standard IP routing protocols, that  can achieve throughputs very close to the network  coding upper bound (92% in average). coding upper bound (92% in a erage)• For multimedia applications rate‐distortion , y framework, a metric that is usually used for measuring  g multimedia  application performance, is used. • Through simulation we show that our algorithms  achieve average multimedia multicast qualities that  are only on average, 0.44 db worse than that  achievable with network coding Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Networks
  • 12. 12 Problems Formulation P bl  F l ti• Let                            be a weighted undirected graph . weighted undirected graph• Now define to be a set of source nodes                            ,  where  |  | is the set cardinality operator.  | | y p• Let                                         be the set of sink nodes of  source Si. • as  the set of all Steiner trees  rooted at  Si  that have       as the terminal points .• A demand vector                               is said to be achievable if there exists a rate assignment function such that: Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Networks
  • 13. 13• The first constraint is the link capacity constraint  link capacity constraint that  the total flow on each link must not exceed the link  th  t t l fl     h li k  t  t  d th  li k  capacity, • The second one is the source throughput or demand throughput demand.• These constraints are the only constraints when tree  packing is allowed.Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Networks
  • 14. 14• MaxMin Multicast  MaxMin Multicast optimization problem:• When the goal is to maximize the minimum demand of   the source nodes:• If network coding is allowed, using Cflow technique, the  following program finds the upper bound on MaxMin optimization problem:  Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Networks
  • 15. 15Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Networks
  • 16. 16• Linear Multicast Optimization Problem: • Different rate priorities to different sources.• And its network coding version:  Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Networks
  • 17. 17Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Networks
  • 18. 18• Rate Distortion Optimization Problem:• This frame‐work is suitable for multimedia  applications. pp• D is the rate‐distortion function. In this thesis, a power‐ is the rate distortion function. In this thesis, a power law function will be used.• The resulting optimization problem when network  coding is allowed: Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Networks
  • 19. 19Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Networks
  • 20. 20 Proposed Tree Packing Algorithms P d T  P ki  Al ith• Three‐Classes of Cooperative Tree‐Packing Algorithms: Three‐Classes of Cooperative Tree‐ p g g • Non‐Cooperative Tree Packing Class: In this class each  Non‐Cooperative Tree Packing Class source packs its own tree independently (Greedy), according to some  strategy (e.g., minimum hop tree, minimum weight tree, maximum  weight Steiner tree). i h  S i   ) Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Networks
  • 21. 21Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Networks
  • 22. 22 • Medium‐Cooperative Tree Packing Class:  Medium‐ • Round‐robin family of tree packing algorithms. • In each round of the algorithm, each source  selects one tree according to its own strategy.  g gy • The rate assignment is postponed to the end of  each round, i.e., when each source has nominated  one tree in that round. one tree in that round • At the end of the each round, we know how  many times each edge has been selected. Thus,  the maximum rate that could be assigned to each  th   i   t  th t  ld b   i d t   h  edge is equal to the capacity of that edge, divided  by the number of times it has been selectedOptimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Networks
  • 23. 23Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Networks
  • 24. 24• Highly‐Cooperative Tree Packing Class: Highly‐ • the Rate assignment is postponed until the very last  round. • Sources pack one tree at each round, according to  their own strategy. At the end of all the rounds,  rates are assigned to the trees. g • This class of algorithms is our main proposed  solution to the distributed tree packing problem. • W   We propose the Cooperative Shortest Path Tree   th  C Cooperative Shortest Path Tree  C ti  Sh t t P th T   Packing Algorithm (CSPT CSPT) for this purpose.Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Networks
  • 25. 25Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Networks
  • 26. 26Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Networks
  • 27. 27 Why CSPT works well? Wh  CSPT  k   ll?Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Networks
  • 28. 28Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Networks
  • 29. 29Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Networks
  • 30. 30Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Networks
  • 31. 31 Implementation On the Standard  Protocols• Using OSPF as the basic protocol as the basic protocol.• OSPF routing protocol is a Link State protocol.• It is based on cost rather than hops (hops could be  considered as the special case of cost). • All the OSPF routers has the Link State Database  (LSDB) and executes Dijkstras algorithm on their  database to calculate a shortest path route to a given  destination node from the current router.• The routers database information are periodically sent  to the entire routers in the network. Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Networks
  • 32. 32• In OSPF, two important multicast addresses are used. • When an OSPF area is started, one router is elected the  Designated Router (DR), and another as the Backup Designated Router (BDR)• The Designated Router tells all the other routers about  changes in the network by sending out Link State Advertisements (LSA) on multicast address 224.0.0.5. • Every change in the network topology will be send by  the OSPF routers on multicast address 224.0.0.6,  the OSPF routers on multicast address 224 0 0 6   reserved for the DR and BDR.  Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Networks
  • 33. 33• Using OSPF , 3 classes of tree packing could be  implemented as follows: i l d   f ll Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Networks
  • 34. 34 Some Simulation Results S  Si l ti  R lt• Random graph with 50 nodes  uniform link capacity  nodes, uniform link capacity  ranged [1,10] G is considered and network degree from 2 to 10. • Up to 5 source nodes and total number of 30 terminals  are considered. Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Networks
  • 35. 35• Simulation Results of the MaxMin Multicast  Optimization Problem : O i i i  P bl  • The throughput is defined as:• The following averaged results obtained: CSPT Cooperative Shortest Path Tree NCSTEIN NON-COOPEARIVE STEINER MCSTEIN MEDIUM – COOPERTIVE STEINER MCDIJK MEDIUM- COOPERTIVE DIJKSTRA MCBFS MEDIUM- COOPERTIVE BFS NCBFS NON-COOPEARIVE STEINER NCDIJK NON-COOPERATIVE DIJKSTRA Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Networks
  • 36. 36• Convergence Speed:  • The relation of the average number of trees and the  average percentage of the CSPT, NCSTEINE and  MCSTEINE throughput to the network coding  g p g throughput: Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Networks
  • 37. 37Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Networks
  • 38. 38• Linear Multicast Optimization Problem:• It reaches on average to the 90% of network coding.• The following shows the examples with some priority  vector.Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Networks
  • 39. 39• Simulation Results of the Rate Distortion Optimization  Problem : Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Networks
  • 40. 40Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Networks
  • 41. 41 Conclusion and Future Directions C l i   d F t  Di ti• In this thesis the problem of IP multicast in multi In this thesis the problem of IP multicast in multi‐ source environments is discussed and formulated.• We have proposed a novel tree packing algorithm called  p p p g g CSPT which has the throughput close to the network  coding or in average about 92% of the network coding. • F   lti di applications, CSPT has 0.44db diff For multimedia li ti  CSPT h   db difference    with network coding performance• With packing 8 trees per source using CSPT, one could  reach the throughput of 50% of network coding for data  transfer applications and 3.27db different with network  coding for multimedia applications. coding for multimedia applications Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Networks
  • 42. 42• There are some issued that should be considered: • Directect network should be studied. • Noisy network should be considered. • For multimedia application, correlated source should  be considered. Optimizing Multicast Throughput in IP Networks

×