• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Digital Storytelling Presentation
 

Digital Storytelling Presentation

on

  • 1,774 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,774
Views on SlideShare
1,774
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
2
Downloads
50
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • Digital storytelling Digital storytelling has been identified as the best technological innovation that can improve the way students learn and teachers work in the field of education. Digital storytelling was presented to the Decatur County Board of Education by change agent and presenter Marion Bush.
  • Walden University Education Specialist Program: Educational Technology EDUC-7101-2/EDUC-8841-2 Dr. Amar Almasude: instructor
  • Diffusion and the integration of technology in education involves: The overall process of invention, innovation, and diffusion process describes technological change. In other words, technological change is the invention of technology that continues to improve by becoming cheaper and continues its diffusion throughout society and in the industry.
  • Digital storytelling is defined as a grassroots movement that uses new digital tools to aide ordinary people to tell their true stories in a compelling and emotionally engaging form which are usually short and can be interactive .
  • The diffusion development process involves: The explanation for the need, researchers or research organization, development, and the commercialization of digital storytelling.
  • Stage one the need for digital storytelling explains that storytelling has been around for centuries and with the emergence of digital technologies and tools bought on the movement of digital storytelling. Digital storytelling provided people with ways to tell stories in a more compelling and interesting manner.
  • Stage 2: Research Who were the researchers of digital storytelling? Joe Lambert Dana Atchley Abbe Don Brenda Laurel Pedro Meyers John Hartley Kelly McWilliam
  • In the development stage of digital storytelling one problem that was found was the availability of technology.
  • Stage 4 Commercialization of digital Storytelling was promoted through conferences, staff development, workshops, youtube, my space, and different websites.
  • The Innovation –Decision Process Lambert states that "Digital storytelling begins with the sharing one's story through multiple medium such as images, text, voice, sound, music, video and animation will be the principle hobby of the world's people" (Lambert, n.d.)
  • Knowledge 1986 - Joe Lambert (executive director of the new Life On The Water Theater Company in San Francisco, California) meets Dana Atchley (local video producer), after viewing a production. 1988 Lambert and Atchley worked together to collaborate and develop Atchley’s Next Exit, an interactive theoretical performance (Center for Digital Storytelling, n.d.).
  • Persuasion 1993 – Three digital storytelling workshops for documentary filmmakers were taught by Lambert and Atchley, at the American Film Institute in Los Angeles, California provided by the Center for Digital Storytelling.
  • Decision 1993 - New media salons, (a central point for dialogue among Bay Area new media producers were launched by Lambert and Atchley.
  • Implementation 1994-1998 - “ ‘Home Movies’ digital storytelling workshops created by Life on the Water lead Atchley, Lambert and and Nina Mullen (Lambert’s wife) to find the San Francisco Digital Media Center.
  • Confirmatio n 1994 – Digital storytelling on was featured on CNN and MSNBC and the SFDMC collaborates with numerous organizations in England, Germany, and Denmark. 1996 –The first Digital Storytelling Cookbook a hands-on production tutorial was published by SFDMC.
  • The S-Curve of digital storytelling is normal but it accelerates to the maximum after half of individuals of the system adopts digital storytelling and increases gradually but at a slower rate.
  • The s-curve presents the dates of adoption by various organizations and the data reveals the adoption of Digital Storytelling does not fit the norm but does slowly increase over time. Some organizations adopted this innovations at the same time.
  • The rate of adoption of digital storytelling in an educational setting is at different rates.
  • The innovator for digital storytelling in education is the Board of education who include digital storytelling and the Internet in the curriculum and instruction.
  • The early adopters of digital storytelling were t he teachers that used digital storytelling in their classroom. The late majority are t he teachers that utilize digital storytelling but only because the other teachers are already using the innovation in the classroom.
  • The early majority were the teachers that utilized digital storytelling in the classroom as a part of their instruction.
  • According to Rogers, critical Mass occurs at the point at which enough individuals in a system have adopted an innovation so that the innovation’s further rate of adoption becomes self-sustaining. Critical mass is reached in education when teachers demanded training and attended more digital storytelling workshops.
  • The Laggard is teachers that are set in their ways but will use digital storytelling in the classroom but only because it is required of them to use in the classroom.
