Learn about successful online course facilitation.  View some active examples of these practices for adult and student lea...
Learning is social. <ul><li>Learning is social…and online learning environments engage students first and foremost for tha...
Online learning is different. <ul><li>We must be careful to avoid trying to engage students in online learning environment...
Based on our own experiences as students and facilitators, we would like to share eight valuable tips with you…
<ul><li>Make everyone feel welcome; create a comfortable environment where everyone has a voice.  </li></ul>
<ul><li>Make everyone feel welcome; create a comfortable environment where everyone has a voice.  </li></ul>
<ul><li>Establish clear goals and expectations from the beginning.  Create a structure that is reliable and predictable wi...
<ul><li>Establish clear goals and expectations from the beginning.  Create a structure that is reliable and predictable wi...
<ul><li>Establish clear goals and expectations from the beginning.  Create a structure that is reliable and predictable wi...
<ul><li>Participate in forums and group discussions so you are actively “in the loop” . </li></ul>
<ul><li>Participate in forums and group discussions so you are actively “in the loop” . </li></ul>
<ul><li>Online students can be very tentative or easily frustrated using the medium.  Be sensitive and responsive. </li></ul>
<ul><li>Online students can be very tentative or easily frustrated using the medium.  Be sensitive and responsive. </li></...
<ul><li>Online students need response to questions within 24 hours (or sooner). </li></ul><ul><li>Virtual office hours are...
<ul><li>Online students need response to questions within 24 hours (or sooner). </li></ul><ul><li>Virtual office hours are...
<ul><li>Use group work and collaboration. </li></ul><ul><li>Most students prefer to learn with and from </li></ul><ul><li>...
<ul><li>Use group work and collaboration. </li></ul><ul><li>Most students prefer to learn with and from </li></ul><ul><li>...
<ul><li>Use group work and collaboration. </li></ul><ul><li>Most students prefer to learn with and from each other, and th...
<ul><li>Deliberately give options in product development & form. </li></ul><ul><li>Allow purposeful debate. </li></ul><ul>...
<ul><li>Deliberately give options in product development & form. </li></ul><ul><li>Allow purposeful debate. </li></ul><ul>...
<ul><li>Poll your students on their satisfaction and growth of knowledge. </li></ul><ul><li>Participate in your level of p...
<ul><li>Poll your students on their satisfaction and growth of knowledge. </li></ul>
 
<ul><li>Participate in your level of professional societies.  </li></ul>
<ul><li>Use Social And Emotional Aspects </li></ul><ul><li>Provide Structure & Reliability </li></ul><ul><li>Prevent Stagn...
Suggested  Further Exploration <ul><li>Moodle Mayhem Users Group.  </li></ul><ul><li> “ 8 Tips For Successful Online Facil...
About Us <ul><li>San Antonio ISD Instructional Technology </li></ul><ul><li>http:// itls.saisd.net /   </li></ul><ul><li>G...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

