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Build Sweat Equity in Your Organization Effective Young Professional Recruitment and Engagement Strategiespresented by: Katherine Swartz, CAECOR | Columbia Opportunity ResourceGreater Columbia Chamber of Commerce
Introductions Your name Your organization Why you are here It’s Sunday!
Today’s Outline WHY should you consider young professionals for volunteer and board service? WHO is a young professional? WHAT are their motivations? And what is a de-motivator? WHEN do young professionals have time to volunteer? (considering work-life balance, new families, etc.)  HOW can my organization effectively recruit and engage a YP? (or five!) HOW does my organization compare with others and what best practices can we take home from today’s attendees (sharing of BPs)? WHERE do I find young professionals, especially qualified young professionals for my board?
WHO and WHY . . .  Who do you consider a young professional? Why should you consider young professionals for volunteer and board service?
Defining the Generations 2011 Silver Tsunami Gen X, Latch-Key: increasing engagement during economic crisis; just as likely to volunteer as Millennials Echo Boomers, Millennials, Gen Y, 9/11 Generation, Facebook Generation Name crisis!?!?! Defined by Mobilize.org as 80 million people between the ages of 13 and 33 30% larger than Baby Boomers; three times larger than Gen X Billion-dollar industry of firms consulting on how to teach, lead and integrate this new generation Utilize their talents AND market toward them!
Source: Brookings Institute
Not all about age . . . Age/generation Years in the work force Years in a specific career field Years from graduating Self defined
BoardSource Nonprofit Governance Index 2007 Survey 2% of nonprofit organizations have board members under 30 years of age,  36 % of organizations have board members between the ages of 30 and 49 years of age.  These percentages are based on responses from 1,126 chief executives and 1,026 board members.
Quiz Time!
What value do younger generations add to your board? Passion for the mission Results-oriented thinking Access to new networks and donors Fresh perspectives on old problems All of the above
In the past, what has kept your organization from adding younger generations to its board? Skepticism about having younger generation on boards Uncertainty of where to find younger board members Preference for a “corporate officer” type on boards Concerns of isolation: Minority status as only YP; Lack of social connection or mentor All of the above Other:
How did you know that it was the right time to add younger generations to the board? Organization found the right person Organization serves and values Generation X and Y Organization values practicing what it preaches
Once on board, do you prepare or orient younger generations any differently? Same orientation for all board members Mentoring for YPs on their boards
What are the top skills or qualities necessary for a young person to add value to the board? Ability to think long-term Excellent communication skills Ability to work as part of a team or committee Connections to human and financial capital
If younger generations were added to the board, what three to five skills or qualities would the board need in order to work well with them? Training on how to work with younger generations Building respect and trust View Generation X and Y as leaders today Remember what it was like when you joined a board View younger leaders as assets versus threats
Recruiting & Motivating the Young Professional
We all want the same things! Access Advocacy Gathering place Connections: meet like-minded people Ability to make a difference Share ideas Grow professionally Know our opinions matter See that you are trying to meet my needs Validation: our support and contributions are valuable Recognition:  for people and work  - in the way I like to be recognized (ask me) Match the value you provide with the audience it is being offered to
Why serve on a BOD?
Attract, Recruit & Retain YP Board Members Provide value and benefits for the constituency Actively enhance their offerings for YPs Eliminate the token YP Don’t do anything different that you do with other generations: simply, tap the base Seek their opinions Give them an opportunity to rise to the challenge Provide board training Wade into donation requirement (but don’t eliminate it) Facilitate a mentor or buddy on the board
Common Programs Targets to Young Professionals Networking Functions Mentoring Connections Leadership Opportunities Career Advancement Resources Awards Programs Forums to share and submit ideas, feedback Q: What are you offering? Q: What programs can you offer: think exclusive and inclusive
Skills to help YPs learn More than knowledge of social media Express our feedback positively and respectfully Step up when leadership roles arise Approach situations with good intent Assert ourselves Prove that we are willing to do the work to make valid contributions Trust our organizations will continue to provide benefits and services to met our needs Soft skills
From the YP Perspective What skills and tips do you have for a Young Professional who wants to get a position on a Board? What assets or skills are essential for a YP or anyone to be successful on a Board?
