10 Information Processing Part3

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10 Information Processing Part3

  1. 1. INFORMATION PROCESSING <ul><li>Lauralee Flores, M.S. </li></ul>
  2. 2. PROTOTYPING
  3. 3. PROTOTYPING <ul><li>Fidelity – level of detail </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Low – many details missing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>High – similar to finished product </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Why use low fidelity prototypes? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Get feedback faster (cheaper) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Experiment with alternative designs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Easier to fix problems before time and money has gone into creating the product </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Keep the design centered on the user </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Quicker design iterations and releases – get to the solution quicker </li></ul></ul>
  4. 4. LOW FIDELITY PROTOTYPE
  5. 5. LOW FIDELITY PROTOTYPING <ul><li>Look </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Graphic Design </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Appearance </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Sketchy </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Hand drawn </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Feel </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Input Method </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Pointing, writing (different from mouse and keyboard if it is a computer application) </li></ul></ul></ul>
  6. 6. PAPER PROTOTYPING <ul><li>Overview </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Sketch out prototypes of the interface on paper (windows, menus, dialog boxes, etc.) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Potential users “walk through” task scenarios using the paper interface </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Interaction is natural </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Pointing with a finger = mouse click </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Writing or talking = typing </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>A member of the team plays “computer” </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Application </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Widely practiced in industry </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Surprisingly effective </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Helps people work together on a team </li></ul></ul>
  7. 7. WHAT YOU CAN LEARN <ul><li>Interface Issues </li></ul><ul><ul><li>What’s confusing to the user? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Where they have problems </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Subjective feedback on what users like and don’t like </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Conceptual Model </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Do users understand how to use and navigate the system? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Functionality </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Does it do what’s needed? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Missing features? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Nomenclature </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Are labels and other words confusing the user? </li></ul></ul>
  8. 8. WIZARD OF OZ PROTOTYPING <ul><li>Typically used with physical products (I.e., a refrigerator, a space heater, etc.) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Is used with computer applications when they are used to simulate future technology (speech recognition, etc) </li></ul></ul>

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