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  • Today we will continue our discussion of Literary Concepts.
  • So far we have talked about Plot, Setting, Tone, Mood, and Character. Today, we will look at POV-the position from which the story is told. WhyYou ask? Because the POV helps us to understand the author’s intentions. It also influences the method and timing of revealing details to the reader.
  • As I am sure you remember from a previous discussion, The POV depends on the narrator—not to be confused with the author of a text. The narrator is the imagined voice telling the story.
  • We are going to talk about three points of view today;there are, of course, others. The Omniscient narrator knows all, including the thoughts, feelings, and actions of every character in the story. This is much different from the 3rd person limited narrator, who only knows the thoughts and feelings of a single character. He or she sees other characters and reports on their behavior but not their motivations or feelings. The first person narrator tells his or her story, but he or she often has limited knowledge about events other than those which directly affect him or her.
  • I will use as an example of point of view, “The Three Little Pigs.” It is not only well known, but also fairly simple to recount for those who may not be familiar with the tale. The objective in using a text as basic and familiar as this one is to take the emphasis off of comprehension so that we can focus completely on aspects of narration. Later, we will apply what we learn to more interesting reading. In other words, we will use simple text to master the technique; then we will apply the technique to more challenging text. The story follows three pigs sent out into the world by their mother. Each of them builds a house: one of straw, one of sticks, and the last of bricks. The wolf blows down each of the first two houses, but he cannot even scuff the brick house. Finally, he attempts to sneak in through the chimney. The third pig is ready for his entrance and places a pot of boiling water in the fireplace. When the wolf leaps into the chimney, he lands in the pot and the pig makes a stew out of him.
  • In order to identify POV, we must do close reading of the text. Each example here demonstrates an aspect we find in Omniscient writing. The pigs’ mother “loved them all equally,” which tells us both how she feels and the measure of that feeling. In the second example, we find out that first little pig “built his house of straw because it was easy,” which tells us of his motivation for using straw. In the third example, the big bad wolf “saw the first little pig,” so we know that not only was he in the area, but that he actually saw the pig in his home. In the final example, we see that the perspective has shifted to the pig, who now sees the wolf and responds accordingly. If the piece were written in the third person limited, we would indeed see much less of the broader story, but we would likely get more intimate details about the limited character.
  • This version of the Three Little Pigs is presented as a third-person narrative by the mother pig. After she sends her three boys off into the world with her bit of advice, she is left to wonder about their fates. She, and consequently the reader, knows nothing of their adventure with the wolf until she receives a phone call from her third son.
  • The mother’s story is drastically different from the omniscient perspective. We cannot know what happened to little pigs, until she hears from her 3rd son of the fate of the other two; we would, however, likely have much more information about how she felt at sending them off into the world.In the first example, we see how she feels: she worries; and in the second example, we see that she waits for news. In the third person limited, there is no way for either us or her to know what happens unless she sees, hears, or learns of it. In the third example, when her son calls her, we learn what happened to the three little pigs.
  • First-person - Narrator participates in action but sometimes has limited knowledge/vision about events outside of those in which he or she is directly involved and motivations that are not his or her own. The first person, however, allows for an intimacy between the reader and the narrator that cannot be rivaled by another POV. The True Story of the Three Little Pigs is presented as a first-person narrative by the wolf, who portrays the entire incident as a misunderstanding. He had gone to the pigs to borrow some sugar, had destroyed their houses in a sneezing fit, and had eaten the first two pigs just to avoid food going to waste (the pigs had died in the house collapse anyway). Ultimately, he had been caught violently attacking the third pig’s house because the pig had continually insulted himThis is the intro to the story. Notice the personal nature of the monologue: “Everybody knows the story of the Three Little Pigs. Or at least they think they do. But I'll let you in on a little secret. Nobody knows the real story because nobody has ever heard my side of the story. I'm Alexander T. Wolf. The real story is about a sneeze and a cup of sugar.”
  • To indentify first person perspective, we first look for the pronoun, “I.” Here is this first example we see that the wolf says “I was making,” “I had a terrible cold,” “I ran out of sugar,” and “I went to borrow a cup.” The second example shows us that the wolf does not know the motivations of other characters. While the omniscient narrator told us that first pig built his house out of straw because it “Was easy,” in this first person account through the wolf, neither the wolf nor we can know why. In the third example, the wolf tells us of his personal commitment to his story when he says “wolf’s honor.” This kind of intimate communication cannot be conveyed directly to the reader from another pov. Finally, in the last example, the Wolf tells us about his own feelings, a confession that we can not so easily believe from another kind of narrator.
