Social Media: How to Engage Consumers and Build Brands

1,668 views
1,524 views

Published on

Crown B2C SOCIAL MEDIA MARKETING ASIA MASTERCLASS
November 2012, KL

Social Media: How to Engage Consumers and Build Brands
• How to innovate in emerging markets by localizing content to meet the needs of their consumers and how this can benefit you.
• The power of Facebook to create Brand SOV and how to engage in interactive content to enhance the number of times the company and its products are mentioned positively on the social web, compared to competitors - commonly known as 'Share of Voice'
• How you can build your fans and what's next
• Using social media marketing to drive consumers onto their social sites. Including how these new fans are then engaged into the brand through interactive campaigns

0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,668
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
611
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
46
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Social Media: How to Engage Consumers and Build Brands

  1. 1. SOCIAL MEDIA: HOW TOENGAGE CONSUMERS ANDBUILD BRANDSCase Study, Concepts, and DebatableIdeasKenny OngTakaful IKHLAS Sdn Bhd 1
  2. 2. Business Today… 13th April 2009 •Two Domino’s employees •YouTube •Apology from Domino’s after 48 hours •1 million hits •Twitter: questions on silence •LinkedIn: suggestions by users in forum 2 BusinessWeek, May 4, 2009
  3. 3. Guess Who?
  4. 4. TAKAFUL IKHLAS CORPORATE PROFILE• Shareholder : MNRB Holdings Berhad (100%)• Established Date : 18 September 2002• Operational since : 2 July 2003• Takaful Model : Al-Wakalah• Business Portfolio : General and Family Takaful• Number Products : More than 90• Number of Participants : More than 1,800,000• Number of Agents : More than 6,000• Number of Staff : 490• Regional Offices : 11• Paid Up Capital : RM295 million 5
  5. 5. IKHLAS Customized Healthcare Solutions Smart PartnershipsMedical WellnessAdvisory Program Board Cost Flexible Management 6
  6. 6. Menu1. Business Model and Strategy2. Social and Consumer Psychology3. Facebook4. What’s Next? Technical Details – I’ll leave it to the Specialists in the next 2 days 7
  7. 7. Business Model and Strategy And what this means to businesses today 8
  8. 8. “…in the past 18 months, we have heardthat profit is more important than revenue, quality is more important that profit, people are more important than profit, customers are more important than our people, big customers are more important than small customers, and that growth is the key to our success. No wonder our performance is inconsistent" CEO, Anonymous 9
  9. 9. What is the purpose of Marketing & Branding?Ultimate Objective of Marketing:“Get more people, to buy morethings, more frequently, at higherprices.”“Retention and Loyalty are useless ifNo Conversion is happening.” Sergio Zyman 10
  10. 10. What is the purpose of Marketing & Branding?“Retention and Loyalty are useless ifNo Conversion is happening.”“Communication is useless if NoConversion is happening.” 11
  11. 11. What is the Objective?1.Comm = Relationship (something like Dating)2.Comm ≠ Media glitz3.Comm ≠ ATL/BTL/BwTL/ArTL/FTL4.Comm ≠ CSR5.Comm = Get more people, to buy more, more frequently, at higher prices 12
  12. 12. Alignment: 4-Wheels Model Business PersonStructure Model Strategy Culture Leadership Resources 13
  13. 13. The McPlaybook* Make it easy to eat Make it easy to prepare • 50% drive-thru • High Turnover • Meals held in one • Tasks simple to learn hand & repeat Make it quick Make what customers want • “Fast Food” • Prowls market for new • Tests new products products for Cooking Times • Monitored field tests*Adapted from: Businessweek , Februrary 5th 2007 17
  14. 14. What is the Business Model?•Google•Tata Nano USP Market Profit Model Discipline 18
  15. 15. Business Model: USP“The Product is Not the Product”• What is the customer really buying?• What is the “Core Buying Purpose”? 19
  16. 16. Business Model: USP Unique Selling Proposition (USP) = Targeted Customer =Core Buying Purpose/ Customer Value Proposition/ Job To Be Done (JBTD) 20
  17. 17. Business Model: Profit Model RevenueAssets Cost Cash Margin Flow 21
  18. 18. What is the Business Model? USP MarketProfit Model Discipline 22
