Social Media Master Class

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  • Program outcomes: Guidance on developing an effective integrated social media strategy to support your missionPractical frameworks and guidelines for effectively developing an integrated content strategy and measurement practiceBest practices for effective use of common social media tools: Facebook and Twitter.
  • Number of Toolshttp://www.flickr.com/photos/ebarney/3348965637/sizes/l/Stay standing, listening to what saying about your brandStay standing, promoting your message Twitter, Share this buttonStay standing, participating Stay standing, content strategy for your social channels that is integrated, encouraging user generated content …Stay standing, if you have measurement and reflection strategyChallengesStrategyWe don’tNot linked to organizational mission orLack a plan on what to use it for.Content Strategy: Updating and putting only whats relevant on the web.Not having a strategy. We have dabbled but are not focused and do not have a good strategy around how and when we should use it.CapacityStaff and volunteer capacity is currently limited.Time to set-up and maintain the page.Our biggest challenge around using social media is learning how to create more visibility for our agency and programs using existing and new tools, while having limited financial and human resources.Choosing where to focus my energy on. Since small non-profits use a lot of student intern help, how do we chunk out the work so that we can assign tasks to these interns (and not lose control of it)Staff investment in carving out time for social media content.CultureUnderstanding how it can benefit the mission of the organizationDisagreement within the organization on the goals and purpose of adopting social media. Some people are eager to immediately adopt the latest technology, others are cautious.Resistance from executive leadership to use social media based on the risks involved.Lack of Measurement StrategyNo Measurement StrategyFiguring out where to invest timeLearning how to manage it effectively, involving/interesting our elderly clientsHaving time to effectively maximize the use of social media & knowing what are the best tools to utilize.What to post and how often to post.Figuring out whether it really makes a differenceMeasuring results from social media efforts.Updating content often enough - knowing how much is too much or not enough.Prioritization and/or ruling out non-critical stuffStaying relevant - making sure that what we post is valuable, posting frequently, and paying attention to "insights" - do they really matter? I have no idea!
  • Next 45 minutesWe’re going tell campfire stories ….Living Case Study: Remember that survey? There some amazing stories about smaller nonprofits reaping benefits from contests beyond the money and social media. So, your organization may be in this presentation! Pay attentionhttp://www.flickr.com/photos/codybadger/2072528071/sizes/l/in/photostream/
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/soyignatius/5544750526/sizes/l/in/photostream/The Parkinson’s Association is doing just that.   They have organized a fundraiser called “Summit4Stemcell.”  The goal is to fund non-embryonic stem cell research that will result in a treatment for Parkinson’s while inspiring people with the disease to move beyond their physical limitations.     A group of 17 passionate mountain climbers is raising money for this project by climbing Mt. Kiilimanjaro (19,340 ft high!) in September.You might be wondering why I’m writing about this?  It’s personal.My cousin, Rebecca Kanter (a millennial) is one of the climbers.   She is doing the climb in honor of my Dad who is suffers from Parkinsonism – there is no cure.    You can treat the symptoms and my Dad is working very hard on doing physical therapy which has allowed him to walk, with a walker.    Having been a competitive swimmer and surfer, he knows the discipline of working hard for a goal.  It was not unlike how he has worked hard as a doctor and in the Navy during WW2.Here’s why Rebecca is taking on this challenge Uncle Earl has Parkinsonism, and was in the hospital for his health-related issues. His family has since brought him home, but as my father described to me, they’re having to make adjustments to the house to accomodate my uncle’s physical challenges. Listening to the NPR report, especially the voices of the people (who I would later learn were Ken and Brad) taking on this enormous undertaking of sumitting Kilimanjaro while dealing with Parkinson’s, made me think about my Uncle Earl, the challenges he is facing in his life, and the opportunities — like summiting a mountain — that are no longer available to him. I was overwhelmed by the inspiration to do something.
  • It isn’t a nonprofit with an Internet Connection and a Facebook Profile …Networked Nonprofits are simple and transparent organizations. They are easy for outsiders to get in and insiders to get out. They engage people to shape and share their work in order to raise awareness of social issues, organize communities to provide services or advocate for legislation. In the long run, they are helping to make the world a safer, fairer, healthier place to live.Networked Nonprofits don’t work harder or longer than other organizations, they work differently. They engage in conversations with people beyond their walls -- lots of conversations -- to build relationships that spread their work through the network. Incorporating relationship building as a core responsibility of all staffers fundamentally changes their to-do lists. Working this way is only possible because of the advent of social media. All Networked Nonprofits are comfortable using the new social media toolset -- digital tools such as email, blogs, and Facebook that encourage two-way conversations between people, and between people and organizations, to enlarge their efforts quickly, easily and inexpensively.
  • The transition of how a nonprofit goes from institution to looking like and working more like a network is what our book is aboutThe transition isn’t an easy, flip a switch – and it happens – it takes time Some nonprofits, newer ones like Mom’s Rising have networked nonprofit in their DNA, while others – institutions – make the change slowly.Way of being transforms into a way of doing
  • Story of Electronics, an environmental-themed short film, as a case study and jumping off point for a workshop exercise to create a digital campaign. The Story of Electronics is part of a series of short films created and released by the Story of Stuff project since 2007.  The first film, The Story of Stuff, shows the devastating consequences of our (American) consumerism in the environment, developing countries, personal health and happiness.     The Story of Stuff site was created to leverage and extend the film’s impact by creating a network of people who are discussing the issue and hope to build a more sustainable and just world.   Their online network includes over 250,000 activists and they partner with hundreds of environmental and social justice organizations around the world to create and distribute the film, curricula, and other content.Last week at the TechSoup Global Summit, I had an opportunity to meet Annie Leonard and do a quick interview about their lessons learned working as a networked.  As I listened to her speak about their experience,   I knew this would be a terrific case study to share in Beirut as an example of working in a networked way.    Annie was kind enough to give me her notes so I could write this case study and hopefully, I’ve captured it correctly.The first thing to point out is that Story of Stuff project is not an independent nonprofit (as far as I could tell) and is fiscally-sponsored by the Tides Center.  This organization is one that was born as networked nonprofit, in part, because of the experience and vision of its leader, Annie Leonard.Here’s some basic points she made about working effectively in a networked way compared to working in a traditional organization.Source: Leadership for a New EraTo Be Successful You Need both A Network Mindset and Networking ToolsA Networked organization is more than just the electronic infrastructure and tools that facilitate communication.   It isn’t a matter of a Facebook profile or using Twitter.   It is a collaborative way of working.   It is about  sharing.   When you have a group of people working together in a network-culture and are facile with the tools, it can be unstoppable.She described the networked mindset as different from working in a conventional nonprofit institution.      These conventional nonprofits, what we label “Fortresses” in our book, The Networked Nonprofit,  are all about command and top down control.   Annie pointed out that these organizations have many rigid rules.   It means that no one on staff or the outside can do anything without permission and had to be done a prescribed way.  