Sis thu 1045 lance loveday

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  • I grew up believing I had no artistic or creative talent whatsoever. I couldn ’t sing, dance write, draw or play an instrument. I could hardly put together an outfit. And I had it reinforced in school – I was pegged as analytical. All these things that are viewed as the opposite of creative. So I spent most of my life believing that I wasn’t creative. It wasn’t until I was having lunch with some designer friends I’d made… That turned out to be a life-changing moment for me. I hate being a UX professional sometimes. Because you end up wishing that everything was just a little bit better – ALL THE TIME. You notice things other people don ’t. It’s hard to enjoy anything when you’re busy critiquing the design of everything. But on the flip side, you develop a fine-tuned appreciation for how seemingly little details can turn a routine and mediocre experience into something sublime.
  • pixels
  • Changing the button was secondary. The button was just a symptom. “Pustule on the ass end of this bad UX.” The difference was the change in attitude embodied by being willing to value and change the UX to make it better for the user.
  • This is using design as a noun – and the designer as a brush. Designer as a commodity, infinitely swappable, undervalue design, impatience, lack of understanding as to what designers could bring to the process. What a waste. Loss of opportunity, loss of expertise, source of stress, mediocrity and badness in the world.
  • Get past mediocrity to achieve true success
  • Virgin – Their newest plane. Or exploratory submarine. Spaceship 3? Virgin has the whole ecosystem. Care about experience, Positive to do business with them,
  • Design Thinking – “As if you can replicate genius.” GET SOURCE. Acknowledgment of how little time is actually spent – on what turns out to be one of the most valuable activities a company can engage in.
  • This is how people want to approach design and design thinking. But it ’s bound to fail in many cases, and/or lead to mediocre results. Right approach is to start with leadership. But for that to happen, the Boards of Directors have to start valuing design. Which means the association between good design and business results will have to become clearer.
  • Shift toward digital, user empowerment, ability to preview, multiple tabs, user expectations and sophistication increasing – arms race. <Add screen shot of search results w/previews?> You will be pitted side by side w/competitors more and more. Increased bandwidth, ease of navigation. Design too important to leave to designers. Opportunity for us all to tap into and express our internal Creative. Make us more complete and happier people. Wouldn ’t that be something?
  • Closed Loop Marketing, Inc.
  • MIT Book – “WoW can be seen not only as an allegory of today but also a virtual prototype of tomorrow, of a real human future in which tribe-like groups will engage in combat over declining natural resources, build temporary alliances based on the basis of mutual self-interest, and seek a set of values that transcend the need for war.” – Sociologist William Sims Bainbridge from his book “The Warcraft Civilization: Social Science in a Virtual World
  • Brain-scanning studies of various leaders
  • Sis thu 1045 lance loveday

    1. 1. The Power of Design: Success vs. Mediocrity Lance Loveday, CEO Closed Loop Marketing
    2. 2. Design as Game-Changer
    3. 3. Good Design
    4. 4. Bad Design
    5. 5. What Does Design Mean?
    6. 6. Design – Noun or Verb? <ul><li>Design – n. </li></ul><ul><li>Aesthetic, surface properties </li></ul><ul><li>The physical shape and contour of an object </li></ul><ul><li>Static, passive, visual, functional </li></ul>Design – v. <ul><li>Envision, plan, create, clarify, build, enrich </li></ul><ul><li>Vigorous approach to communicating, solving problems and identify new opportunities </li></ul><ul><li>To craft an experience </li></ul>http://divergentmba.wordpress.com/2011/04/02/design-fundamentals-tools-and-techniques-to-foster-innovation/
    7. 8. Design Matters
    8. 9. Design Matters $1M
    9. 10. Design Matters <ul><li>10 companies </li></ul><ul><li>Investment criteria: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>A demonstrated care in the design of their products and web site </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>A history of innovation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>They inspire loyalty in their customer base </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Doing business with them is a positive experience </li></ul></ul>
    10. 11. Why Design Is So Challenging
    11. 12. Why Designers Fail http://www.scottberkun.com/blog/2008/why-designers-fail-the-report/
    12. 13. The Main Challenges Are Organizational
    13. 14. “ In many organizations, design is not seen as a critical thinking skill, it is thought of as a process for execution once the hard decisions are made.” - Designer
    14. 15. Some Companies Have Bypassed This Dysfunction And Utilized Design to Achieve A Competitive Advantage
    15. 17. What ’s Different About Design-Centric Companies
    16. 18. Attributes <ul><li>Process </li></ul><ul><li>Culture </li></ul><ul><li>People </li></ul><ul><li>Leadership </li></ul>
    17. 19. Design Success Factors <ul><li>Process </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Prototyping </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Exposure Hours </li></ul></ul>
    18. 20. Design Success Factors <ul><li>Culture </li></ul>“ The best ideas come from the collaborative efforts of small, closely-knit project teams and an environment unlimited by adversity to risk.” - Burt Rutan BAD GOOD Consensus-driven Autonomy Design by committee Test & learn Failure avoidance Error recovery HiPPO Accountable managers Quant-focused Vision>Qual>Quant
    19. 21. Design Success Factors <ul><li>People </li></ul><ul><ul><li>N Factor </li></ul></ul>I E S T F P J N
    20. 22. Design Success Factors <ul><li>Design/UX Team Structure </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Strong, visionary executive </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Holistic purview </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Empowered to steamroll </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Quota </li></ul></ul>
    21. 23. Design Success Factors
    22. 24. The Right Approach? <ul><li>Process </li></ul><ul><li>Leadership </li></ul><ul><li>People </li></ul><ul><li>Culture </li></ul>
    23. 25. Design Matters
    24. 26. Design Is Too Important to Leave to Designers
    25. 27. Thank You “ Design is not a single activity; it is an organic collection of interconnected practices that create value.” - Tom Wujeck
    26. 29. Design Thinking
    27. 32. “ a virtual prototype of tomorrow, of a real human future in which tribe-like groups will engage in combat over declining natural resources, build temporary alliances based on the basis of mutual self-interest, and seek a set of values that transcend the need for war.” – Sociologist William Sims Bainbridge from his book “The Warcraft Civilization: Social Science in a Virtual World
    28. 33. Home Page As CEO Personality Test

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