  19. 19. Market Discipline • Features, "They are the most innovative" Product Leadership Benefits "Constantly renewing and creative" • Limited "Always on the leading edge" Range Customer Operational Intimacy Excellence "Exactly what I need""A great deal!" Customized products Excellent/attractive price Minimal acquisition cost and • Solutions Personalized communications "Theyre very responsive" hassle • Preferential service and Customization • Cost Lowest overall cost of • Breadth & flexibility • Convenience ownership Depth Recommends what I need • firm""A no-hassles TCO "Im very loyal to them" Convenience and speed Helps us to be a success Reliable product and service 23
  20. 20. Market Discipline Product "They are the most innovative" •LV Leadership "Constantly renewing and creative" "Always on the leading edge"•Air Asia Operational •Ramly Customer Intimacy Excellence "Exactly what I need""A great deal!" Customized products Excellent/attractive price Personalized communications Minimal acquisition cost and "Theyre very responsive" hassle Preferential service and Lowest overall cost of flexibility ownership Recommends what I need"A no-hassles firm" "Im very loyal to them" Convenience and speed Helps us to be a success Reliable product and service 24
  21. 21. Alignment & Consistency: Market Disciplines Product Leadership (best product) Operational Excellence Customer Intimacy (low cost producer) (best total solution) 25Ref: The Discipline of Market Leaders, Michael Treacy & Fred Wiersema; 1995
  22. 22. Alignment & Consistency: Market Disciplines Product Leadership (best product) Operational Excellence Customer Intimacy (low cost producer) (best total solution) 26Ref: The Discipline of Market Leaders, Michael Treacy & Fred Wiersema; 1995
  23. 23. Alignment & Consistency: Market Disciplines Product Leadership (best product) Operational Excellence Customer Intimacy (low cost producer) (best total solution) 27Ref: The Discipline of Market Leaders, Michael Treacy & Fred Wiersema; 1995
  24. 24. Alignment & Consistency: Disciplines, Priorities, and KPIsOperational Product Leadership Customer Intimacy Excellence • New, state of the • Management by• Competitive price art products or Fact services• Error free, reliable • Easy to do • Risk takers business with• Fast (on demand) • Meet volatile • Have it your way• Simple customer needs (customization)• Responsive • Fast concept-to- • Market segments• Consistent counter of one information for all • Never satisfied - • Proactive, flexible• Transactional obsolete own and • Relationship and competitors• Once and Done consultative products selling • Learning • Cross selling organization 28
  25. 25. Alignment & Consistency Product Leadership (best product)Operational Excellence Customer Intimacy (low cost producer) (best total solution) 29
  26. 26. Alignment & Consistency Apple powerful Product Leadership products, premium (best product) pricing, limited range Still Doing well in HP well-balanced Acer super lean 2009/2011 portfolio, mass cost structure, aggressive pricing customizationOperational Excellence Customer Intimacy (low cost producer) (best total solution) 30
  27. 27. Alignment & Consistency: Business Model USP MarketProfit Model Discipline 31
  28. 28. Social and Consumer Psychology 32
  29. 29. What is the purpose of Marketing & Branding?Ultimate Objective of Marketing:“Get more people, to buy morethings, more frequently, at higherprices.”“Retention and Loyalty are useless ifNo Conversion is happening.” Sergio Zyman 33
  30. 30. PhilosophyLoyalty is Useless…• Virtual Consumption vs. Real Consumption 34
  31. 31. PhilosophyLoyalty is misleading…• Heavy Consumption ≠ Loyalty• Loyalty ≠ Heavy Consumption*Today’s focus is on Loyalty, not Consumption.*To increase consumption, refer Marketing 35
  32. 32. What is the Objective? 1.Comm = Relationship (something like Dating) 2.Comm ≠ Media glitz 3.Comm ≠ ATL/BTL/BwTL/ArTL/FTL 4.Comm ≠ CSR 5.Comm = Get more people, to buy more, more frequently, at higher prices 36www.myCNI.com.my www.OOBEY.com
  33. 33. Men vs. Women
  34. 34. Recession Generation 38
  35. 35. Color PsychologyCultural Variations; white remind us of something= marriage (western) = familiardeath (China). Purple = e.g. blue = calmdeath (Brazil) Yellow = Children = Brightsacred (Chinese) = Primary Colors e.g.sadness (Greece) = toys, clothes andjealousy (France) childrens books Red , Orange = Young = bold colors; to eat quickly and older = subtle palettes. leave carpeting to influence patterns of travel 39
  36. 36. Market Penetration Overview • “Crossing the Chasm” Resistant to taking up new product (prefer ‘safe’ route)1. Need to attract the 2. The Mass market will 3. If company does notEarly Adopter (willing follow once they see innovate or has weakto try) group first via early adopters joining retention plans,neutral and niche customers will leaveproducts 42