For example, everyone had to use the same font.What’s more she described how difficult this way of working is and makes it almost impossible to collaborate with other organizations working on similar issues.     In traditional organizations,  they approach activism as   “It is our issue.”   These traditional organizations feel that power comes for their expertise and their institution.In Networks, Information and Connections Flow in Many DirectionsAnnie talked about how networks focus on collaboration and action, rather than institution building.   She noted,  “In networks, the goal isn’t a big staff, but inspiring lots of people to do the good work through making connections and taking action.”    She also observed that in networks, power and decision-making propagates outwards – rather than being consolidated in the center.How and Why The Story of Stuff  Is Successful As A NetworkAnnie credits the above ways of working as the secret to their success.    She made the film because she was frustrated that the mainstream media and culture had ignored the underside of the American consumer economy.     When she posted the short film online in 2007, it exploded.   It turned up the volume on this important conversation.In the three years since the film has been out there, there are still 10K views a day and 12 million views online.  There are more than 220 countries have viewed the film in an unknown number of group settings.  It’s been translated into dozens of languages, inspired curriculum for high school, inspired a ballet in Boston, a puppet show in Palestine, floats in parades and the list goes on.  People have spray painted the URL on bus stops.Building RelationshipsAnnie suggests that one reason they were successful is that the film wasn’t just hers.  It was conceived and created in a network context.      Instead of doing everything herself, she engaged other people.   She spent an entire decade building relationships with groups all over the world and building a network of organizations to address the issues in the film.  She also got lots of feedback about the film while it was being created.When the film launched, it was already on the web site of hundreds of groups all over the world.    Hundreds of advocates and allies helped create it and had a stake in it.     She says it was “network-held” resource.Inspiring Others To Take Action: Credit Free ZoneAnnie also mentioned that their focus was to inspire new thinking and conversations, rather than getting credit or making money.    They used a creative commons license – allowing anyone to use their films, put them on their sites, and do anything they wanted except sell it.While Annie isn’t suggesting that we bury the old-school, centralized,  command and control model of organizing, she feels that different times demand evolving models.       Annie says working as network offers these advantages:(1)  Networks are more resilient and flexible and can bigger risks because they don’t have to worry about the longevity of a big institution.(2)  Networks are participatory.  They can get millions of people to help, not just paid staff.(3)  Networks offer many different ways to get involved.   It’s a buffet of ways to engage people that fits them.   Networks value people on whatever terms they want to participate.(4)  Networks are a reflection of where the world is going.    There’s a big paradigm shift in everything from our relationship to material goods to organizational models.   We’re moving from a “mine” to “ours” environment.(5) Networks make us all smarter.   By sharing information freely and welcoming input and feedback, learning is accelerated.    Networks evolve faster because of this.(6)  Networks are more fun.     Annie said that she had spent many years trying to get people to talk about the issues that she cared about, thinking her experience and expertise were enough.   It wasn’t until she learned to let go of control and shift from lecturing people to inviting them in that conversation exploded.As Annie said in her closing remarks,   the Story of Stuff is about building a better world.    In the story, the network is the hero.
  • To Be Successful You Need both A Network Mindset and Networking ToolsA Networked organization is more than just the electronic infrastructure and tools that facilitate communication.   It isn’t a matter of a Facebook profile or using Twitter.   It is a collaborative way of working.   It is about  sharing.   When you have a group of people working together in a network-culture and are facile with the tools, it can be unstoppable.She described the networked mindset as different from working in a conventional nonprofit institution.      These conventional nonprofits, what we label “Fortresses” in our book, The Networked Nonprofit,  are all about command and top down control.   Annie pointed out that these organizations have many rigid rules.   It means that no one on staff or the outside can do anything without permission and had to be done a prescribed way.  For example, everyone had to use the same font.What’s more she described how difficult this way of working is and makes it almost impossible to collaborate with other organizations working on similar issues.     In traditional organizations,  they approach activism as   “It is our issue.”   These traditional organizations feel that power comes for their expertise and their institution.In Networks, Information and Connections Flow in Many DirectionsAnnie talked about how networks focus on collaboration and action, rather than institution building.   She noted,  “In networks, the goal isn’t a big staff, but inspiring lots of people to do the good work through making connections and taking action.”    She also observed that in networks, power and decision-making propagates outwards – rather than being consolidated in the center.How and Why The Story of Stuff  Is Successful As A NetworkAnnie credits the above ways of working as the secret to their success.    She made the film because she was frustrated that the mainstream media and culture had ignored the underside of the American consumer economy.     When she posted the short film online in 2007, it exploded.   It turned up the volume on this important conversation.In the three years since the film has been out there, there are still 10K views a day and 12 million views online.  There are more than 220 countries have viewed the film in an unknown number of group settings.  It’s been translated into dozens of languages, inspired curriculum for high school, inspired a ballet in Boston, a puppet show in Palestine, floats in parades and the list goes on.  People have spray painted the URL on bus stops.Building RelationshipsAnnie suggests that one reason they were successful is that the film wasn’t just hers.  It was conceived and created in a network context.      Instead of doing everything herself, she engaged other people.   She spent an entire decade building relationships with groups all over the world and building a network of organizations to address the issues in the film.  She also got lots of feedback about the film while it was being created.When the film launched, it was already on the web site of hundreds of groups all over the world.    Hundreds of advocates and allies helped create it and had a stake in it.     She says it was “network-held” resource.Inspiring Others To Take Action: Credit Free ZoneAnnie also mentioned that their focus was to inspire new thinking and conversations, rather than getting credit or making money.    They used a creative commons license – allowing anyone to use their films, put them on their sites, and do anything they wanted except sell it.While Annie isn’t suggesting that we bury the old-school, centralized,  command and control model of organizing, she feels that different times demand evolving models.       Annie says working as network offers these advantages:(1)  Networks are more resilient and flexible and can bigger risks because they don’t have to worry about the longevity of a big institution.(2)  Networks are participatory.  They can get millions of people to help, not just paid staff.(3)  Networks offer many different ways to get involved.   It’s a buffet of ways to engage people that fits them.   Networks value people on whatever terms they want to participate.(4)  Networks are a reflection of where the world is going.    There’s a big paradigm shift in everything from our relationship to material goods to organizational models.   We’re moving from a “mine” to “ours” environment.(5) Networks make us all smarter.   By sharing information freely and welcoming input and feedback, learning is accelerated.    Networks evolve faster because of this.(6)  Networks are more fun.     Annie said that she had spent many years trying to get people to talk about the issues that she cared about, thinking her experience and expertise were enough.   It wasn’t until she learned to let go of control and shift from lecturing people to inviting them in that conversation exploded.As Annie said in her closing remarks,   the Story of Stuff is about building a better world.    In the story, the network is the hero.
