Chapter 9            Heart-of-the-House          Management I: Food and          Beverage, Housekeeping,        Laundry, a...
Competencies for               Heart-of-the-House Management I     1. Explain why food and beverage facilities are critica...
Competencies for               Heart-of-the-House Management I                                (continued)     1. Describe ...
Types of Meal Plans              •      All-inclusive              •      American Plan (AP)              •      Bed and b...
Popular Resort Event Themes                   • International food festivals                   • Specific country themes  ...
Popular Resort Event Themes                                (continued)          • Holiday celebrations: Valentine’s Day, S...
Limiting Factors in Planning                           In-Room Menus   • The ability of the kitchen to prepare in-room ite...
Limiting Factors in Planning                           In-Room Menus                                 (continued)          ...
Limiting Factors in Planning                           In-Room Menus                                (continued)          •...
Tasks Included in Full Rehabilitation   • Stripping the floor and replacing carpet   • Stripping and repainting the walls ...
Procedures for Turndown Service      1. Cleaning the bathroom and restocking it with fresh         towels.      2. Tidying...
Laundry and Dry Cleaning                           Requirement Options     1. A complete linen rental service plus outside...
Physical Layout of Limited Laundry      1. Soiled laundry collection, classification, and counting      2. Washing-extract...
Basic Full-Service In-House                           Laundry Equipment          • Washer-extractors of varying size/load ...
Basic Full-Service In-House                           Laundry Equipment                                   (continued)   • ...
Possible Savings with Ozone                            Laundry Systems                   • Water and sewage reduction: 20–...
Factors to Consider when                Designing a Laundry Operation         • Number of rooms         • Types of beds   ...
Steps in Internal Control        1. Periodic billing from the contractor        2. Preparation of the valet or laundry vou...
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Chapter 9