Most important actions to take What are the most important actions Young Professionals (YP) can take right now to improve chances of being selected to serve on a Board? Volunteer on a committee within the organization Demonstrate leadership capacity being involved in other causes Network Build a relationship with the organization’s staff, Executive Director or CEO
Info needed! When serving on a Board or applying for a Board position, what kinds of information or advice is most helpful? Understand the roles and responsibilities of the Board and its members Learn the goals and vision of the organization and how the Board supports the mission Know your time commitment – what you have to give and what is expected of you Get a mentor from the organization
Success is defined by . . . What is the best way to learn how to be successful in your tenure on a Board?   Look for books or webinars on management and Boards Always ask questions to both staff and other Board members Review past minutes or historical records of the Board, to understand where the organization was and how they got where they are today Rely on other YPs on Boards or a mentor for advice
Tackling challenges ahead What is the number one challenge facing a YP who wants to serve on a Board? Learning how to communicate with other generations Believing that your experiences and points of view are equally valid and helpful Building your credibility with the organization and the Board Support of an Executive Director or CEO
Wanted: Assets, Skills & Experience What assets, skills or experiences are essential for you to be successful on the Board? Basic financial knowledge Policy experience Strong verbal and written communication skills  Passion for the organization and membership initiatives  Problem solving skills
Let’s make an immediate impact What impact can or do younger generations have on the Board of Directors?   YPs look at things differently and are often on the cutting edge of trends and seeing future possibilities.   YPs  can bring fresh, new ideas to the table They can help grow an association and keep it thriving with next generation. Because YPs are always “plugged in” they have their hand on the pulse of the constituency.
5 Ways to Attract Gen Y Members to Your Organization Email a short unscripted, authentic and personal video invitation to join your organization. Feature members in your communications who are in Gen Y and look like it. Publish candid photos of staff/volunteer leaders outside of the workplace. Use Gen Y's most trusted channels to communicate your message. (YouTube, Facebook, Twitter) Ask Gen Y members to create an unofficial handbook that offers an insider's guide to making the most out of membership/constituent. Source: Jason Ryan Dorsey
Other Ideas . . .  Community or statewide board service position directory Non-profit fair (Minnesota Rising PhilanthroFair ) Volunteer, committee chair, board director and executive committee trainings Dedicated YP position on your board (local YP organization nominates) Dedicated student leader position on your board (local student organization nominates) Push and publish information to local Chamber Leadership and United Way Blueprint (or comparable) programs Interview candidates with your current board
Focuses on young members Develops their technical and interpersonal skills Translates into strengthening and growth of SPE AND our industry Targeted to ages 35 and younger, with less than 10 years of experience Fifth facet focuses on innovation and creativity: capture new ideas and initiatives from YPs
Philanthopolgy (We are) codifying and having older grant makers articulate what they've learned . . . Emerging Practitioners in Philanthropy
Places to find YPs Chambers of Commerce, Leadership <<City>> and Local Young Professional Programs Leadership  and alumni associations of these programs Myrtle Beach: gsSCENE (gsSCENE.com) Columbia: COR (www.ourcor.org) Greenville: PULSE (www.greenvillepulse.com) Charleston: CYP (charleston-yp.com) Lowcountry : LYP (wwww.lypsc.com) Florence: YP Florence (www.ypflorence.com) Next Generation Consulting Directory of Organizations (wwww.nextgenerationconsulting.com)
Statewide Programs SCANPO: Shouldn’t we all be serving on boards? United Way’s Blueprint for Leadership The Riley  Institute at Furman (http://riley.furman.edu/diversity) Leadership South Carolina (leadershipsc.com) The State 20 Under 40, Greenville and Charleston have similar lists Sisters of Charity Foundation FMU Non Profit Leadership Institute Columbia College Leadership Institute Technical Colleges Student leader programs at schools across the state Urban Leagues and Community Relations Councils
Resources Avenue M Group: Attracting YPs to Your  Organization (http://www.avenuemgroup.com/pdf/whitepapers/Avenue_M_YP_Benchmarking.pdf) ASAE Decision to Join (http://www.asaecenter.org/files/Bookstore/summaries/DecisiontoJoinExecutiveSummary.pdf) National Conference on Citizenship (www.ncoc.net) SPE Best Practices (http://www.spe.org/twa/print/archives/2005/2005v1n2/TWA2005_v1n2_bestpractices.pdf) ASAE Great Ideas Conference BoardSource.org Nonprofit Board Basics (http://www.cpweb2.org/board/index.html)

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Build Sweat Equity in our organization

  • 1. Build Sweat Equity in Your Organization Effective Young Professional Recruitment and Engagement Strategiespresented by: Katherine Swartz, CAECOR | Columbia Opportunity ResourceGreater Columbia Chamber of Commerce
  • 2. Introductions Your name Your organization Why you are here It’s Sunday!