  • To Be Successful You Need both A Network Mindset and Networking ToolsA Networked organization is more than just the electronic infrastructure and tools that facilitate communication.   It isn’t a matter of a Facebook profile or using Twitter.   It is a collaborative way of working.   It is about  sharing.   When you have a group of people working together in a network-culture and are facile with the tools, it can be unstoppable.She described the networked mindset as different from working in a conventional nonprofit institution.      These conventional nonprofits, what we label “Fortresses” in our book, The Networked Nonprofit,  are all about command and top down control.   Annie pointed out that these organizations have many rigid rules.   It means that no one on staff or the outside can do anything without permission and had to be done a prescribed way.  For example, everyone had to use the same font.What’s more she described how difficult this way of working is and makes it almost impossible to collaborate with other organizations working on similar issues.     In traditional organizations,  they approach activism as   “It is our issue.”   These traditional organizations feel that power comes for their expertise and their institution.In Networks, Information and Connections Flow in Many DirectionsAnnie talked about how networks focus on collaboration and action, rather than institution building.   She noted,  “In networks, the goal isn’t a big staff, but inspiring lots of people to do the good work through making connections and taking action.”    She also observed that in networks, power and decision-making propagates outwards – rather than being consolidated in the center.How and Why The Story of Stuff  Is Successful As A NetworkAnnie credits the above ways of working as the secret to their success.    She made the film because she was frustrated that the mainstream media and culture had ignored the underside of the American consumer economy.     When she posted the short film online in 2007, it exploded.   It turned up the volume on this important conversation.In the three years since the film has been out there, there are still 10K views a day and 12 million views online.  There are more than 220 countries have viewed the film in an unknown number of group settings.  It’s been translated into dozens of languages, inspired curriculum for high school, inspired a ballet in Boston, a puppet show in Palestine, floats in parades and the list goes on.  People have spray painted the URL on bus stops.Building RelationshipsAnnie suggests that one reason they were successful is that the film wasn’t just hers.  It was conceived and created in a network context.      Instead of doing everything herself, she engaged other people.   She spent an entire decade building relationships with groups all over the world and building a network of organizations to address the issues in the film.  She also got lots of feedback about the film while it was being created.When the film launched, it was already on the web site of hundreds of groups all over the world.    Hundreds of advocates and allies helped create it and had a stake in it.     She says it was “network-held” resource.Inspiring Others To Take Action: Credit Free ZoneAnnie also mentioned that their focus was to inspire new thinking and conversations, rather than getting credit or making money.    They used a creative commons license – allowing anyone to use their films, put them on their sites, and do anything they wanted except sell it.While Annie isn’t suggesting that we bury the old-school, centralized,  command and control model of organizing, she feels that different times demand evolving models.       Annie says working as network offers these advantages:(1)  Networks are more resilient and flexible and can bigger risks because they don’t have to worry about the longevity of a big institution.(2)  Networks are participatory.  They can get millions of people to help, not just paid staff.(3)  Networks offer many different ways to get involved.   It’s a buffet of ways to engage people that fits them.   Networks value people on whatever terms they want to participate.(4)  Networks are a reflection of where the world is going.    There’s a big paradigm shift in everything from our relationship to material goods to organizational models.   We’re moving from a “mine” to “ours” environment.(5) Networks make us all smarter.   By sharing information freely and welcoming input and feedback, learning is accelerated.    Networks evolve faster because of this.(6)  Networks are more fun.     Annie said that she had spent many years trying to get people to talk about the issues that she cared about, thinking her experience and expertise were enough.   It wasn’t until she learned to let go of control and shift from lecturing people to inviting them in that conversation exploded.As Annie said in her closing remarks,   the Story of Stuff is about building a better world.    In the story, the network is the hero.
  • SHABAKAT youth integrate information and communication technologies in the day-to-day lives of their communities to positively transform our families, education, businesses, environment and community. Rami Al-Karmi will share a few words.Founder and CEO of Shabakat, Al Ordon (JordanNet) and is serving as the E-Mediat Strategic Adviser for the Jordan In-Country Team shared some lessons about working as networked ngo. His organization’s name, Shabakat, translates into the word “network.”Shabakat Al Ordon trains young people in technical, professional and facilitation skills who then go out and create programs to train people in their communities. Rami shared how his organization works in a transparent way, open sourcing its program materials and processes. They also work many different partners to spread the program so that his organization isn’t doing everything. They’ve simplified and focused on what they do best.
  • http://www.bethkanter.org/emediat-day2/ounder and CEO of Shabakat, Al Ordon (JordanNet) and is serving as the E-Mediat Strategic Adviser for the Jordan In-Country Team shared some lessons about working as networked ngo. His organization’s name, Shabakat, translates into the word “network.”Shabakat Al Ordon trains young people in technical, professional and facilitation skills who then go out and create programs to train people in their communities. Rami shared how his organization works in a transparent way, open sourcing its program materials and processes. They also work many different partners to spread the program so that his organization isn’t doing everything. They’ve simplified and focused on what they do best.
  • http://www.momsrising.org/MomsRising is one of the best living examples of a nonprofit born as Networked Nonprofit, a  simple, agile, and transparent organization that work more like a network than a single isolated institution.   Like all Networked Nonprofits,  Momsrising values simplicity and the ability to leverage its network while engaging and building relationships with people and organizations to get results.It comes as no surprise that Momsrising embraces measurement and learning.  It is embedded in the way they work and their organizational culture. It has fueled their growth from zero members in May of 2006, to over a million active members—moms, dads, grandparents, aunts, and uncles—today! And, they do not count “likes” on Facebook as victory.   Instead, they identify key organizational results areas and associated metrics to define successes and failures.
  • http://www.bethkanter.org/momsrising-key-results/Their key results generally include:• increasing the movement size by increasing membership• garnering attention from all media through creative engagements• getting policies passed• working with aligned partner organizations• increasing capacity
  • They know that to get results they cannot solely rely on social media tools.  They use results as a guide for designing and implementing rapid responses as part of their multi-channel citizen engagement campaigns. They know how to gain attention in an age of media clutter and overload …. The importance of having an “integrated strategy” The media landscape today consists of four domains Traditional media …. (such as CNN, NY Times)Tradigital media … (includes mostly blogs with a lot of authority like the Huffington Post)Owned Media …. (this is your organization’s web site)Social Media … which includes social networks like Facebook, Twitter – increasingly being accessed on mobile devices What’s interesting is that the consumer does not make the distinction – they may get their news from reading a friend’s newsfeed or hear it on NPR or follow NPR on Facebook or get email alerts, etc.Momsrising has done a great job of this … they engage people and encourage them to share their stories – and they in turn share those stories through all four domains.
  • http://www.bethkanter.org/momsrising-key-results/Take for example how they responded over the summer to the ongoing budget negotiations, when  tens of billions of dollars in cuts to Medicaid and Medicare were put on the table.Momsrising wanted to demonstrate to Congress that there was a grassroots constituency that supported Medicaid and dispel a misperception that while Medicare has a strong constituency, Medicaid did not.