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Chapter 9

  1. 1. Chapter 9 Heart-of-the-House Management I: Food and Beverage, Housekeeping, Laundry, and Valet Operations World of Resorts: From Development to Management Third Edition (424TXT or 424CIN)© 2010, Educational Institute
  2. 2. Competencies for Heart-of-the-House Management I 1. Explain why food and beverage facilities are critical to resorts and identify factors that affect a resort’s food and beverage choices. 2. Describe the organization and division of duties in typical resort kitchens and identify current trends in kitchen design and cuisine. 3. Explain the critical importance of the menu and define different menu types and meal plans. 4. Identify and discuss important elements of food and beverage merchandising and of room service at a resort.© 2010, Educational Institute (continued) 2
  3. 3. Competencies for Heart-of-the-House Management I (continued) 1. Describe the coordination that must exist between a resort’s housekeeping department and all other departments and explain why it is important. 2. Identify housekeeping department staffing and scheduling concepts and tools, and describe the role of housekeeping standards—including factors and trends that may affect those standards. 3. Identify and describe the range of factors that a resort should consider when deciding how it will address its laundry and dry cleaning needs.© 2010, Educational Institute 3
  4. 4. Types of Meal Plans • All-inclusive • American Plan (AP) • Bed and breakfast (B&B) • Continental plan (CP) • Dine-around plan • Flexi-plan • European plan (EP) • Modified American plan (MAP) or half pension© 2010, Educational Institute 4
  5. 5. Popular Resort Event Themes • International food festivals • Specific country themes • Texas barbecues and outdoor chuck wagons • Hawaiian luaus • Oktoberfest • Scandinavian smorgasbords • English hunt breakfasts© 2010, Educational Institute (continued) 5
  6. 6. Popular Resort Event Themes (continued) • Holiday celebrations: Valentine’s Day, St. Patrick’s Day, Easter, Chinese New Year, Cinco de Mayo, Fourth of July, Bastille Day, Halloween, Thanksgiving, Christmas, etc. • Wine and cheese parties • Casino nights: Las Vegas, Macau, Monte Carlo, etc. • Picnics • New England clambakes© 2010, Educational Institute 6
  7. 7. Limiting Factors in Planning In-Room Menus • The ability of the kitchen to prepare in-room items when the full kitchen is shut down after regular meal hours and between the last meal of the day and breakfast. • The effect of holding time of food quality. Many dishes deteriorate shortly after cooking. For example, pancakes can turn rubbery, steaks ordered rare can continue to cook, and delicate soufflés are not likely to survive the trip from the kitchen to the rooms. • Temperature control and functional delivery equipment. Keeping hot food hot and cold food cold is difficult to achieve consistently. (continued)© 2010, Educational Institute 7
  8. 8. Limiting Factors in Planning In-Room Menus (continued) • Time sensitivity of orders and ease of assembly for quick delivery. • Kitchen assembly space for room service cart setups and tray assembly. • Supervision. Supervision of dining room staff is direct, but oversight of room service staff is done remotely and based on trust.© 2010, Educational Institute (continued) 8
  9. 9. Limiting Factors in Planning In-Room Menus (continued) • Pricing. Higher prices are required to cover the high overhead of in-room service, but guests do not always understand or appreciate this. • System organization and detailed procedures from order-taking in the kitchen office to expediting orders to guest billing and service follow-up, including complaints handling.© 2010, Educational Institute 9
  10. 10. Tasks Included in Full Rehabilitation • Stripping the floor and replacing carpet • Stripping and repainting the walls and hanging wallpaper • Rebuilding, repairing, reupholstering, or replacing furniture • Replacing worn, frayed, or stained bedspread, drapes, lamp shades, and other items • Repainting the bath area; checking bathroom plumbing and replacing worn or rusted parts, showerheads, and faucets; and replacing cracked or chipped tiles • Checking the heating, air-conditioning, and ventilation system© 2010, Educational Institute 10
  11. 11. Procedures for Turndown Service 1. Cleaning the bathroom and restocking it with fresh towels. 2. Tidying the guestroom, including emptying wastebaskets. 3. Removing the bed cover and placing it in the closet. 4. Folding back the blanket and top sheet. 5. Fluffing the pillow. 6. Drawing the drapes. 7. Filling the mini-bar ice bucket with fresh ice.© 2010, Educational Institute 11
  12. 12. Laundry and Dry Cleaning Requirement Options 1. A complete linen rental service plus outside concessions for other resort and guest laundry and dry cleaning 2. A limited in-house laundry for small items, a linen rental service for large items, and outside concessions for other resort and guest laundry and dry cleaning 3. A combination of a full-service laundry and a dry cleaning plant for resort needs and outside concessions for guest laundry and dry cleaning 4. A complete full-service laundry and dry cleaning plant to serve all needs of the resort and its guests© 2010, Educational Institute 12
  13. 13. Physical Layout of Limited Laundry 1. Soiled laundry collection, classification, and counting 2. Washing-extracting 3. Drying 4. Folding and hanging 5. Storing in a portion of the department’s linen and uniform storage room© 2010, Educational Institute 13
  14. 14. Basic Full-Service In-House Laundry Equipment • Washer-extractors of varying size/load capacities • Tumblers or dryers of varying size/load capacities • Dry cleaner • Flatwork ironer • Folding facilities and automatic folding equipment, with or without ironing capability© 2010, Educational Institute (continued) 14
  15. 15. Basic Full-Service In-House Laundry Equipment (continued) • Water-conditioning equipment; water-reclaiming system • Pressing equipment, such as automatic steam pressers and shirt pressers • Steam box for finishing uniforms • Miscellaneous equipment such as laundry carts and racks© 2010, Educational Institute 15
  16. 16. Possible Savings with Ozone Laundry Systems • Water and sewage reduction: 20–30 percent • Cut in hot water consumption: 90+ percent • Savings in fuel to heat water: 70–80 percent • Chemical reduction: 20–30 percent • Cutting dryer time: 50–60 percent • Saved production time: 15 percent • Maintenance of wash equipment: 25 percent© 2010, Educational Institute 16
  17. 17. Factors to Consider when Designing a Laundry Operation • Number of rooms • Types of beds • Expected occupancy rates • Types of linens • Number and types of towels • Where towels will be used (room, pool, club, spa, hair salon) • Number and kinds of napkins, tablecloths, uniforms • Restaurant turnover • Provision of dry cleaning© 2010, Educational Institute 17
  18. 18. Steps in Internal Control 1. Periodic billing from the contractor 2. Preparation of the valet or laundry voucher in the housekeeping department 3. Transmittal of the voucher to the front office cashier 4. Posting of the charge to the guest’s account© 2010, Educational Institute 18

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