  • 3. Today’s Outline WHY should you consider young professionals for volunteer and board service? WHO is a young professional? WHAT are their motivations? And what is a de-motivator? WHEN do young professionals have time to volunteer? (considering work-life balance, new families, etc.) HOW can my organization effectively recruit and engage a YP? (or five!) HOW does my organization compare with others and what best practices can we take home from today’s attendees (sharing of BPs)? WHERE do I find young professionals, especially qualified young professionals for my board?
  • 4. WHO and WHY . . . Who do you consider a young professional? Why should you consider young professionals for volunteer and board service?
  • 5. Defining the Generations 2011 Silver Tsunami Gen X, Latch-Key: increasing engagement during economic crisis; just as likely to volunteer as Millennials Echo Boomers, Millennials, Gen Y, 9/11 Generation, Facebook Generation Name crisis!?!?! Defined by Mobilize.org as 80 million people between the ages of 13 and 33 30% larger than Baby Boomers; three times larger than Gen X Billion-dollar industry of firms consulting on how to teach, lead and integrate this new generation Utilize their talents AND market toward them!
  • 7.
  • 8. Not all about age . . . Age/generation Years in the work force Years in a specific career field Years from graduating Self defined
  • 9. BoardSource Nonprofit Governance Index 2007 Survey 2% of nonprofit organizations have board members under 30 years of age, 36 % of organizations have board members between the ages of 30 and 49 years of age. These percentages are based on responses from 1,126 chief executives and 1,026 board members.
  • 11. What value do younger generations add to your board? Passion for the mission Results-oriented thinking Access to new networks and donors Fresh perspectives on old problems All of the above
  • 12. In the past, what has kept your organization from adding younger generations to its board? Skepticism about having younger generation on boards Uncertainty of where to find younger board members Preference for a “corporate officer” type on boards Concerns of isolation: Minority status as only YP; Lack of social connection or mentor All of the above Other:
  • 13. How did you know that it was the right time to add younger generations to the board? Organization found the right person Organization serves and values Generation X and Y Organization values practicing what it preaches
  • 14. Once on board, do you prepare or orient younger generations any differently? Same orientation for all board members Mentoring for YPs on their boards
  • 15. What are the top skills or qualities necessary for a young person to add value to the board? Ability to think long-term Excellent communication skills Ability to work as part of a team or committee Connections to human and financial capital
  • 16. If younger generations were added to the board, what three to five skills or qualities would the board need in order to work well with them? Training on how to work with younger generations Building respect and trust View Generation X and Y as leaders today Remember what it was like when you joined a board View younger leaders as assets versus threats
  • 17. Recruiting & Motivating the Young Professional
  • 18. We all want the same things! Access Advocacy Gathering place Connections: meet like-minded people Ability to make a difference Share ideas Grow professionally Know our opinions matter See that you are trying to meet my needs Validation: our support and contributions are valuable Recognition: for people and work - in the way I like to be recognized (ask me) Match the value you provide with the audience it is being offered to
  • 19. Why serve on a BOD?