  • Momsrising knows from years of message testing and research, that to change minds about an issue, wonky stats fall flat.   But stories resonate.   They identified a rapid response goal of getting the stories dozens of moms who benefited from Medicaid and who could put out a strong defense for the program in the media.Using a story collection landing page on their site, they urged their members to share their stories.   They collected over 500 stories from 43 states about how Medicaid was helping families.   They curated the best ones that illustrated their message and re-purposed these stories in to all their action alerts across channels.  This generated over 100,000 letters to Congress about the debt ceiling and the importance of Medcaid.
  • http://www.bethkanter.org/momsrising-key-results/
  • http://www.bethkanter.org/momsrising-key-r esults/https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10150249212856610&set=a.10150249212851610.322274.8321461609&type=1Masters of the multi-channel approach, Momsrising’s other tactics included hand delivering “story books”, hard copy compilations of the stories to Congress and the White House.  
  • http://www.bethkanter.org/momsrising-key-r esults/Notes Kristen, “Social Media channels like Twitter and Facebook are important to us because we share those stories directly with targeted members of Congress. We post specific stories on targeted legislator’s Facebook Walls or we @reply them on Twitter. We’ve found that there are less filters between us and Congress when we use social media channels. While they can easily ignore our emails and phone calls, sharing the story directly with them through social media channels – they have to respond.”   Recent studies have shown that 64% of  Congressional offices use social media to gauge public opinion.)Another key result area is to bring about policy change to create a more family-friendly nation.  Last month, Momsrising was invited tobring moms to the White House to talk with policy staff about their experience with Medicaid.   The White House  blogged about power of people’s stories.
  • They also place these stories as letters to the editors in traditional newspapers.  
  • As a Networked Nonprofit, they understand  simplicity and have not built a complex nonprofit with its own policy department.   Momsrising  focuses on what they do best – outreach and organizing moms – but not in isolation.   Momsrising  works with dozens of advocacy groups to extend their network without pulling themselves off task. Kristin said, “Our expertise is in working with our moments and powering the movement.  We don’t go out on anything solo, we rely on partners for policy analysis and many other things.”
  • The process of setting key results and collecting key metrics to measure progress is only half the battle.   It is the process using the data to make decisions and getting member feedback.Momsrising holds a weekly staff meeting nicknamed “Metrics Monday.”   Each program and campaign staff person reviews their reports in preparation for a group conversation about what actions to reinforce, how refine messages, and other improvements.    Says Kristin, “Our dashboards have multiple views – a high level view and the ability to drill down into specific campaigns – this informs our discussion.”An important part of the mix is the use of member feedback – both qualitative and surveys. “We are in dialogue with our members to figure out what works, what doesn’t.   The metrics keep us focused on our mission of building a movement for family economic security, while listening and engaging with our members breathes life into our movement.”  As a Networked Nonprofit, they understand the importance of learning loops when working a rapid response environment.
  • Momsrising also understands that learning leads to success.Fail: Some experiments bomb.    Momrising staff gives themselves permission to kill each other’s projects  or tactical ideas that were brilliant at the time but simply don’t work.  They do this with humor to remove the failure stigma and call it a “Joyful Funeral”  Before they bury the body, they reflect on why it didn’t work. Any staff person can call a Joyful Funeral on anyone else’s idea.Incremental Success Is Not A Failure: They do a lot of experiments and set realistic expectations for success.   Many times victories happen in baby steps.   They know from experience that many of their campaigns that incorporate social media lead to incremental successes, small wins or small improvements.Soaring Success:     Some experiments, actions, or issues will see dramatic results – beyond the organization’s wildest dreams.   For example, an interactive educational video ended up garnering over 12 million views and hundreds of comments and lead to thousands of new members signing up or taking action. Kristen says, “That type of success does not happen every day, but we need to try for that kind of success every day. We can only do it if we kill things that don’t work.”  They also analyze game changing successes to make sure it can be replicated or wasn’t an accident
  • KSW's mission is to produce, present, and promote art that empowers Asian American artists and communities.
  • PhotosWorked: Showing our faces, looking behind-the-scenesDidn’t Work: Posting on evenings/weekends, links to event albumsAH-HA! Our FB page needed a personality makeover; we needed to be ourselves QuestionsWorked: Fun, easy to answer questions that tapped into our fans’ expertiseDidn’t Work: Anything too personal and open-ended questions.AH-HA! We needed to engage our audience in a two-way conversation PartnershipsWorked: Mutually supporting another page, using that page as a source of contentDidn’t Work: Last-minute giveawaysAH-HA! Partnering with another org can expand our audience and provide interesting content. OtherMultiple posts per dayWeekly editorial calendaringCommenting on other pagesTaggingEnlisting board members to invite friends (result: +40 fans)
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/7438870@N04/1709710149/
  • How many of you remember those questions on the registration form for the event? We’re going to use the answers to create some living case studies …http://www.flickr.com/photos/nep/2284817865/
  • If you can’t fly then run, if you can’t run then walk, if you can’t walk then crawl, but whatever you do you have to keep moving forward.”
  • http://samaritanhouse.com/new/home/index.shtmlhttp://twitter.com/#!/Samaritan_Househttps://www.facebook.com/samaritanhouse.smc
  • www.compasspoint.orghttps://www.facebook.com/compasspoint
  • http://www.felidaefund.org/https://twitter.com/#!/FelidaeFundhttps://www.facebook.com/felidaefund
  • http://www.oraminternational.org/http://twitter.com/#!/ORAMrefugeehttps://www.facebook.com/ORAMrefugeehttp://www.youtube.com/user/ORAMRefugee
  • Only strong alignment was CompassPoint
  • How do you get started?http://www.flickr.com/photos/ryanobjc/2712391135/
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/17657816@N05/1971826491/sizes/l/in/photostream/ResultsIncrease website traffic by 25% by adding social media content starting posting by November 1, 2012. Acquire 100 new donors through Facebook Causes by June 30, 2012Increase email list sign ups through social media channels by 500 names by June 30, 2012Increase the number of gallery visitors who purchase (in person or online) by 20% by June 30, 2012Increase online and print mentions by 25% by June 30, 2012Increase enrollment in classes and workshops by 50% by June 30, 2012Increase exhibition visitors by 15% by June 30, 2012TacticalIncrease audience connections through Facebook to 1000 by June 1, 2012.Increase our month to month Post Feedback on Facebook by 25% on average.Increase mentions by 20% on Twitter before, during, and after performances for 2011Increase views on YouTube Channel by 50% by January, 2012Increase number of retweets and @replies on Twitter by 20% by September, 30, 2011Recruit 40 organizations to join our LinkedIn organization page by June 30, 2012Increase web site traffic from Facebook by 20% by September 30, 2012Utilize Facebook to increase Festival attendance and online program views by 5% by September 2011Identify top 25 influencers on Twitter to build relationships to help blog, repost, and spread the word about online program by September, 30, 2012Increase the age/ethincity/gender/income/geographic of Facebook fans by 20% by June 30, 2012CapacityCreate video trailers for all productions garnering an average of 100 views per trailer for the 2011-2012 programs.Integrate social media across organization staff and departments to use it reach goals by 2012Conduct an audience survey to determine where to expand, grow, and diversify social media presence for 2012Create one video per month to tell stories about the impact of our organization by January, 2012.Recruit 40 organizationStaff members in membership, fundraising, communications, and marketing departments will use social media tools to engage audiences on Facebook page 3 times per week.Conduct surveys at the end of every class and workshop to gather important audience social media usage data and experience with program by June 2012Enhance visual storytelling capacity and diversify type of content shared with a goal increasing videos by 10%, photos by 20% photographic and text that stimulates comments by 20% by August 1, 2012 Create a presence and support active fans on social fundraisings Jumo, Crowdrise, and Change.org by September 30, 2012Create a system to collect, aggregate, and share user generated content on social media by audiences by September 30, 2012
  • How do you get started?http://www.flickr.com/photos/ryanobjc/2712391135/
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/yandle/844341197/Lay out all planned communication and marketing events and opportunities for the year and determine which ones you want to socialize …
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/striatic/107910471/This was all in the worksheet on the wiki, but did you have a meeting to discuss the pilot? What happened?