  37. 37. Target: Decision Chain Again: different type,Influencer different strategy Buyer User 43
  38. 38. Target: Customer Types Buy From youValue Swing Former Opposition 44
  39. 39. What does the Customer want? Product/Service Attributes Relationship Image 45* Treacy & Wiersema, The Discipline of Market Leaders, 1995
  40. 40. What does the Customer want? Operational Excellence: Quality and selection in key categories with unbeatable prices Product/Service Attributes Relationship Image Price Time √ Smart Selection √ Shopper Quality 46* Treacy & Wiersema, The Discipline of Market Leaders, 1995
  41. 41. What does the Customer want? Product Leadership: Unique products and services that push the standards Product/Service Attributes Relationship Image √ Time √ Best Function √ Product Brand 47* Treacy & Wiersema, The Discipline of Market Leaders, 1995
  42. 42. What does the Customer want? Customer Intimacy: Personal service tailored to produce results for customer and build long-term relationships Product/Service Attributes Relationship Image √ √ Service Trusted √ Brand √ Relations 48* Treacy & Wiersema, The Discipline of Market Leaders, 1995
  43. 43. Each Discipline Requires Different Priorities & ResourcesOrganization, jobs,skillsCulture, values,norms Operational Product Customer Excellence Leadership IntimacyInformation andsystemsManagementsystems 49
  44. 44. Each Discipline Requires Different Priorities & Resources Operational ExcellenceOrganization, •Central authority, low level of empowermentjobs, skills •High skills at the core of the organizationCulture, values, •Disciplined Teamworknorms •Process, product- driven •Conformance, one size fits all mindsetInformation and •Integrated, low cost transaction systemssystems •The system is the processManagement •Command and controlsystems •Quality management 50
  45. 45. Each Discipline Requires Different Priorities & Resources Product LeadershipOrganization, jobs, •Ad hoc, organic and cellularskills •High skills abound in loose-knit structuresCulture, values, •Concept, future-drivennorms •Experimentation and out of the box mindsetInformation and •Person-to-person communications systemssystems •Technologies enabling cooperationManagement •Rewarding individuals innovative capacitysystems •Risk and exposure management •Product Life Cycle profitability 51
  46. 46. Each Discipline Requires Different Priorities & Resources Customer IntimacyOrganization, jobs, •Empowerment close to point of customer contactskills •High skills in the field and front-lineCulture, values, •Customer-drivennorms •Variation and have it your way mindsetInformation and •Strong customer databases, linking internal andsystems external information •Strong analytical toolsManagement •Customer equity measures like life time valuesystems •Satisfaction and share management •Focus on ‘Share of Wallet’ 52
  47. 47. Target: Customer Types Buy From youValue Swing Former Opposition 53
  48. 48. Loyalty 2: SwingLoyalty = Best alternative at the current moment until I find another alternative Solution Strategy: Base Retention 54
  49. 49. Loyalty 2: SwingSwing Customers are “loyal” because:• Individual Relationships• Convenience (at that point in time)• Tied-up• Product Uniqueness• Promotions• No better alternative• Downlines• No known alternative• Psychologically lazy 55
  50. 50. Sample Strategies for ‘Swing’• Increase switching • Newsletters costs • Personalized alerts• Mega packages • Survey• Community • Suggestion Box• Reward programs • Switching Techniques (Points) (e.g. Balance• Membership Transfer of credit Subscription cards)• Email communication 56
  51. 51. The often overlooked, but moreimportant part of Social Media:SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY 57
  52. 52. Law of Human Nature # 1 The most powerful emotion – “FEAR”•The prospect of a loss has a greater impact ondecision making than does the prospect of anequivalent gain – “Prospect Theory” 58
  53. 53. Law of Human Nature # 2 The greatest desire of humans – the“Desire to be Important" •The interesting topic in the world – themselves •criticism = “lose face” = defense 59
  54. 54. Law of Human Nature # 3 There is no such thing as No Motivation•Everyone is motivated.•It is a matter of Positive or Negative Motivation 60
  55. 55. Law of Human Nature # 4ALL our decisions areemotional first, logical second 61
  56. 56. Law of Human Nature # 4 (a)We use ‘logic’ to defendour emotional decisions 62