  • 20. Attract, Recruit & Retain YP Board Members Provide value and benefits for the constituency Actively enhance their offerings for YPs Eliminate the token YP Don’t do anything different that you do with other generations: simply, tap the base Seek their opinions Give them an opportunity to rise to the challenge Provide board training Wade into donation requirement (but don’t eliminate it) Facilitate a mentor or buddy on the board
  • 21. Common Programs Targets to Young Professionals Networking Functions Mentoring Connections Leadership Opportunities Career Advancement Resources Awards Programs Forums to share and submit ideas, feedback Q: What are you offering? Q: What programs can you offer: think exclusive and inclusive
  • 22. Skills to help YPs learn More than knowledge of social media Express our feedback positively and respectfully Step up when leadership roles arise Approach situations with good intent Assert ourselves Prove that we are willing to do the work to make valid contributions Trust our organizations will continue to provide benefits and services to met our needs Soft skills
  • 23. From the YP Perspective What skills and tips do you have for a Young Professional who wants to get a position on a Board? What assets or skills are essential for a YP or anyone to be successful on a Board?
  • 24. Most important actions to take What are the most important actions Young Professionals (YP) can take right now to improve chances of being selected to serve on a Board? Volunteer on a committee within the organization Demonstrate leadership capacity being involved in other causes Network Build a relationship with the organization’s staff, Executive Director or CEO
  • 25. Info needed! When serving on a Board or applying for a Board position, what kinds of information or advice is most helpful? Understand the roles and responsibilities of the Board and its members Learn the goals and vision of the organization and how the Board supports the mission Know your time commitment – what you have to give and what is expected of you Get a mentor from the organization
  • 26. Success is defined by . . . What is the best way to learn how to be successful in your tenure on a Board? Look for books or webinars on management and Boards Always ask questions to both staff and other Board members Review past minutes or historical records of the Board, to understand where the organization was and how they got where they are today Rely on other YPs on Boards or a mentor for advice
  • 27. Tackling challenges ahead What is the number one challenge facing a YP who wants to serve on a Board? Learning how to communicate with other generations Believing that your experiences and points of view are equally valid and helpful Building your credibility with the organization and the Board Support of an Executive Director or CEO
  • 28. Wanted: Assets, Skills & Experience What assets, skills or experiences are essential for you to be successful on the Board? Basic financial knowledge Policy experience Strong verbal and written communication skills Passion for the organization and membership initiatives Problem solving skills
  • 29. Let’s make an immediate impact What impact can or do younger generations have on the Board of Directors? YPs look at things differently and are often on the cutting edge of trends and seeing future possibilities. YPs can bring fresh, new ideas to the table They can help grow an association and keep it thriving with next generation. Because YPs are always “plugged in” they have their hand on the pulse of the constituency.
  • 30. 5 Ways to Attract Gen Y Members to Your Organization Email a short unscripted, authentic and personal video invitation to join your organization. Feature members in your communications who are in Gen Y and look like it. Publish candid photos of staff/volunteer leaders outside of the workplace. Use Gen Y's most trusted channels to communicate your message. (YouTube, Facebook, Twitter) Ask Gen Y members to create an unofficial handbook that offers an insider's guide to making the most out of membership/constituent. Source: Jason Ryan Dorsey
  • 31. Other Ideas . . . Community or statewide board service position directory Non-profit fair (Minnesota Rising PhilanthroFair ) Volunteer, committee chair, board director and executive committee trainings Dedicated YP position on your board (local YP organization nominates) Dedicated student leader position on your board (local student organization nominates) Push and publish information to local Chamber Leadership and United Way Blueprint (or comparable) programs Interview candidates with your current board
  • 32. Focuses on young members Develops their technical and interpersonal skills Translates into strengthening and growth of SPE AND our industry Targeted to ages 35 and younger, with less than 10 years of experience Fifth facet focuses on innovation and creativity: capture new ideas and initiatives from YPs
  • 33. Philanthopolgy (We are) codifying and having older grant makers articulate what they've learned . . . Emerging Practitioners in Philanthropy