  • Perceived Attributes Observability: The teachers that were in doubt when using digital storytelling but become willing to at least try digital storytelling.
  • Decentralized Diffusion In an educational setting of grades 9-12, digital storytelling would be diffused through a decentralized diffusion system. Rogers states that decentralized diffusion occurs when innovations originate from numerous local sources and then evolve as they diffuse via horizontal networks. The 9-12 educational system may diffuse based on usage, adaptation and need
  • Key Change Agents Rogers states that a change agent is an individual who influenced clients’ innovation-decisions in a direction deemed desirable. Some key change agents maybe classroom teachers including myself, media specialist, administrators and other school policy personnel who have adopted digital storytelling into the school system’s curriculum. These are adopters would have great influence over others in the school system to adopt digital storytelling.
  • Critical Mass Met In education critical mass has been reached for digital storytelling when in 1999 there was a demand for CDS annual workshops and training that was requested nationally and internationally.
  • The Champions of Digital Storytelling are: Teachers Students Parents and family members Community members
  • Using Digital Storytelling in the Classroom is: An effective way to engage students in their learning and as a medium that is relevant and meaningful to their lives through the use of computers.
  • An opportunity to use their ability to tell stories in a variety of ways such as through sounds, music, graphics, photographs, and original artwork as well as to express their creativity in ways other than just text.
  • An opportunity for students to use and build planning skills, organization skills, and time management skills.
  • Digital Storytelling is Important because it: Helps to develop students visual and multimedia literacy. Helps students to write effectively. Teaches technology, information, and visual literacy as well as encourages self-directed and self-motivated learning experiences. Engages students in their learning .
  • The Need Digital storytelling provide ways for students: to be engaged and motivated. to express themselves to improve writing skills to develop technology skills
  • Why Adopt Digital Storytelling! The Decatur County Board of Education should adopt digital storytelling in it’s system’s curriculum and instruction because of the benefits it will provide to the students as well as to the teachers. It is not very expensive because the school system already has the technology available to put these stories together.
  • The benefits of digital storytelling are that it can be used in instruction in all subject areas and enhance students writing, communication, planning, creative and organization skills.

Digital Storytelling Presentation Digital Storytelling Presentation Presentation Transcript

  • DIGITAL STORYTELLING
    • Presented to:
    • The Decatur County Board of Education
    • Presenter: Marion Bush
    • (Microsoft Company, 2007
  • WALDEN UNIVERSITY EDUCATION SPECIALIST PROGRAM: EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY EDUC-7101-2/EDUC-8841-2 DR. AMAR ALMASUDE: INSTRUCTOR Microsoft Company, 2010
    • Diffusion and the Integration of
    • Technology in Education
    • The overall process of invention, innovation, and diffusion process describes
    • technological change. In other words, technological change is the invention of
    • technology that continues to improve by becoming cheaper and continues its diffusion
    • throughout society and in the industry (Wikipedia, 2011).
    • (Microsoft Company, 2010)
  • THE DEFINITION OF DIGITAL STORYTELLING Digital storytelling is defined as a grassroots movement that uses new digital tools to aide ordinary people to tell their true stories in a compelling and emotionally engaging form which are usually short and can be interactive (Wikipedia, 2011) . (Writers Store, 2011)
  • DIFFUSION DEVELOPMENT PROCESS: The explanation for the need, research organization, development, and the commercialization of digital storytelling. (Tolisano, 2008)
  • STAGE 1: NEED WHAT NEED GAVE WAY TO THE RISE OF DIGITAL STORYTELLING?
    • Storytelling has been around for centuries and with the
    • emergence of digital technologies and tools bought on the
    • movement of digital storytelling. Digital storytelling provided
    • people with ways to tell stories in a more compelling and
    • interesting manner.
    • (Microsoft Company, 2007)
  • STAGE 2: RESEARCH WHO WERE THE RESEARCHERS OF DIGITAL STORYTELLING?
    • Joe Lambert
    • Dana Atchley
    • Abbe Don
    • Brenda Laurel
    • Pedro Meyers
    • John Hartley
    • Kelly McWilliam (Wikipedia, 2011)
    • (Microsoft Company, 2007)
  • STAGE 3: DEVELOPMENT
    • What problems did Digital storytelling encounter in the
    • development process? One problem that was found was
    • the availability of technology.