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/24443965@N08/3639694353/
  • CompassPoint has a policy. It is:1. Your personal account on Facebook, Twitter, or any other social media channel is your personal account and we will not regulate or censor it in any way. That said, we do encourage staff to exercise common sense and good judgment in your interactions and posts. 2. Staff are not required to have personal Facebook or Twitter accounts for CompassPoint use. And, unless you are interested, staff are not expected to write posts for CompassPoint’s corporate Facebook and Twitter accounts, though in communications planning for your projects you may be asked to provide input on appropriate timing/ opportunities/ subjects for Facebook and Twitter posts.3. We strive to live out our pursuit of social equity and multicultural values by proactively reflecting and seeking out diverse resources and social media partners (e.g., bloggers, twitter feeds to follow, etc.). For instance, we are following/engaged with numerous social equity organizations and diverse nonprofit leaders...
  • http://measure-netnon.wikispaces.com/file/view/CFSCC_SocialMediaPolicy_08%2017%2011.pdf
  • http://measure-netnon.wikispaces.com/file/view/CFSCC_SocialMediaPolicy_08%2017%2011.pdf
  • Trust is cheaper than controlTell story
  • It is a good idea to have some formal community participation guidelines for the Facebook which are similar to online community guidelines. These can be a brief and simple reminder about civility and respect and deleting in appropriate comments.
  • “We used social media to spread the word about a special artist performing on the National Mall. Using Twitter, we started the campaign the night prior to the 'free" concert. and sent tweet all morning long. Folks from from North Carolina, Pennsylvania and New York to see Trombone Shorty and a tribute to New Orleans. We had 60,000 on the Mall that day. It was incredible.”http://dcjazzfest.org/https://www.facebook.com/dcjazzfesthttp://twitter.com/#!/dcjazzfest
  • This is an example I heard the other idea from GristThey are online news site for environmental issues – anyone familiarGetting to running
  • As soon as I landed, I was able to check the conference dashboard and find out what you all were talking about yesterday …
  • Monitors, listens, and researches the people in their networkLearn from experience and data
  • Amy Boroff (@njdevmgr), development manager for Junior Achievement of NJ in Princeton [emphasis added], discovered one of her new Twitter followers was Kate Specchio (@ecsfoundation), co-founder of Morris County-based The Emily C. Specchio Foundation. Through their tweets, Amy recognized the potential for working together. They continued to communicate on Twitter in real-time, after working hours, to learn more about each respective organization. After several weeks, JANJ submitted a proposal to ECS for funding for an inaugural event: the Women's Future Leadership Forum. The ECS Foundation accepted the proposal and granted funds to help support aspiring female high school students become future leaders.
  • A few of Ayres’ big ideas:Start with a group of your most passionate fans. When IHG launched its community, instead of opening it up to the world, it started with Priority Rewards Club members. These were frequent customers of the brand who were eager to get involved and give feedback.Ask for feedback, and show customers when you use it. Ayres and his team regularly ask the community for ideas, content and even “gut checks” on campaigns before they launch. They use this feedback to tweak what they’re doing and follow up with the community on the result — which in turn drives even more engagement.Start somewhere, not somewheres. Ayres recommended getting started in social media by focusing on one challenge, idea or opportunity. Because IHG started with a small group focused on a few key metrics, the company learned a ton and has momentum and internal support to try the next big thing.
  • USA for UNHCR  is a 501(c)(3) headquartered in Washington, D.C. They raise funds and awareness in the United States for the lifesaving work that more than 6,000 staffers of Geneva-based UNHCR undertake for refugees around the world, 24/7.   USA for UNHCR created the Blue Key campaign as a way to drive awareness of this global issue in the US. The $5 blue key pin or pendant symbolizes the one thing most of us have and that refugees don’t: a key to their own home.
  • The Blue Key site was only launched in December 2010, and its social/digital aspects were relatively new, so there was not a lot of data to base KPIs on. Overall, when we went into the first phase of the campaign, we had two goals: to secure at least three Blue Key Champions, and  to get 6,000 keys ordered between May 9 and June 20 (World Refugee Day).These goals were important to USA for UNHCR first, because the entire Blue Key campaign revolves around more people purchasing keys, and second, because with a limited budget for traditional outreach, we relied on willing bloggers to help us get the word out.
  • The Twitter chart looks at the impact of a “tweetathon” we decided to hold on June 13; one week before World Refugee Day (June 20). Several Champions signed up to “staff” tweeting about the refugee crisis and #bluekey (the campaign hashtag) from 9 a.m. – 9 p.m. ET that day, in shifts. In addition, RoyaHosseini, who manages theKhaledHosseini Foundation’s Twitter account, signed on as a “special guest” between 1 & 2 p.m. (KhaledHosseini is the author ofThe Kite Runner.)All told, there was a 169% increase in web traffic that day, compared to the previous high point a few weeks prior. We get real time confirmations every time someone orders a key, so we knew it was working. Finally, via campaign URLs in Google Analytics, we saw that Twitter was the main driver of traffic (for May 9 – June 20). This was not the case before the tweetathon.