8 tips for successful online course facilitation

1,301 views
1,214 views

Published on

Tech Fiesta presentation for Region 20, San Antonio, Texas

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,301
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
462
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
3
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Learning is social. Acknowledge the “social dimension” of learning from the beginning by introducing yourself and “touring the room”/give a brief introduction. Create a warm, welcoming, and supportive atmosphere with a startup forum introducing participants. Respond individually to email questions as quickly as possible. Use names. Support learning conversations (rather than dominate or lecture) with praise, question responses, and summarizing or “librarying” lengthy points. Encourage participants who connect learning experiences to workshop content. Assume good intent, and remind others of this with praise and recognition of effort. Irony and humor rarely translates well online, so think about using emoticons to clarify points.  Role model participation.
  • Learning is social. Acknowledge the “social dimension” of learning from the beginning by introducing yourself and “touring the room”/give a brief introduction. Create a warm, welcoming, and supportive atmosphere with a startup forum introducing participants. Respond individually to email questions as quickly as possible. Use names. Support learning conversations (rather than dominate or lecture) with praise, question responses, and summarizing or “librarying” lengthy points. Encourage participants who connect learning experiences to workshop content. Assume good intent, and remind others of this with praise and recognition of effort. Irony and humor rarely translates well online, so think about using emoticons to clarify points.  Role model participation.
  • Goals &amp; Expectations Explain basic expectations from the beginning. What does successful participation look like? Anything that will be graded or evaluated must have the evaluation criteria or rubric posted before a response is required. Structure Chunk learning into predictable modules, blocks, or lessons. Weekly checklists our calendars are awesome guideposts for students. Part of guiding your students through the course is releasing information on a measured timetable (aka pacing). Resources Start every course with a resources section containing announcements, resource links, facilitator contact information, and a general course outline.
  • Goals &amp; Expectations Explain basic expectations from the beginning. What does successful participation look like? Anything that will be graded or evaluated must have the evaluation criteria or rubric posted before a response is required. Structure Chunk learning into predictable modules, blocks, or lessons. Weekly checklists our calendars are awesome guideposts for students. Part of guiding your students through the course is releasing information on a measured timetable (aka pacing). Resources Start every course with a resources section containing announcements, resource links, facilitator contact information, and a general course outline.
  • Goals &amp; Expectations Explain basic expectations from the beginning. What does successful participation look like? Anything that will be graded or evaluated must have the evaluation criteria or rubric posted before a response is required. Structure Chunk learning into predictable modules, blocks, or lessons. Weekly checklists our calendars are awesome guideposts for students. Part of guiding your students through the course is releasing information on a measured timetable (aka pacing). Resources Start every course with a resources section containing announcements, resource links, facilitator contact information, and a general course outline.
  • Participate Students can occasionally get off topic. Gently redirect off-topic responses by responding to group forums with quick summaries, highlights of key points, or questions. Students who know you are involved in the lesson will generally stay on point. Bring closure to each and every forum. Stagnancy Prevention Acknowledge good conversation contributions by name. Be creative by using graphics, photos, or links to brighten discussion board topics. Rewrite dull topics from a too-predictable format by writing from the viewpoint of a character. Occasionally require small group/partner pairs’ response to forums. Make sure the discussion is in sync with the curriculum. If participation is low, introduce a new resource or allow different response types (video, audio, mind map, etc.) Prevent Dropout Reply to messages that get no other recognition, even if it is a “treading water” reply. Call students who have not checked into the course for more than 3 days. Let your students know if you will be out of contact for more than 24 hours. Give reminders so major deadlines do not creep by participants.
  • Participate Students can occasionally get off topic. Gently redirect off-topic responses by responding to group forums with quick summaries, highlights of key points, or questions. Students who know you are involved in the lesson will generally stay on point. Bring closure to each and every forum. Stagnancy Prevention Acknowledge good conversation contributions by name. Be creative by using graphics, photos, or links to brighten discussion board topics. Rewrite dull topics from a too-predictable format by writing from the viewpoint of a character. Occasionally require small group/partner pairs’ response to forums. Make sure the discussion is in sync with the curriculum. If participation is low, introduce a new resource or allow different response types (video, audio, mind map, etc.) Prevent Dropout Reply to messages that get no other recognition, even if it is a “treading water” reply. Call students who have not checked into the course for more than 3 days. Let your students know if you will be out of contact for more than 24 hours. Give reminders so major deadlines do not creep by participants.
  • Be Sensitive Not everyone in your class is a techno-genius. Especially in the first few weeks, be aware of participants who are last to respond or late. Make one-to-one contact with them in a supportive manner. Some students are hyperaware of their written communication skills. If this seems to be a problem, try allowing for bulleted or visual responses (mind maps, audio recordings, photos, etc.) Some students are easily bored by simple layouts, and others are overwhelmed by complicated ones. Get to know your students; accelerate/expect more from the bored ones, and give more support to those that are visually overwhelmed. Some students will not ask for help if they get stuck or frustrated. These should be referred, gently, to a scaffold, such as a checklist, guide, or additional resource.
  • Be Sensitive Not everyone in your class is a techno-genius. Especially in the first few weeks, be aware of participants who are last to respond or late. Make one-to-one contact with them in a supportive manner. Some students are hyperaware of their written communication skills. If this seems to be a problem, try allowing for bulleted or visual responses (mind maps, audio recordings, photos, etc.) Some students are easily bored by simple layouts, and others are overwhelmed by complicated ones. Get to know your students; accelerate/expect more from the bored ones, and give more support to those that are visually overwhelmed. Some students will not ask for help if they get stuck or frustrated. These should be referred, gently, to a scaffold, such as a checklist, guide, or additional resource.
  • Another way to be responsive is to create an FAQ section in your resources. This will allow you to put information “out there” that your students have been asking about on a one-to-one basis without singling out any particular student.
  • Another way to be responsive is to create an FAQ section in your resources. This will allow you to put information “out there” that your students have been asking about on a one-to-one basis without singling out any particular student.
  • Start with small group activities that clearly define roles and expectations. Remind everyone that w orking in isolation is an employment rarity. Use good instruction design … see the schematic about “what people remember”. Foster communication among group members that is purposeful and polite. Hey, use games!
  • Start with small groups, and clearly define roles and expectations. Reminder: w orking in isolation is an employment rarity.
  • Start with small group activities that clearly define roles and expectations. Remind everyone that w orking in isolation is an employment rarity. Use good instruction design … see the schematic about “what people remember”. Foster communication among group members that is purposeful and polite. Hey, use games!
  • Most online students have needs that are not being met in the classroom, or they are seeking opportunities not available locally. Play the Forest Gump “shrimp” here. Mention BrainPop and United Streaming.
  • Most online students have needs that are not being met in the classroom, or they are seeking opportunities not available locally. Play the Forest Gump “shrimp” here. Mention BrainPop and United Streaming.
  • http://elearnmag.org/
  • http://elearnmag.org/
  • http://elearnmag.org/
  • http://elearnmag.org/
  • 8 tips for successful online course facilitation