    • (Microsoft Company, 2007)
  • STAGE 4: COMMERCIALIZATION
    • How was digital storytelling promoted to attract manufactories?
    • Digital Storytelling was promoted through conferences, staff
    • development, workshops, youtube, my space, and different
    • websites.
    • (Microsoft Company, 2007)
  • THE INNOVATION –DECISION PROCESS
    • "Digital storytelling begins with the sharing one's story through multiple medium such as imagery, text, voice, sound, music, video and animation will be the principal hobby of the world's people" (Joe Lambert, co-founder of the Center for Digital Story Telling).
    (Microsoft Company, 2007)
  • KNOWLEDGE
    • 1986 - Joe Lambert (executive director of the new Life On The Water Theater Company in San Francisco, California) meets Dana Atchley (local video producer), after viewing a production.
    • 1988 Lambert and Atchley worked together to collaborate and develop Atchley’s Next Exit, an interactive theoretical performance (Center for Digital Storytelling, n.d.). http://storycenter.org/timeline.html
    • Microsoft Co., 2007)
  • PERSUASION
    • 1993 – Three digital storytelling workshops for documentary filmmakers were taught by Lambert and Atchley, at the American Film Institute in Los Angeles, California provided by the Center for Digital Storytelling. http://storycenter.org/timeline.html
    • (Microsoft Company, 2007)
  • DECISION
    • 1993 - New media salons, (a central point for dialogue among Bay Area new media producers were launched by Lambert and Atchley (White, 2010).
    • http://storycenter.org/timeline.html
    • (Microsoft Co., 2007)
  • IMPLEMENTATION
    • 1994-1998 - “ ‘Home Movies’ digital storytelling workshops created by Life on the Water lead Atchley, Lambert and and Nina Mullen (Lambert’s wife) to find the San Francisco Digital Media Center.
    • http://storycenter.org/timeline.html
    • (Microsoft Company, 2007)
  • CONFIRMATIO N
    • 1994 – Digital storytelling on was featured on CNN and MSNBC and the SFDMC collaborates with numerous organizations in England, Germany, and Denmark (White, 2010).
    • 1996 –The first Digital Storytelling Cookbook a hands-on production tutorial was published by SFDMC.
    • http://storycenter.org/timeline.html
    • (Microsoft Company, 2007)
  • THE S-CURVE OF DIGITAL STORYTELLING THIS S CURVE IS NORMAL BUT IT ACCELERATES AS TO THE MAXIMUM AFTER HALF OF INDIVIDUALS OF THE SYSTEM ADOPTS DIGITAL STORYTELLING AND INCREASES GRADUALLY BUT AT A SLOWER RATE. (Microsoft Company, 2007 )
  • THE DIGITAL STORYTELLING S-CURVE
    • The s-curve presents the dates of adoption by various organizations and the data reveals the adoption of Digital Storytelling does not fit the norm but does slowly increase over time. Some organizations adopted this innovations at the same time.
    1986 1988 2000 2002 Introduction Interactive Theatre International Projects K-12 Implementation
  • RATE OF ADOPTION
    • In an educational setting the diffusion of digital storytelling is at different rates .
    (Microsoft Company, 2007)
  • INNOVATORS
    • The innovator for digital storytelling in education is the Board of education who include digital storytelling and the Internet in the curriculum and instruction.
    • (Microsoft Company, 2007)
    • Early Adopters
    • The teachers use digital
    • storytelling in their
    • classroom.
    • Late Majority
    • The teachers that utilize
    • digital storytelling but only
    • because the other teachers
    • are already using the
    • innovation in the classroom.
    • (Microsoft Company, 2007)
  • EARLY MAJORITY
    • The teacher that utilize digital storytelling in the classroom as a part of instruction.
  • CRITICAL MASS
    • According to Rogers, critical Mass occurs at the point at which enough individuals in a system have adopted an innovation so that the innovation’s further rate of adoption becomes self-sustaining (Rogers, 2003). Critical mass is reached in education when teachers demanded training and attended more digital storytelling .
    • (Microsoft Co., 2007)
  • LAGGARD
    • The teachers that are set in their ways but will use digital storytelling in the classroom but only because it is required of them to use in the classroom.
    • (Microsoft Co., 2007)
  • PERCEIVED ATTRIBUTES
    • Compatibility:
    • Teachers adapting to using technology that are new to them.