  • Masters of relationship marketing
  • Bruce Lesley is one of a growing number of  nonprofit executive directors and senior leaders that use Twitter.  And, he isn’t tweeting about what he ate for breakfast or one of his personal passions, basketball.   He uses Twitter to curate information related to his organization’s mission and work as a bipartisan advocacy organization dedicated to making children and families a priority in federal policy and budget decisions.   He also uses content curation for sources for his guest blogging.     His use of Twitter (and his organization’s use of Twitter and all communications channels for that matter) serve this intent:First Focus is working to change the dialogue around children’s issues by taking a cross-cutting and broad based approach to federal policy making. In all of our work, we seek to raise awareness regarding public policies impacting children and ensure that related programs have the resources necessary to help them grow up in a healthy and nurturing environment.If you take a look at Bruce Lesley’s Twitter stream, you will see that he is curating information on public policies impacting children.   Bruce does his own curating, using Google Reader and FlipBoard.   Any individual or nonprofit organization can curate information using these tools.  They can make it strategic by linking the information to their mission.   But what is the secret sauce to doing it well?
  • Bruce Lesley is one of a growing number of  nonprofit executive directors and senior leaders that use Twitter.  And, he isn’t tweeting about what he ate for breakfast or one of his personal passions, basketball.   He uses Twitter to curate information related to his organization’s mission and work as a bipartisan advocacy organization dedicated to making children and families a priority in federal policy and budget decisions.   He also uses content curation for sources for his guest blogging.     His use of Twitter (and his organization’s use of Twitter and all communications channels for that matter) serve this intent:First Focus is working to change the dialogue around children’s issues by taking a cross-cutting and broad based approach to federal policy making. In all of our work, we seek to raise awareness regarding public policies impacting children and ensure that related programs have the resources necessary to help them grow up in a healthy and nurturing environment.If you take a look at Bruce Lesley’s Twitter stream, you will see that he is curating information on public policies impacting children.   Bruce does his own curating, using Google Reader and FlipBoard.   Any individual or nonprofit organization can curate information using these tools.  They can make it strategic by linking the information to their mission.   But what is the secret sauce to doing it well?
  • To get from walking – to power walking, maybe even jogging –You need a ladder of engagement, consumer decision-journey or well thought out marketing funnelDifference for different goals and organizations ..But having a ladder – helps you understand what messaging, tactics you need to move people through – and when you add measurement to the mixHelps you really understand what is working ….Explain what we are seeing here
  • So I wanted to walk you through a few experiments we have been doing—specifically on Twitter.The first was based on a piece that Tom Philpott wrote about all of the horrific things in soda. We saw huge traction on this story and decided to jump on an opportunity.So within less than 24 hours we convened a twitter chat.I am sure most of you heard about the Obama twitter chat at the beginning of the month—basically they revolve around a hashtag where people can tweet questions, answers, comments. The cool thing is when people tweet to this hashtag, it shows up in their feed. So all of their followers see it and can get hooked into the content—it creates a resonance that doesn’t happen as easily via email, etc. So with a few hundred tweets to this chat, we actually reached 100s of thousands of people.
  • From that we decided to take the time to plan a more intentional chat around a series we were presenting about the economics of biking.We took the time to promote this chat more widely over a period of about a week. And we saw great results.Once of the best parts of this example is this hashtag is still being used by people and to tag content unrelated to Grist . So we are getting this core idea out there.We don’t control the messaging anymore and you have to be comfortable with that.
  • Fun example.
  • Social Media Master Class

    1. Effective Social Media Strategy and Powerful Tactics for Networked Nonprofits<br />Compasspoint<br />October 19, 2011<br />
    2. Workshop Goals: <br /><ul><li>Guidance on developing an effective integrated social media strategy to support your mission
    3. Practical frameworks and guidelines for effectively developing an integrated content strategy and measurement practice
    4. Best practices for effective use of common social media tools: Facebook and Twitter.</li></li></ul><li>Rock Star Workshop Leaders<br />
    5. Effective Social Media Strategy and Powerful Tactics<br />AGENDA<br />TIMES<br />ACTIVITIES<br />ROLES<br />9:00Welcome and Networking<br /> 9:30Part 1: Networked Nonprofits Campfire Stories<br />10:30Break<br />10:45Part 2: Networked Nonprofits 8 Effective Habits<br />12:00Lunch<br />1:00Mini-Workshops<br />Content, Facebook<br /> 2:30Break<br />2:45Mini-Workshops<br />Twitter, Measurement<br />4:15Break<br />4:30Closing<br />Morning is about Networked Nonprofits, Strategy, networking, and self-assessment<br />Afternoon is about the tactical and practical<br />OUTCOMES<br /><ul><li>Leave the room with a direction towards developing an integrated strategy
    6. Have some frameworks and tips about developing a content and measurement strategy
    7. Tips and techniques for Facebook and Twitter</li></ul>RULES<br /><ul><li>Everyone Participate/ No One Dominate
    8. Learning from adjacent practices
    9. Build on Each Others Ideas
    10. Have Fun!</li></li></ul><li>What tools?<br />60% track what people are saying<br />25% have blog<br />50% have YouTube<br />92.9% have Facebook<br />81.8% have Twitter<br />
    11. Part 1: We’re going share some campfire stories …<br />
    12. Networked Nonprofits<br />
    13. Walking is like climbing a mountain<br />
    14. “When the technology becomes boring, it becomes socially interesting” – Clay Shirky<br />The connectedness of living in a networked, mobile world has become more a part our daily lives. <br />These disruptive technologies are having a profound impact on the way nonprofits do their work, communicate with stakeholders, and deliver programs.<br />Remember: Disruption is can be our friend ….. <br />
    15. Networking Exercise: Social Networking Campfire Stories <br />How are online social networks impacted in your personal life? What’s different in the way that you connect with friends, family, and colleagues now compared to 5 years ago?<br />How are online social networks changing or have changed the way your nonprofit does it work, delivers programs, fundraises, or communicates with stakeholders?<br />What, if anything, is different about your organization connects and interacts with stakeholders through the web now compared to five years ago?<br />Find a person in the room from another organizationand share the answers to the above questions.<br />
    16. What is a Networked Nonprofit?<br />
    17. The Networked Nonprofit <br />