  • 34. Places to find YPs Chambers of Commerce, Leadership <<City>> and Local Young Professional Programs Leadership and alumni associations of these programs Myrtle Beach: gsSCENE (gsSCENE.com) Columbia: COR (www.ourcor.org) Greenville: PULSE (www.greenvillepulse.com) Charleston: CYP (charleston-yp.com) Lowcountry : LYP (wwww.lypsc.com) Florence: YP Florence (www.ypflorence.com) Next Generation Consulting Directory of Organizations (wwww.nextgenerationconsulting.com)
  • 35. Statewide Programs SCANPO: Shouldn’t we all be serving on boards? United Way’s Blueprint for Leadership The Riley Institute at Furman (http://riley.furman.edu/diversity) Leadership South Carolina (leadershipsc.com) The State 20 Under 40, Greenville and Charleston have similar lists Sisters of Charity Foundation FMU Non Profit Leadership Institute Columbia College Leadership Institute Technical Colleges Student leader programs at schools across the state Urban Leagues and Community Relations Councils
  • 36. Resources Avenue M Group: Attracting YPs to Your Organization (http://www.avenuemgroup.com/pdf/whitepapers/Avenue_M_YP_Benchmarking.pdf) ASAE Decision to Join (http://www.asaecenter.org/files/Bookstore/summaries/DecisiontoJoinExecutiveSummary.pdf) National Conference on Citizenship (www.ncoc.net) SPE Best Practices (http://www.spe.org/twa/print/archives/2005/2005v1n2/TWA2005_v1n2_bestpractices.pdf) ASAE Great Ideas Conference BoardSource.org Nonprofit Board Basics (http://www.cpweb2.org/board/index.html)

Editor's Notes

  1. In 2009, America’s Civic Health Index ReportedPeople between the ages of 15 and 29 had the highest volunteer rate (43 percent), while their parents in the Baby Boom generation had the lowest rate (35 percent). 
  2. One option that has been floated to face this challenge is the creation of some typeof public service university or scholarship program that would be used as a recruitingand training ground for future diplomats, aid officials, treasury, homeland securityexperts, etc. So we asked the young leaders if they would be interested insuch a program, but with the proviso that “Much like the military academies,it would be free, but, in turn, require the graduating student to commit to serve inthe government for five years after their graduation, in the hopes that they wouldmake it a long-term career.”A remarkable 71% of the Millennial leaders responded positively. Acknowledgingthat these kids already have “the bug” of interest in politics and policy, the interestin such a program that would require such a significant commitment to governmentwork is still significant. It runs counter to the prior Generation X’s focus onlucrative career goals as well as the idea once expressed by Ronald Reagan that “The best minds are not ingovernment. If any were, business would hire them away.” At least for this generation, the best young minds, at least as so far determinedby their peers, are quite interested in desire the kind of public service work that molds and executes policy.The critical question that this data (and indeed the other survey results) poses is whether the current generation of organizations and leaders will be able to positively respond? Will these young leaders and the changes they embody ultimately be viewed as part of a crucial turning point in America’s history, or as a lost opportunity?
  3. With all the evidence of volunteer and engagement rates and with this impending tsunami
  4. 94% of respondents say they want be on Board. Learning moment as to what may have hindered them to getting on the board
  5. Board not representing diversity compared to what they are actually doing or seeking to do with member diversity.
  6. Communication: Face to Face Communication is still importantRemember not every Board member is computer saavyTechnology does not replace the personal touchFeedback loop is different on BoardsRespect and Credibility are EssentialConnections to nonprofit community or places where you need to sign contracts.
  7. Would you like Bill Gates on your board? The 20 year old drop out Bill Gates? The 40 year old Bill Gates. Missed opportunities.
  8. ASAE Young Professional Leadership Academy Collaboration with BoardSource®, Young Non-Profit Professionals Network (YNPN), Humanics, ASAE Young Professional GroupPassionGain opportunities for career development/enhancementOpportunities to grow and develop/refine leadership skillsNetworkingExpertise: financial, strategic, legal etcCharity: give backHands on governance learning; flip side of being staff to a board
  9. 30% of Generation X and Generation Y stated they have little to no contact with Executive staff at their association. Information was from a survey of gen x and gen y conducted by fellow members of ASAE class of 2010. Results were published in ASAE Associations Now in Feb 2011.
  10. # 1 in Questions posed to Executive Directors was Strategy followed by communications. Yps don’t differ on this than Executive Directors