  57. 57. Law of Human Nature # 5 Attitudes drive Behavior•Attitudes model attitudes•It is easier to change the attitude than behavior•Change the attitude, change the behavior 63
  58. 58. Law of Human Nature # 6 Humans have only two types of Thinking•Careful or Lazy – “Dual Process Theory”•Most people,most of the time, are in Lazy mode•Lazy Mode Influence: Cues•Careful Mode changes are more persistent•Careful Mode Influence: Relevance & Comprehension 64
  59. 59. Influence Weapons1. Comparison. When Others Are Doing It, You Should, Too. 1. We view a behavior as correct in a given situation to the degree we see others performing it 2. The greater number of people who find any idea correct, the more a given individual will perceive the idea to be correct. 3. We will use the action of others to decide proper behavior for ourselves, especially when we view those others to be similar to ourselves. 4. Examples: restaurants, looking in air, tv comedy, donation plate 65
  60. 60. Influence Weapons2. Liking. When You Like the Source, Do What Is Requested. 1. We prefer to say yes to the requests of people we know and like. 2. We automatically assign to good-looking individuals favorable traits as talent, kindness, honesty, and intelligence. 3. We like people who are similar to us. We tend to believe praise and to like those who provide it, often when it is probably untrue. 4. An association with either bad things or good things will influence how people feel about us. 66
  61. 61. Influence Weapons3. Authority. When the Source Is An Authority, You Can Believe It. 1. Humans by nature have a sense of duty to authority. 1. We are often vulnerable even to the symbols of authority as opposed to real authority e.g. titles, clothes, jewelry, cars. 67
  62. 62. Influence Weapons4. Reciprocity. When Someone Gives You Something, You Should Give Something Back. 1. We should try to repay, in kind, what another person has provided for us. 2. For those who owe a favor, it makes no difference whether they like the person or not. 3. This rule becomes less powerful as time becomes longer. 4. A person can trigger this effect even if it was an uninvited favor. 68
  63. 63. Influence Weapons4. Reciprocity. When Someone Gives You Something, You Should Give Something Back. 1. There is a strong cultural pressure to return a gift, even an unwanted one, but there is no such pressure to purchase an unwanted commercial product. 2. A small initial favor can produce a sense of obligation to agree to a substantially larger return favor – Unequal Exchange 69
  64. 64. Influence Weapons5. Commitment/Consistency. When You Take A Stand, You Should Be Consistent. – Salesperson: "Excuse me, but do you think that a good education is important for your kids?" – You: "Yes, of course." – S: "And do you think that kids who do their homework will get better grades." – You: "Yes, Im sure of that." – S: "And reference books would help kids do better on their homework, dont you think?" – You: "Id have to say yes to that." – S: "Well, I sell reference books. May I come in and help improve your childs educations?" – You: "Ahhh, wait a minute . . ." 70
  65. 65. Influence Weapons5. Commitment/Consistency. When You Take A Stand, You Should Be Consistent. 1. Once we make a choice or take a stand (commitment), we will encounter personal and interpersonal pressures to behave consistently with that commitment (consistency). 2. The more effort that goes into a commitment, the greater is its ability to influence the attitudes of the person who made it. 3. The commitments most effective in changing a person’s self-image and future behavior are those that are active, public, and effortful. 71
  66. 66. Influence Weapons5. Commitment/Consistency. When You Take A Stand, You Should Be Consistent. 1. A person will create his/her own new reasons to support and justify their choice even when the original reasons are taken away. 2. Involvement and Buy-in 3. E.g. Advertisement (Promotion) – Out of Stock 72
  67. 67. Influence Weapons6. Scarcity. When It Is Rare, It Is Good 1. Opportunities seem more valuable to us when they are less available. 2. People seem to be more motivated by the thought of losing something than by the thought of gaining something of equal value. 3. The more we are denied the freedom to have something, we more we want it – Psychological Reactance Theory by Dr. Jack Brehm. 4. We will find a piece of information more persuasive if we think we can’t get it elsewhere – Power of Secrets 73
