Synthesis Part II<br />Developing and Organizing Support for Your Arguments<br />
Provide Evidence in the Form of Facts, Statistics and Expert Opinion<br />Summarize<br />Paraphrase <br />Quote<br />Make ...
Appeal to Both Reason and Emotions<br />
Engage the Reader Emotionally by Appealing to Self Interest<br />Erotomania can be defined as a psychological disorder in ...
Use Climatic Order<br />Make your strongest point last and the second most memorable point first.<br />
Use Logical or Conventional Order<br />Problem/Solution<br />Two sides of a controversy<br />Comparison-and-contrast<br />...
Present and Respond to Counterarguments<br />Introduction and claim<br />Main opposing argument<br />Refutation of opposin...
Use Concession<br />Introduction and claim<br />Important opposing argument<br />Concession of opposing argument validity<...
The Comparison and Contrast Synthesis<br />
Compare: look for similarities<br />
Contrast: look for differences<br />
Discover the significant criteria for analysis<br />q<br />
How do you develop a comparison and contrast synthesis?<br />
Organizing by Source or Subject<br />First, summarize  each of your sources or subjects<br />Next, discuss the significant...
Organization by Source Will Look Like This: <br />1. Introduce the paper; lead to thesis<br />2. Summarize the source of S...
Organization by Criteria<br />Introduce the paper and lead to the thesis<br />2. Criterion 1: Discuss what author one says...
Avoid the “So What” or “Why did I bother reading this” ending<br />Conclusions should be meaningful to your reader. <br />...
Avoid Common Fallacies<br />
The Explanatory Synthesis: Help Readers Understand a Topic<br />
Divide a Component into Its Parts and Present Them to a Reader <br />
Description that recreates an event, place, emotion or state of affairs<br />
Appear to be reasonably objective in manner<br />
Emphasizes the sources themselves and not the writer’s opinions<br />
Goal is to inform and not to persuade<br />
Exercise<br />Brainstorm of list of topics for the synthesis essay.<br />Locate two sources of information for your essay....
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Synthesis part ii

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Synthesis part ii

  1. 1. Synthesis Part II<br />Developing and Organizing Support for Your Arguments<br />
  2. 2. Provide Evidence in the Form of Facts, Statistics and Expert Opinion<br />Summarize<br />Paraphrase <br />Quote<br />Make sure to adopt a documentation style that is standard in your field. If you don’t know or have a style that is common, use MLA documentation style for this course.<br />
  3. 3. Appeal to Both Reason and Emotions<br />
  4. 4. Engage the Reader Emotionally by Appealing to Self Interest<br />Erotomania can be defined as a psychological disorder in which the afflicted relentlessly pursues the notion that the object of his/her affection reciprocates his/her romantic feelings and/or fantasies. Strangely the erotomaniac fails altogether to see the victim's lack of interest.<br />
  5. 5. Use Climatic Order<br />Make your strongest point last and the second most memorable point first.<br />
  6. 6. Use Logical or Conventional Order<br />Problem/Solution<br />Two sides of a controversy<br />Comparison-and-contrast<br />Following the conventions of the discipline (lab reports, business plans and so forth)<br />
  7. 7. Present and Respond to Counterarguments<br />Introduction and claim<br />Main opposing argument<br />Refutation of opposing argument<br />Main positive argument<br />
  8. 8. Use Concession<br />Introduction and claim<br />Important opposing argument<br />Concession of opposing argument validity<br />Positive arguments<br />
  9. 9. The Comparison and Contrast Synthesis<br />
  10. 10. Compare: look for similarities<br />
  11. 11. Contrast: look for differences<br />
  12. 12. Discover the significant criteria for analysis<br />q<br />
  13. 13. How do you develop a comparison and contrast synthesis?<br />
  14. 14. Organizing by Source or Subject<br />First, summarize each of your sources or subjects<br />Next, discuss the significant similarities and differences between them<br />
  15. 15. Organization by Source Will Look Like This: <br />1. Introduce the paper; lead to thesis<br />2. Summarize the source of Subject A by discussing its significant features.<br />3. Summarize the source of Subject B by discussing its significant features.<br />4. Write a paragraph where you discuss the significant points of comparison and contrast between sources or subjects A & B<br />5. End with a conclusion where you summarize your points and raise pertinent questions<br />
  16. 16. Organization by Criteria<br />Introduce the paper and lead to the thesis<br />2. Criterion 1: Discuss what author one says and discuss what author two says as a comparison and contrast or present what author one says and present author two in light of the first author’s opinion and present differences<br />3. Criterion 2 and so forth, repeat the above step.<br />4. End by summarizing key points and raising key pertinent questions<br />
  17. 17. Avoid the “So What” or “Why did I bother reading this” ending<br />Conclusions should be meaningful to your reader. <br />Comparison and contrast is not an ends to itself<br />Raise pertinent questions<br />
  18. 18. Avoid Common Fallacies<br />
  19. 19. The Explanatory Synthesis: Help Readers Understand a Topic<br />
  20. 20. Divide a Component into Its Parts and Present Them to a Reader <br />
  21. 21. Description that recreates an event, place, emotion or state of affairs<br />
  22. 22. Appear to be reasonably objective in manner<br />
  23. 23. Emphasizes the sources themselves and not the writer’s opinions<br />
  24. 24. Goal is to inform and not to persuade<br />
  25. 25. Exercise<br />Brainstorm of list of topics for the synthesis essay.<br />Locate two sources of information for your essay.<br />What type of synthesis will you develop? Explanatory or Argument?<br />Explain your purpose?<br />What is the “so what” factor that will conclude your essay?<br />How will you organize your material?<br />Post your answers in the form of an entry on your blog.<br />

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