CREATING & FOSTERING EVENT EXPERIENCE<br />CACCE | Carolinas Association of Chamber of Commerce Executives<br />5.18.2011<...
This morning we’ll cover:<br />Back to the beginning: what inspired you to become an event professional?<br />Arts & Craft...
Disney’s Formula for Success<br />A quality guest experience + a quality cast experience + quality business practices =  T...
The Experience Economy<br /><ul><li>Work Is Theater and Every Business a Stage (Pine & Gilmore)</li></ul>The service econo...
WWWWW&H<br />WHAT is your vision for the event?<br />WHY are we having this event?<br />WHAT is the purpose of the event?<...
The Eight First Impressions<br />Look and messaging of marketing materials<br />Registration process<br />Getting to the e...
Thought . . .<br /><ul><li>Disney has its cast members (employees) assess situations based on “safety, courtesy, show, and...
American business focuses almost exclusively on the latter element, whereas Disney believes that if one doesn’t pay attent...
Planning Based on Collective Experiences and Lessons Learned<br />Can someone take over this afternoon?<br />Board members...
FREE Resources!<br />Successful Meetings Magazine (www.successfulmeetings.com) <br />Meetings & Conventions Magazine (www....
Katherine Swartz, CAE<br />Vice President, Leadership Development & Community Involvement, Greater Columbia Chamber<br />E...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Creating & Fostering Event Experience

1,141 views
1,041 views

Published on

Using success models presented in The Experience Economy (Pine and Gilmore) and The Walt Disney Company's customer service philosophies, event professionals can create event experiences with a focus on eight impression opportunities.

This presentation was prepared for the Carolinas Association of Chamber of Commerce Executives.

0 Comments
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,141
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
13
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
25
Comments
0
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Wht inspired you to get into the professionMickey mouse exercise
  • , the service economy emerged as the dominant engine of economic activity. At first, critics who were uncomfortable with the intangible nature of services bemoaned the decline of the goods-based economy, which, thanks to many factors, had increasingly become commoditized. Successful companies, such as Nordstrom, Starbucks, Saturn, and IBM, discovered that the best way to differentiate one product from another--clothes, food, cars, computers--was to add service.But, according to Joseph Pine and James Gilmore, the bar of economic offerings is being raised again. In The Experience Economy, the authors argue that the service economy is about to be superseded with something that critics will find even more ephemeral (and controversial) than services ever were: experiences. In part because of technology and the increasing expectations of consumers, services today are starting to look like commodities. The authors write that &quot;Those businesses that relegate themselves to the diminishing world of goods and services will be rendered irrelevant. To avoid this fate, you must learn to stage a rich, compelling experience.&quot;
  • Creating & Fostering Event Experience

    1. 1. CREATING & FOSTERING EVENT EXPERIENCE<br />CACCE | Carolinas Association of Chamber of Commerce Executives<br />5.18.2011<br />Presented by Katherine Swartz, CAE, Greater Columbia Chamber of Commerce<br />
    2. 2. This morning we’ll cover:<br />Back to the beginning: what inspired you to become an event professional?<br />Arts & Crafts Bonus Segment<br />Creating experience through . . .<br />WWWW&H identification<br />The Eight First Impression Opportunities<br />Beginning with the evaluation in mind<br />Learning from lessons and collective experience<br />FREE Resources<br />Your comments here . . .<br />
    3. 3.
    4. 4. Disney’s Formula for Success<br />A quality guest experience + a quality cast experience + quality business practices = THE FUTURE<br />The secrets of Disney’s success can be summed up as: <br />Legendary attention to detail <br />Exceed people’s expectations <br />Theme, theme, theme <br />Be guest-centered<br />
    5. 5. The Experience Economy<br /><ul><li>Work Is Theater and Every Business a Stage (Pine & Gilmore)</li></ul>The service economy is being superseded by the experience economy.<br />Services look and feel like commodities.<br />Expectations are increasing.<br />Experience is fleeting and short-lived. We have seconds to make impressions. <br />Successful companies focus on differentiating themselves.<br />We must “stage a rich, compelling experience.”<br />
    6. 6. WWWWW&H<br />WHAT is your vision for the event?<br />WHY are we having this event?<br />WHAT is the purpose of the event?<br />WHAT opportunities exist for collaboration and partnership?<br />WHO should attend your event? <br />WHEN is the best time to have this event?<br />WHERE is the best place to have this event?<br />HOW/WHERE will people hear about the event?<br />HOW will people feel at the event?<br />WHAT will they tell people about your event?<br />HOW can we borrow the wheel?<br />
    7. 7. The Eight First Impressions<br />Look and messaging of marketing materials<br />Registration process<br />Getting to the event<br />Greeting and welcome at the event<br />Meet and greet opportunities during the event<br />What happens during the event<br />End of the event – walking out the door<br />After the event<br />
    8. 8. Thought . . .<br /><ul><li>Disney has its cast members (employees) assess situations based on “safety, courtesy, show, and efficiency.”
    9. 9. American business focuses almost exclusively on the latter element, whereas Disney believes that if one doesn’t pay attention to all of these elements, including the first three, the fourth one won’t matter very long because you’ll soon be out of business.</li></li></ul><li>Planning with Evaluation in Mind<br />What questions will you ask at evaluation?<br />Attendees<br />Committee<br />Staff team<br />How will you be evaluated?<br />Ample and “best” notification of the event<br />Fair registration fees – value<br />Directions and parking<br />Creature comforts: food, temperature and restrooms<br />People: the right people, not enough, too many<br />Overall value: to the attendee, company, Chamber, community<br />
    10. 10. Planning Based on Collective Experiences and Lessons Learned<br />Can someone take over this afternoon?<br />Board members and VIPs<br />Media<br />Emergencies<br />Perpetual complainers<br />
    11. 11. FREE Resources!<br />Successful Meetings Magazine (www.successfulmeetings.com) <br />Meetings & Conventions Magazine (www.meetings-conventions.com)<br />Convene Magazine (www.pcma.org/Convene) <br />Association Meetings (meetingsnet.com/associationmeetings)<br />ConventionSouth (http://www.conventionsouth.com/)<br />Meetings Industry Forum on Google Groups (search MI Forum)<br />Deliver Magazine (delivermagazine.com)<br />
    12. 12. Katherine Swartz, CAE<br />Vice President, Leadership Development & Community Involvement, Greater Columbia Chamber<br />Executive Director, Columbia Opportunity Resource<br />Email: kswartz@columbiachamber.com<br />Telephone: 803.733.1123<br />facebook.com/katherine.swartz<br />linkd.in/KatherineSwartz<br />Twitter Handles:<br />@katswartz<br />@leadershipcae<br />@impactcolumbia<br />

    ×