  68. 68. Influence Weapons6. Scarcity. When It Is Rare, It Is Good 1. Things that can be scare: time, money, opportunity, physical7. Self perception. We learn about ourselves by observing our own behavior. 1. If we observe ourselves doing some thing then we reason that we must like the thing. 74
  69. 69. • SOCIAL MEDIA 75
  70. 70. The Unfortunate World of Social Media 76
  71. 71. The Unfortunate World of Social Media#1: By the time you master thetechnology, it’s already irrelevant 77
  72. 72. The Unfortunate World of Social Media#2: By the time your Social Mediastrategy is approved, it’s alreadyirrelevant 78
  73. 73. The Right Tools for the Job Personal (exp)Quality/Intensity of Communication Personal (info) Mass Traditional, In- home, Out-Of-Home Impersonal Mass Unconventional (info) Mass Online Individual Mass Reach of Communication 80
  74. 74. The Right Tools for the Job Personal (exp)Quality/Intensity of Communication Mass Targeted Conventional Personal Mass Targeted Online (info) E.g. Annual Reports, Analyst Briefings, IR Roadshows, IR Website Impersonal (info) Individual Mass Reach of Communication 81
  75. 75. The Right Tools for the Job Personal Contests (exp) One-on-OneQuality/Intensity of Communication Personal Individual Targeted Conventional (info) Individual Targeted Online Impersonal (info) Individual Mass Reach of Communication 82
  76. 76. The Right Tools for the Job Personal (exp)Quality/Intensity of Communication Personal (info) Impersonal (info) Individual Mass Reach of Communication 83
  77. 77. Things to note about Social Media• Social Media is not a Sales Weapon• Social Media is not a Media Weapon• Social Media is not an evolution of Direct Marketing• There is no Silver Bullet 84
  78. 78. So What’s the Use of Social Media? 85
  79. 79. Localizing Platform 86
  80. 80. Localizing Platform 87
  81. 81. Localizing Platform 88
  82. 82. Localizing Platform 89
  83. 83. Localizing Platform 90
  84. 84. The 36 Rules of Social Media
  85. 85. • FACEBOOK 92
  86. 86. Facebook: What Do You Want? • Share Of Voice (SOV) • Click-through? • Engagement? • Comments? • Followers? • Share? • Like? • Sales? Brand? Market Share? 94
  87. 87. Facebook for Business1. Simple Starts (for those starting out)2. A/B Testing on Facebook3. Edge Rank4. Facebook Ads 95
  88. 88. Facebook: Simple Starts 96
  89. 89. Gen Y Alphabet 98
  90. 90. Facebook: Simple Starts• Keep Your Updates Short – Blame it on Twitter – Sweet Spot: 100 characters• Let a photo do the talking – Photo Album - 180% – Photo - 120% More engagement – Video - 100% 99
  91. 91. Nice Photos, Short Sentences 100
  92. 92. • Don’t Use URL Shorteners (e.g. bit.ly) – URLs are not counted in the 100-140 character rule – A shortened URL does not indicate what type of website you’re taking them to – use a brand-specific URL shortener e.g. Victoria Secret: http://i.victoria.com/wSl 101
  93. 93. Simple Starts• Time your Posts – optimal time to post is between 1:00 pm and 3:00 pm – Links posted between 1 and 4 pm get the highest click-through rates – Links posted before 8:00 am and after 8:00 pm are less likely to get shared. – Engagement rates are 18% higher on Thursday and Friday – Engagement rates fall 3.5% below average for posts Monday through Wednesday – Saturday and Sunday posts get the most likes Stats from bit.ly and Hubspot 102
  94. 94. Simple Starts• Use the Right Words for Higher Engagement – “post,” “comment,” “take,” “submit,” “like” or “tell us” are the most effective – “winner,” “win,” “winning” and “events” will make fans excited – contest,” “promotion,” “sweepstakes” and “coupon” will turn them off. 103
  95. 95. Simple Starts• Ask Questions – “Where,” “when” and “should” –> highest engagement – “would” –> most likes – “why” -> lowest engagement, lowest likes – Yes/no: most responses; just seconds to answer. – Feedback – Emotional/provocative – Fun and fast: "Quick: ‘Batman or Avengers?" 104
  96. 96. Simple Starts• Video Teasers – Short -> one to three minutes at most – Ask a question. – Offer a quick tip – Upcoming event – Share a funny story 105
  97. 97. A/BTesting 106
  98. 98. Early A/B Testing: Website Designs 107
  99. 99. A/B Testing: Simple 108
  100. 100. A/B Testing: More Advanced 109
  101. 101. A/B Testing: Advanced 110
  102. 102. A/B Testing: Simple & Practical 111
  103. 103. A/B Testing:Facebook 112
  104. 104. Edge Rank Page Rank Edge Rank 113
  105. 105. Edge Rank• "Edgerank" algorithm - decides what content appears in News Feeds• On average, only 16% of company brand page posts are actually seen by its fans 114