  • The omniscient point of view gives the reader a broad, objective overview of the story, but it is difficult to create well-developed characters or much intimacy from such a distance. The third person point of view allows more development of characters than the omniscient approach. Moreover, the narrator seems more objective than one from a first-person point of view. The first person point of view allows for a very intimate, warm connection to the narrator, but the facts in the story are often seen as more subjective. We all know that when we tell our own stories, we leave out the parts we don’t care to share.

Transcript

  • 1. +EWRT 30Class 7
  • 2. + AGENDA Due: Project #1: Poetry: Sat 7:00 am Lecture: Elements of Fiction Plot POV Guided Writing: POV
  • 3. +Talking about Writing:Elements of Fiction
  • 4. Basic Elements of a Story1. PLOT - the story line; a unified, progressive pattern of action or events in a story2. POINT OF VIEW (POV) - the position from which the story is told3. CHARACTER - person portraying himself or another4. SETTING - the time and place of the action in a story5. TONE - the attitude of the author toward his subject or toward the reader6. MOOD - the feeling or state of mind that predominates in a story creating a certain atmosphere
  • 5. + Plot The series of events and actions that takes place in a story.
  • 6. + Elements of Plot •Conflict •Man VS Man •Man VS Nature •Man VS Society •Man VS Himself
  • 7. + Climax: The turning point. The most Plot Line intense moment (either mentally or in action). The conflict is generally addressed here. Rising Action: the series of conflicts and crisis in the story that lead to Falling Action: all of the the climax. action that follows the Climax. Conflict: Struggle between opposing forces Resolution: The conclusion; the tying together of all of theExposition: The start of the story. threads.The way things are before theaction starts.
  • 8. +TheThreeLittlePigs
  • 9. Climax: The wolf tries to climb in through the chimney, but + Action:Rising the little pig is ready for him. The wolf falls in a pot of boiling water.The 3rd little pig builds his house out ofbricks. The wolf tries and tries to blowthe brick house down, but he can’t. Falling Action: The little pig celebrates with wolf stew!The 2nd little pig builds a house out ofsticks, but the wolf blows that one downtoo.The 1st little pig builds a house out ofstraw, but the wolf blows it down.Conflict: Man vs. Man Resolution: The little pigThe wolf is trying to eat the three little pigs. continues to live happily everExposition: The three little pigs live at after in his safe, little home.home with their mother. They go offinto the world to find their fortunes.
  • 10. + Point of View Who tells the story
  • 11. +Narrator  POV Depends on the Narrator The narrator is the “one who tells, or is assumed to be telling, the story in a given narrative,” that is, “the imagined „voice‟ transmitting the story.” The narrator is distinguished from the real author (The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms).
  • 12. Omniscient Point+ of View: An “Hansel knew he belonged in the front because external narrator Gretel was just a girl. Gretel dropped breadcrumbs behind her as she went, knowing is telling the that her bumbling brother couldn’t be counted story. (S)he on to find his way home. Ahead of them, an old witch waited, her stomach speaks for all rumbling at the thought of what a delicious characters and dinner the two plump children would make.” knows everything.
  • 13. Limited Omniscient:+ Third person, told “In his black suit he stood in the dark glass where from the viewpoint of the lilies leaned so palely from their waisted a character in the cutglass vase. He looked down at the guttered candlestub. He pressed his thumbprint in the story. (S)he knows warm wax pooled on the oak veneer. Lastly he only what one looked at the face so caved and drawn among the character folds of funeral cloth, the yellowed sees, does, and feels. moustache, the eyelids paper thin. That was not sleeping. That was not sleeping.Cormac McCarthy All the Pretty Horses
  • 14. + “I have been afraid of putting air in a tire ever since I saw a tractor tire blow up and throw Newt Hardbine’s father over the top of the Standard Oil sign. I’m not lying. He got stuck up there. The first person narrator uses the pronoun “I.” The Bean Trees - Barbara Kingsolver
  • 15. Review:+Three Common Points of View  Omniscient: The narrator knows everything, including what each character is thinking, feeling, and doing throughout the story.  3rd Person Limited: The narrator knows only the thoughts and feelings of a single character, while other characters are presented only externally.  1st Person: The narrator participates in action but sometimes has limited knowledge about both events outside of those in which he or she is directly involved and motivations that are not his or her own.