    18. In the three years since the film has been out there, there are still 10K views a day and 12 million views online. <br />People in 220 countries have viewed the film in an unknown number of group settings.  <br />Translated into dozens of languages, inspired curriculum for high school, inspired a ballet in Boston, a puppet show in Palestine.<br />
    19. To Be Successful You Need both A Network Mindset and Networking Tools<br />Information and Connections Flow in Many Directions<br />Building Relationships<br />Inspiring Others To Take Action: Credit Free Zone<br />       <br />
    20. Networked nonprofits are masters at using social media. They are adept at using tools that encourage conversations between people, and between people and organizations. They are able to scale their efforts quickly, easily and inexpensively. Networked nonprofits are also masters at blending tried and true methods with new digital tools. <br />re Masters at using social media <br />
    21. What can we learn from nonprofits born as Networked Nonprofits?<br />
    22. Key results generally include:<br />• increasing the movement size by increasing membership• garnering attention from all media through creative engagements• getting policies passed• working with aligned partner organizations• increasing capacity<br />
    23. Attention in An Age of Media Overload<br />Source: Steve Rubel<br />FRIENDING THE FINISH LINE: SOCIAL MEDIA NONPROFIT BEST PRACTICES <br />
    24. Momsrising wanted to demonstrate to Congress that there was a grassroots constituency that supported Medicaid and dispel a misperception that while Medicare has a strong constituency, Medicaid did not.<br />
    25. 500 Stories from 43 states<br />Curated best ones that illustrated their message<br />Repurposed across channels<br />100K emails to congress<br />
    26. Learning Leads to Success ….<br />“Metrics Monday”<br />“Joyful Funerals”<br />
    27. Not all nonprofits are born as Networked Nonprofits with an agility to use social media effectively ….<br />It‘s a lot like learning how to juggle. You don’t start with more than 2 balls …. <br />
    28. KSW's mission is to produce, present, and promote art that empowers Asian American artists and communities.<br />
    29. Focused on one channel (Facebook) to use best practices to:<br />Increase awareness by doubling our number of fans<br />RESULT: We went from 343 to 593 fans<br /> <br />Increase engagement by doubling comments/likes per post<br />RESULT: Our post feedback went up 269%<br />Increase participation of new people in classes and events RESULT: 10% new students /attenders say they heard about us through Facebook<br />-Audience: Artists and community<br />-Strategy: Show the human face of artists, remove the mystique, get audience to share their favorites, connect with other organizations<br />
    30. Photos<br />Worked: Showing our faces, looking behind-the-scenes<br />Didn’t Work: Posting on evenings/weekends, links to event albums<br />AH-HA! Our FB page needed a personality makeover; we needed to be ourselves<br /> <br />Questions<br />Worked: Fun, easy to answer questions that tapped into our fans’ expertise<br />Didn’t Work: Anything too personal and open-ended questions.<br />AH-HA! We needed to engage our audience in a two-way conversation<br /> <br />Partnerships<br />Worked: Mutually supporting another page, using that page as a source of content<br />Didn’t Work: Last-minute giveaways<br />AH-HA! Partnering with another org can expand our audience and provide interesting content.<br /> <br />Other<br />Multiple posts per day<br />Weekly editorial calendaring<br />Commenting on other pages<br />Tagging<br />Enlisting board members to invite friends (result: +40 fans)<br />
    31. Share Pair: What resonated? What can apply to your organization? What have you thought about before?<br />
    32. Crawl, Walk, Run, FlyLiving Case Studies<br />
    33. If you can’t fly then run, if you can’t run then walk, if you can’t walk then crawl, but whatever you do you have to keep moving forward.”<br />Inspiration<br />
    34. Where to focus …<br />SMART Social Media Objective<br />Pilot: Focus on one channel<br />Incremental Capacity Building<br />Ladder of Engagement<br />Content <br />Best Practices<br />Basic Measurement<br />Internet Presence: Blog or Website<br />Communications Strategy<br />Culture Change<br />Advanced Measurement<br />Network Building<br />Multi-Channel Engagement<br />
    35. Social Media Success StorySamaritan House<br />We did a Social Media Challenge this summer, which raised $10,000 for the organization. We asked participants to join our Fan page and Twitter, and there was a monetary value to each post. We had a sponsor, Franklin Templeton, who matched us - we raised $5000 on our own and they matched us for another $5,000. We did Press follow up and got written up in some of the local media.<br />
    36. Social Media Success StoryCompassPoint<br />For our Daring to Lead report we were able to leverage social media to increase the number of respondents tot he survey around the country. After the we published the report, social media was a critical distribution channel.<br />
    37. Social Media Success StoryFelidae Conservation Fund<br />We have Facebook, Twitter, and Linked In accounts that we utilize regularly. They allow us to post news and updates and promote events and and invite additional people to events.<br />
    38. Social Media Success StoryORAMRefugee<br />Only recently started with this organization. At my previous position, we successfully integrated social media in our annual conference, providing attendees with a valuable new way to interact with presenters, in workshops, and with each other.<br />
    39. Part 2: The 8 Social Media Habits <br />of Highly Effective Network Nonprofits<br />
    40. Eight Habits<br /> Aligns social media with their communications strategy and objectives<br />Scales social media by empowering everyone in the organization and integrating social into work flow<br />Monitors, listens, and researches the people in their network<br />Get feedback and start conversations about their work<br />Masters of relationship marketing<br />Curate content to capture attention from their network in an age of information overload<br />Work with free agents , champions, and influencers to spread their mission<br />Learn from experience and data<br />
    41. 1. Aligns social media with their communications strategy and objectives<br />
    42. Begin with Communications and Program Assessment<br /><ul><li>Who do you want to reach?
    43. What do you want to accomplish?
    44. Where can social improve or supplement programs, services, or communications?
    45. What’s our available budget/time?
    46. What opportunities to pilot?</li></li></ul><li>SMART Social Media Objectives<br />1. How many?<br />2.By when?<br />
    47. IQ TEST: What objective SMART?<br />Recruit 10 organizations to join our LinkedIn organization page by June 30, 2012<br />Set up LinkedIn organization page<br />
    48. Results<br />Acquire 100 new donors through social media channels by June 30, 2012<br />Tactical Increase comments with fans on Facebook to 3 comments per post by June 30, 2012<br />Capacity<br />Create one video per month to tell stories about the impact of our organization by January, 2012.<br />Integrate social media across organization staff and board to use it reach goals by September 30, 2012<br />Examples: SMART Social Media Objectives<br />
    49. To get 15,000 Facebook advocates to put a virtual pin on their profile to signal support for healthy kids and families by Jan. 2010<br />To do document virtual activity and place pins on x number of legislators to signal support for healthy kids and families by Jan. 2010<br />