  106. 106. Edge Rank Algorithm: How it Works• The closeness of the user to the brand -- or person, • The more your audience interacts with you, the higher their affinity score for you will be.• The weight of the content. • Ranks Comments and Sharing higher than "likes" because they require more action on the users part.• The time decay factor. • Measures the age of your content. If its older than other content, it doesnt get as high a score. 115
  107. 107. Edge Rank Algorithm: How To1. The more engagement the better: – Instruction or call-to-action – ask fans to share or "like" the content. – pose questions to spur comments2. Heavy-lifting interactions help a lot: – Drive fans to upload pictures, videos and engage in lengthy discussions – Video and photo contests can spark more interaction, as can simple calls for content. 116
  108. 108. Edge Rank Algorithm: How To3. Consistency is imperative: – Post content that drives the audience to react on a daily basis -- maybe even several times each day. –4. Content is king: – Write and publish great content. – Content so good fans have to share it 117
  109. 109. 118
  110. 110. 119
  111. 111. 120
  112. 112. 121
  113. 113. 122
  114. 114. What’s FB Useful For? 123
  115. 115. Closing Quote on Facebook
  116. 116. • What’s Next? 125
  117. 117. • What other stuff are more important to notice besides Social Media? 126
  118. 118. What’s Next?• Mobile• NFC• GeoMarketing (including LBT)• Gamification• Virtual Goods 127
  119. 119. Mobile 128
  120. 120. 129
  121. 121. NFC: Financial Product Innovation fromNon-Traditional Financial Players • M&A: bar code readers, inventory tracking, location-based deals • App: loyalty card, coupon, NFC, mobile payment at restaurants and cafés • eWallet (soon) • eWallet – in collaboration with Citibank, MasterCard, Sprint Nexus 4G 130
  122. 122. Find You…Technology + LocationSelf Targeting + Incentive = Call to Action 131
  123. 123. Location-based Social Media 132
  124. 124. Case Study: Placecast & Geo-Fencing • Geo-fencing — the act of drawing an invisible boundary around a given location and serving an opt- in SMS message when users enter boundary 133
  125. 125. Case Study: O2, Starbucks, L’Oreal • Six-month trial • Placecast’s geo- fencing technology • 1,500 areas offering deals. • Opt-in • Gender, age and general interests. • Receive Special deals 134
  126. 126. Case Study: McDonald’s, Facebook • Starting June 2010 • Check in while featuring one of the products, such as a Big Mac, in their activity feed • Geo-couponing 135
  127. 127. Case Study: Google, iPhone, Android • Location-aware mobile display ads • Incorporate maps for click-to-call • Ad-unit: expands into a full ad that includes a map overlay with the business pinned on a Google Map • Calls-to-action: “get directions” and “click-to- call.” 136
  128. 128. Gamification SPARX Developer: University of Auckland http://www.springwise.com/health_wellbeing/virtual-roleplaying-game-helps-teenagers-deal-depression/ 137
  129. 129. Gamification 138
  130. 130. Gamification 139
  131. 131. Gamification: Market Size 140
  132. 132. Gamification Leader Board (Ego/ Achievement) ActivitiesCommunity Rewards(Belonging) (Satisfaction) 141
  133. 133. Virtual Goods… $19.90 143
  134. 134. End Notes 144
  135. 135. Which Company?American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI)• 64 out of100-point scale: lower than IRS (Tax)• 2nd last among 30 companies surveyed• Lowest 5% among 223 companies surveyed• Bottom 5% of all measured private sector companies• 500 million customers 2010 American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI) E-Business Report 145
  136. 136. Which Company?American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI)• 64 out of100-point scale: lower than IRS (Tax)• 2nd last among 30 companies surveyed• Lowest 5% among 223 companies surveyed• Bottom 5% of all measured private sector companies• 500 million customers 2010 American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI) E-Business Report 146
  137. 137. Popularly Unpopular Popularity ≠ Affection 147
  138. 138. What is the purpose of Marketing & Branding?Ultimate Objective of Marketing:“Get more people, to buy morethings, more frequently, at higherprices.” Sergio Zyman 148
  139. 139. The Business of Business isBusiness, not Social Media 149
  140. 140. Thank You. soft copy of slides:http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable. blogspot.com/

×