  • 16. + The Three Little Pigs is a classic folk tale from the oral tradition. It was originally published in the 18th Century with an Omniscient Narrator  The story follows three pigs sent out into the world by their mother. Each of them builds a house: one of straw, one of sticks, and the last of bricks. The wolf blows down each of the first two houses, but he cannot even scuff the brick house. Finally, he attempts to sneak in through the chimney. The third pig is ready for his entrance and places a pot of boiling water in the fireplace. When the wolf leaps into the chimney, he lands in the pot and the pig makes a stew out of him.
  • 17. + Identifying the Omniscient Perspective their mother, who loved them  a big bad wolf came along and equally, told them " Whatever saw the first little pig in his you do, do it the best that you house of straw. can because thats the way to get along in the world.” The first little pig built his house  The [third] little pig saw the out of straw because it was the wolf climb up on the roof. He easiest thing to do. lit a roaring fire in the fireplace and placed on it a large kettle of water. Definition Omniscient Perspective: The narrator knows what each character is thinking, feeling, and doing throughout the story.
  • 18. + 3rd Person Limited: Mother Pig An abbreviated version of the complete tale  This version of the Three Little Pigs is presented as a third-person narrative by the mother pig. After she sends her three boys off into the world with her bit of advice, she is left to wonder about their fates. She, and consequently the reader, knows nothing of their adventure with the wolf until she receives a phone call from her third son.
  • 19. + Identifying the Third Person Limited Perspective  The boys left and she, as any good mother would, worried  One late night the phone rang. incessantly about how they It was her third son, George. fared. “Mom,” he yelled “you were right.” John and Paul built houses out of straw and wood.  Day after day, she waited for This gigantic, bad wolf came news of her offspring. She busied herself by cleaning and blew them down one after their rooms. the other. Definition 3rd person limited: Third person limited point of view is a method of storytelling in which the narrator knows only the thoughts and feelings of a single character, while other characters are presented only externally.
  • 20. + 1st Person: The True Story of the Three Little Pigs by Jon Scieszka and Lane Smith. An Abbreviated Version of the Complete Tale The True Story of the Three Little Pigs is presented as a first- person narrative by the wolf, who portrays the entire incident as a misunderstanding. He had gone to the pigs to borrow some sugar, had destroyed their houses in a sneezing fit, and had eaten the first two pigs just to avoid food going to waste (the pigs had died in the house collapse anyway). Ultimately, he had been caught violently attacking the third pig‟s house because the pig had continually insulted him
  • 21. + First-person – The narrator participates in action but sometimes has limited knowledge/vision about events outside of those in which he or she is directly involved and motivations that are not his or her own. The first person, however, allows for an intimacy between the reader and the narrator that cannot be rivaled by another POV. “Everybody knows the story of the Three Little Pigs. Or at least they think they do. But Ill let you in on a little secret. Nobody knows the real story because nobody has ever heard my side of the story. Im Alexander T. Wolf. The real story is about a sneeze and a cup of sugar.”
  • 22. + Identifying the First Person Perspective  I was making a birthday  When the dust cake for my dear old cleared, there was the granny. I had a terrible second little pig - dead as a cold. I ran out of sugar, so I doornail. Wolfs honor. went to borrow a cup from a neighbor.  Now Im a pretty calm  I mean who would build a fellow. But when somebody house of straw? talks about my granny, I go a little crazy.Definition 1st person: The narrator participates in action but sometimes has limitedknowledge about both events outside of those in which he or she is directly involvedand motivations that are not his or her own.
  • 23. + Why different perspectives? Because each one has its own benefits!  The omniscient point of view gives the reader a broad, objective overview of the story, but it is difficult to create well-developed characters or much intimacy from such a distance.  The third person point of view allows more development of characters than the omniscient approach. Moreover, the narrator seems more objective than one from a first-person point of view.  The first person point of view allows for a very intimate, warm connection to the narrator, but the facts in the story are often seen as more subjective. We all know that when we tell our own stories, we leave out the parts we don‟t care to share.
  • 24. Consider this? Does it change anything? oreverything? Imagine this story. Whatperspective would you use here? 3rd limited orfirst through the pig? Third or first through thewolf? Omniscient? + So
  • 25. Guided WritingDevise a plot for the story of The Three Little Pigs as amurder with the wolf as a hit man. Choose a POV to make itinteresting. Use the drawing as your prompt.1st person: the Pig or the Wolf3rd Limited: the Pig or the WolfOmniscient
  • 26. + Homework Post #7: Your new version of The Three Little Pigs. Reading: Note the Plot and POV of each  “The Tell TaleHeart” Edgar Allan Poe  “A Very Short Story” Ernest Hemingway  “Dr. Chevalier‟s Lie” Kate Chopin