    50. Share Pair<br /><ul><li>Who do you want to reach?
    51. What do you want to accomplish?
    52. Can you make it SMART?</li></li></ul><li>Charting: <br />What are your planned events, program, content, or opportunities for the year or month or quarter?<br />Where social media integration can improve or supplement programs, services, or communications? <br />What program or event is a priority in the organizational work plan?<br />What’s an area of social media practice that you want to improve? <br />
    53. Meeting To Agree on Measurable Objectives<br />1: Understand Background<br />2: Assemble Your Team<br />3: Meeting: Discuss<br />Success/Failure<br />4: Brainstorm<br />5: Vote<br />
    54. 2. Scales social media by empowering everyone in the organization and integrating social into work flow<br />
    55. Sharing control over their branding and marketing messages<br />Dealing with negative comments<br />Addressing personality versus organizational voice (trusting employees)<br />Make mistakes<br />Privacy and Security concerns<br />Suffering from information overload already, this will cause more<br />
    56. The Tension Between Privacy and Publicness<br />What information am I sharing?<br />Who am I sharing with?<br />
    57. What are the conversation starters about social media that your organization needs to have?<br />
    58. The Rule Book: Social Media Policy<br /><ul><li> Encouragement and support
    59. Why policy is needed
    60. Cases when it will be used, distributed
    61. Oversight, notifications, and legal implications
    62. Guidelines
    63. Identity and transparency
    64. Responsibility
    65. Confidentiality
    66. Judgment and common sense
    67. Best practices
    68. Tone
    69. Expertise
    70. Respect
    71. Quality
    72. Additional resources
    73. Training
    74. Operational Guidelines
    75. Escalation
    76. Policy examples available at wiki.altimetergroup.com</li></li></ul><li>Vision Statement<br />http://www.bethkanter.org/trust-control/<br />
    77. Participation Guidelines for Everyone<br />http://www.bethkanter.org/trust-control/<br />
    78. Trust is Cheaper than Control …..<br />
    79. Facebook Specific: Community Guidelines<br />“Girl Scouts of the USA welcomes interaction, discussion, commentary, questions and criticism but ask that comments are kept relevant and respectful. GSUSA reserves the right to remove comments or ban anyone who violates these guidelines. Personal attacks, inappropriate language, spamming and excessive posting will not be tolerated.”<br />
    80. Three Models<br />Need to dedicate time to implementation<br />
    81. DC Jazz Fest<br />“We used social media to spread the word about a special artist performing on the National Mall. Using Twitter, we started the campaign the night prior to the 'free" concert. and sent tweet all morning long. We had 60,000 on the Mall that day. It was incredible. 10% of staff position is used to manage a group of interns.”<br />
    82. <ul><li>3 person staff
    83. Social media responsibilities in all three job descriptions
    84. Weekly 20 minute meeting to coordinate
    85. Three initiatives to support SMART objectives
    86. Weekly video
    87. Mommy blogger outreach
    88. Facebook engagement/contests</li></li></ul><li>Wendy Harman<br />American Red Cross<br />Create ROI MeasurementsDevelop Internal Education and Training<br />Apply Social Insights to the Strategic Plan<br />Get Buy-In from Stakeholders<br />Develops Listening and Monitoring Strategy<br />Gets Tools and Technologies in place<br />Facilitate policy and procedures<br />Community manager<br />Full-Time Staff Member<br />
    89. Using Measurement for Capacity Building<br />Tracked Results: Stage 1 – Integrated into staff<br />Stage 2 – Hired social media staff<br />
    90. Share Pair:<br />What does your organization need to do integrate social media into staff’s work flow?<br />What’s needed to develop a social media policy?<br />
    91. 3. Monitors, listens, and researches the people in their network<br />
    92. DIY Listening Dashboard<br />
    93. Brainstorm Keywords<br /><ul><li> Nonprofit Name
    94. Other nonprofit names in your space
    95. Program, services, and event names
    96. CEO or well-known personalities associated with your organization
    97. Other nonprofits with similar program names
    98. Your brand or tagline
    99. URLs for your blog, web site, online community
    100. Industry terms or other phrases
    101. Issue area, synonyms, geography
    102. Your known strengths and weaknesses.</li></li></ul><li>4. Get feedback and start conversations about their work<br />
    103. Crowdsource ideas from the audience ….<br />
    104. Think and Write: A question, video, or visual that will spark conversation about your organization’s programs?<br />
    105. 5. Masters of relationship marketing<br />
    106. 6. Works with free agents, champions, and influencers to spread their mission<br />
    107. USA for UNHCR  raises funds and awareness in the United States for the lifesaving work that more than 6,000 staffers of Geneva-based UNHCR undertake for refugees around the world, 24/7.   <br />USA for UNHCR created the Blue Key campaign as a way to drive awareness of this global issue in the US. The $5 blue key pin or pendant symbolizes the one thing most of us have and that refugees don’t: a key to their own home.<br />
    108. The Blue Key site was only launched in December 2010, and its social/digital aspects were relatively new, so there was not a lot of data to base KPIs on. Overall, when we went into the first phase of the campaign, we had two goals: to secure at least three Blue Key Champions, and  to get 6,000 keys ordered between May 9 and June 20 (World Refugee Day).<br />These goals were important to USA for UNHCR first, because the entire Blue Key campaign revolves around more people purchasing keys, and second, because with a limited budget for traditional outreach, we relied on willing bloggers to help us get the word out.<br />
    109. Tweetathon held on June 13; one week before World Refugee Day (June 20). Champions signed up Tweet about the refugee crisis and #bluekey. RoyaHosseini did a Twitter Chat. <br />
    110. 7. Curates content to capture attention from people in their network in an age of information overload<br />
    111. Content curation is the organizing, filtering and “making sense of” information on the web and sharing the very best content with your network.<br />
    112. Tweets links related to organization’s mission and work as a bipartisan advocacy organization dedicated to making children and families a priority in federal policy and budget decisions. <br />
    113. 8. Learns from experience and improves<br />
    114. gristastic ladder ‘o engagement<br />grist sets the agenda by showing how green is reshaping our world. we cut through the noise and empower a new generation to make change.<br />
    115. grist.org’s key results are:<br />Footprint: The reach of their activities, both online and offline<br />Engagement: Readers engage with their content<br />Individual Behavior Change: Impact on users behaviors, purchase decisions, and daily lives that are in line with sustainability<br />Societal Change: Impact on society, policy discussions, and conversations that advance sustainable practices.<br />“We have embraced intelligent decision-making, not excessive data collection. There’s so much data we could collect, but it potentially could be a morass. We pay attention to these key indicators. The data informs our editorial decisions and choices for social media tactics so they are on track for moving people up the rungs of the ladder – from passive readers to green consumers and ultimately to a more sustainable planet.” - Chip Geller<br />
    116. twitter chat: #sodawars<br />quick and effective way to <br />give content more legs<br />
    117. “super” twitter chat: #bikenomics<br />840 tweets <br />reached close to 250,000 people<br />created an entirely new avenue for the topic<br />
    118. twitsourcing #hipsterfarmerbands<br />over 815 tweets in two days<br />reach of over 290,000 people<br />being quick and opportunistic reaches outside new audience <br />
    119. Eight Habits<br /> Aligns social media with their communications strategy and objectives<br />Scales social media by empowering everyone in the organization and integrating social into work flow<br />Monitors, listens, and researches the people in their network<br />Get feedback and start conversations about their work<br />Masters of relationship marketing<br />Curate content to capture attention from their network in an age of information overload<br />Work with free agents , champions, and influencers to spread their mission<br />Learn from experience and data<br />
    120. Reflection and Book Raffle<br />What is one idea that you can put into practice?<br />What resources do you need to be successful?<br />What are the challenges?<br />What is one small step you can take tomorrow? <br />
    121. Thank you<br />http://www.bethkanter.org<br />http://socialmedia-strategy.wikispaces.com/<br />http://www.facebook.com/beth.kanter.blog<br />

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