    • Teachers really do not need difficult educational tools or
    • concepts .
    • (Microsoft Co., 2007)
  • PERCEIVED ATTRIBUTES
    • Observability:
    • The teachers that were in doubt when using digital storytelling
    • but become willing to at least try digital storytelling.
    • (Microsoft Company, 2007)
  • DECENTRALIZED DIFFUSION
    • In an educational setting of grades 9-12, digital storytelling would be diffused through a decentralized diffusion system. Rogers states that decentralized diffusion occurs when innovations originate from numerous local sources and then evolve as they diffuse via horizontal networks (Rogers, 2003). The 9-12 educational system may diffuse based on usage, adaptation and need
    • (Microsoft Company, 2007)
    • .
  • Key Change Agents
    • Rogers states that a change agent is an individual who influenced clients’ innovation-decisions in a direction deemed desirable (Rogers, 2003). Some key change agents maybe classroom teachers, media specialist, administrators and other school policy personnel who have adopted digital storytelling into the school system’s curriculum. These are adopters would have great influence over others in the school system to adopt digital storytelling.
    • (Microsoft Company. 2010)
  • CRITICAL MASS MET
    • In education critical mass has been reached for digital storytelling when in 1999 there was a demand for CDS annual workshops and training that was requested nationally and internationally (CDS, 2009).
  • The Champions of Digital Storytelling are:
    • Teachers
    • Students
    • Parents and family members
    • Community members
    • Microsoft Company. 2010
  • USING DIGITAL STORYTELLING IN THE CLASSROOM IS:
    • An effective way to engage students in their learning and as a medium that is relevant and meaningful to their lives through the use of computers.
    • (Microsoft Company. 2010)
  • Continued …..
    • An opportunity to use their ability to tell stories in a variety of
    • ways such as through sounds, music, graphics, photographs,
    • and original artwork as well as to express their creativity in
    • ways other than just text.
    • (Microsoft Co., 2007)
  • Continued …..
    • An opportunity for students to use and build planning skills,
    • organization skills, and time management skills.
    • (Microsoft Co., 2007)
  • DIGITAL STORYTELLING IS IMPORTANT BECAUSE IT
    • Helps to develop students visual and multimedia literacy.
    • Helps students to write effectively.
    • Teaches technology, information, and visual literacy as well as
    • encourages self-directed and self-motivated learning experiences.
    • Engages students in their learning .
  • THE NEED
    • Digital storytelling provide ways for students:
    • to be engaged and motivated.
    • to express themselves
    • to improve writing skills
    • to develop technology skills (Tech4learning, 2010.)
    (Microsoft Company, 2007)
  • WHY ADOPT DIGITAL STORYTELLING!
    • The Decatur County Board of Education should adopt
    • digital storytelling in it’s curriculum and instruction because of the
    • benefits it will provide to the students as well as to the teachers. It
    • is not very expensive because the school system already has the
    • technology available to put these stories together.
    • (Microsoft Company, 2007)
  • continued
    • The benefits of digital storytelling are that it can be used in
    • instruction in all subject areas and enhance students writing,
    • communication, planning, creative and organization skills.
    • (Microsoft Company, 2007)
  • Reference
    • Center for Digital Storytelling & Lambert, J. (n.d.). The Evolution of Digital Storytelling: An Abbreviated History of Key Moments During the First Sixteen Years (1993-2006)
    • Microsoft Company. 2007. Clipart.
    • Rogers, E. (2003). Diffusion of innovation. 5 th ed. New York: Free Press.
    • Tech4learning. (2010). Digital storytelling in the classroom. Retrieved from
    • http://www.tech4learning.com/userfiles/file/pdfs/Frames/digital_storytelling/ds_classroom.pdf
    • Tolisano, S. (2008). Longwitches blog: The magic of learning. Digital
    • storytelling . Retrieved from
    • http://langwitches.org/blog/2008/04/19/digital-storytelling-part-i/
    • Wikipedia. (2011). Digital storytelling. Retrieved from
    • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_storytelling
    • Wikipedia. (2011). Digital storytelling. Researchers. Retrieved from
    • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_storytelling#Development_and_pioneers
    • Wikipedia, (2011). Technological change. Retrieved from
    • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Technological_change