    1. 1. Learn about successful online course facilitation. View some active examples of these practices for adult and student learners. San Antonio ISD Office of Instructional Technology and Learning Services
    2. 2. Learning is social. <ul><li>Learning is social…and online learning environments engage students first and foremost for that reason. </li></ul>
    3. 3. Online learning is different. <ul><li>We must be careful to avoid trying to engage students in online learning environments with traditional, face to face techniques. </li></ul><ul><li>We have discovered that the outcome rarely matches expectation when old approaches are forced into the new arena of online learning. </li></ul>
    4. 4. Based on our own experiences as students and facilitators, we would like to share eight valuable tips with you…
    5. 5. <ul><li>Make everyone feel welcome; create a comfortable environment where everyone has a voice. </li></ul>
    6. 6. <ul><li>Make everyone feel welcome; create a comfortable environment where everyone has a voice. </li></ul>
    7. 7. <ul><li>Establish clear goals and expectations from the beginning. Create a structure that is reliable and predictable with embedded resources. </li></ul>
    8. 8. <ul><li>Establish clear goals and expectations from the beginning. Create a structure that is reliable and predictable with embedded resources. </li></ul>
    9. 9. <ul><li>Establish clear goals and expectations from the beginning. Create a structure that is reliable and predictable with embedded resources. </li></ul>
    10. 10. <ul><li>Participate in forums and group discussions so you are actively “in the loop” . </li></ul>
    11. 11. <ul><li>Participate in forums and group discussions so you are actively “in the loop” . </li></ul>
    12. 12. <ul><li>Online students can be very tentative or easily frustrated using the medium. Be sensitive and responsive. </li></ul>
    13. 13. <ul><li>Online students can be very tentative or easily frustrated using the medium. Be sensitive and responsive. </li></ul>Guide me Guide me
    14. 14. <ul><li>Online students need response to questions within 24 hours (or sooner). </li></ul><ul><li>Virtual office hours are a good idea, too. </li></ul>
    15. 15. <ul><li>Online students need response to questions within 24 hours (or sooner). </li></ul><ul><li>Virtual office hours are a good idea, too. </li></ul>
    16. 16. <ul><li>Use group work and collaboration. </li></ul><ul><li>Most students prefer to learn with and from </li></ul><ul><li>each other, and they prefer active learning. </li></ul>
    17. 17. <ul><li>Use group work and collaboration. </li></ul><ul><li>Most students prefer to learn with and from </li></ul><ul><li>each other, and they prefer active learning. </li></ul>
    18. 18. <ul><li>Use group work and collaboration. </li></ul><ul><li>Most students prefer to learn with and from each other, and they prefer active learning. </li></ul>
    19. 19. <ul><li>Deliberately give options in product development & form. </li></ul><ul><li>Allow purposeful debate. </li></ul><ul><li>Support learning with multimedia. </li></ul>
    20. 20. <ul><li>Deliberately give options in product development & form. </li></ul><ul><li>Allow purposeful debate. </li></ul><ul><li>Support learning with multimedia. </li></ul>
    21. 21. <ul><li>Poll your students on their satisfaction and growth of knowledge. </li></ul><ul><li>Participate in your level of professional societies. </li></ul>
    22. 22. <ul><li>Poll your students on their satisfaction and growth of knowledge. </li></ul>
    23. 24. <ul><li>Participate in your level of professional societies. </li></ul>
    24. 25. <ul><li>Use Social And Emotional Aspects </li></ul><ul><li>Provide Structure & Reliability </li></ul><ul><li>Prevent Stagnancy & Dropout </li></ul><ul><li>Be Ready for Technophobia </li></ul><ul><li>Be available </li></ul><ul><li>Peer Interaction is Essential </li></ul><ul><li>Understand Diversity in Learning </li></ul><ul><li>Emerge, Change, And Grow </li></ul>What We’ve Learned Is…
    25. 26. Suggested Further Exploration <ul><li>Moodle Mayhem Users Group. </li></ul><ul><li> “ 8 Tips For Successful Online Facilitation”. http://sites.google.com/site/moodlemayhem/8-tips-for-successful-online-course-facilitation </li></ul><ul><li>Middle School Technology Applications Online. SAISD. </li></ul><ul><li>http://intouch.saisd.net/mstateks/ </li></ul><ul><li>Exploring Possibilities for Moodle and Adult Learners . SAISD. http://moodlepossibilities.pbworks.com/ </li></ul>
    26. 27. About Us <ul><li>San Antonio ISD Instructional Technology </li></ul><ul><li>http:// itls.saisd.net / </li></ul><ul><li>Guhlin, Miguel. Director of Instructional Technology. [email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>Mills, Tonya. Coordinator. [email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>Valdez, Molly. Virtual Learning Coordinator. [email_address] </li></ul>

    ×