Drawing conclusions
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Drawing conclusions

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Plenary presentation at University of Mary Washington Faculty Academy 2012, Virginia. An exploration of visual practice in our daily practice as teachers, learners and global citizens as a form of ...

Plenary presentation at University of Mary Washington Faculty Academy 2012, Virginia. An exploration of visual practice in our daily practice as teachers, learners and global citizens as a form of sense-making and information sharing.

Conference Site: http://blog12.facultyacademy.org/giulia-forsythe/

Recording: http://vimeo.com/42419735

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Drawing conclusions Drawing conclusions Presentation Transcript

  • Drawing Conclusions Giulia Forsythe
  • Visual Thinking Brainstorming Planning Learning Teaching
  • Planning
  • cc licensed ( BY NC SD ) flickr photo by courosa: http://flickr.com/photos/courosa/344832591/
  • Oshii, M. (Director). (1995). Ghost in the Shell [Film].
  • A few words...• The term “visual literacy” is credited to John Debes, co-founder of the International Visual Literacy Association.[1] In 1969 Debes offered a tentative definition of the concept: “Visual literacy refers to a group of vision-competencies a human being can develop by seeing and at the same time having and integrating other sensory experiences.”[2] A white paper drawn up in January 2004, defines visual literacy as "understanding how people perceive objects, interpret what they see, and what they learn from them." [3] However, because multiple disciplines such as visual literacy in education, art history and criticism, rhetoric, semiotics, philosophy, information design, and graphic design make use of the term visual literacy, arriving at a common definition of visual literacy has been contested since its first appearance in professional publications.• Since technological advances continue to develop at an unprecedented rate, educators are increasingly promoting the learning of visual literacies as indispensable to life in the information age. Similar to linguistic literacy (meaning making derived from written or oral human language) commonly taught in schools, most educators would agree that literacy in the 21st Century has a wider scope. Educators are recognizing the [4] importance of helping students develop visual literacies in order to survive and communicate in a highly complex world.• Many scholars from the New London Group such as Courtney Cazden, James Gee, Gunther Kress, and Allan [5] Luke advocate against the dichotomy of visual literacy versus linguistic literacy. Instead, they stress the necessity of accepting the co-presence of linguistic literacies and visual literacies as interacting and [6] interlacing modalities which complement one another in the meaning making process.• Visual literacy is not limited to modern mass media and new technologies. The graphic novel Understanding Comics by Scott McCloud discusses the history of narrative in visual media. Also, animal drawings in ancient caves, such as the one in Lascaux, France, are early forms of visual literacy. Hence, even though the name visual literacy itself as a label dates to the 1960s, the concept of reading signs and symbols is prehistoric.• Visual literacy is the ability to evaluate, apply, or create conceptual visual representations. Skills include the evaluation of advantages and disadvantages of visual representations, to improve shortcomings, to use them to create and communicate knowledge, or to devise new ways of representing insights. The didactic approach consists of rooting visualization in its application contexts, i.e. giving the necessary critical attitude, principles, tools and feedback to develop their own high-quality visualization formats for specific problems (problem- based learning). The commonalities of good visualization in diverse areas, and exploration of the specificities of visualization in the field of specialization (through real-life case studies).• Visual Literacy Standards for teaching in higher education were adopted by the Association of College & Research Libraries in 2012. They were "developed over a period of 19 months, informed by current literature, shaped by input from multiple communities and organizations, reviewed by individuals from over 50 institutions, and approved by 3 ACRL committees and the ACRL Board of Directors."
  • A few words...• The term “visual literacy” is credited to John Debes, co-founder of the International Visual Literacy Association.[1] In 1969 Debes offered a tentative definition of the concept: “Visual literacy refers to a group of vision-competencies a human being can develop by seeing and at the same time having and integrating other sensory experiences.”[2] A white paper drawn up in January 2004, defines visual literacy as "understanding how people perceive objects, interpret what they see, and what they learn from them." [3] However, because multiple disciplines such as visual literacy in education, art history and criticism, rhetoric, semiotics, philosophy, information design, and graphic design make use of the term visual literacy, arriving at a common definition of visual literacy has been contested since its first appearance in professional publications.• Since technological advances continue to develop at an unprecedented rate, educators are increasingly promoting the learning of visual literacies as indispensable to life in the information age. Similar to linguistic literacy (meaning making derived from written or oral human language) commonly taught in schools, most educators would agree that literacy in the 21st Century has a wider scope. Educators are recognizing the [4] importance of helping students develop visual literacies in order to survive and communicate in a highly complex world.• Many scholars from the New London Group such as Courtney Cazden, James Gee, Gunther Kress, and Allan [5] Luke advocate against the dichotomy of visual literacy versus linguistic literacy. Instead, they stress the necessity of accepting the co-presence of linguistic literacies and visual literacies as interacting and [6] interlacing modalities which complement one another in the meaning making process.• Visual literacy is not limited to modern mass media and new technologies. The graphic novel Understanding Comics by Scott McCloud discusses the history of narrative in visual media. Also, animal drawings in ancient caves, such as the one in Lascaux, France, are early forms of visual literacy. Hence, even though the name visual literacy itself as a label dates to the 1960s, the concept of reading signs and symbols is prehistoric.• Visual literacy is the ability to evaluate, apply, or create conceptual visual representations. Skills include the evaluation of advantages and disadvantages of visual representations, to improve shortcomings, to use them to create and communicate knowledge, or to devise new ways of representing insights. The didactic approach consists of rooting visualization in its application contexts, i.e. giving the necessary critical attitude, principles, tools and feedback to develop their own high-quality visualization formats for specific problems (problem- based learning). The commonalities of good visualization in diverse areas, and exploration of the specificities of visualization in the field of specialization (through real-life case studies).• Visual Literacy Standards for teaching in higher education were adopted by the Association of College & Research Libraries in 2012. They were "developed over a period of 19 months, informed by current literature, shaped by input from multiple communities and organizations, reviewed by individuals from over 50 institutions, and approved by 3 ACRL committees and the ACRL Board of Directors."
  • Tim Owens, We Are All Artists 1 Creativity is not inherited 2 In sports we accept the idea that with practice, we can get better. Why can’t we translate that to art? 3 A creative environment can foster creativity 4 ds106 is giving you that environment 5 Do not accept the lie that you were just not born creative 6 We are more creative when we are uncomfortable 7 Take something ordinary and make it extraordinary 8 Take something complex and make it simple 9 Take something new and make it old 10 Find inspiration in the world around you @timmmmyboy
  • Doodle Break• Are we all artists?
  • Structured Serendipity JASON ZWEIG, when asked: What scientific concept would improve everybodys cognitive toolkit?
  • Zack Dowell @noiseprofessor: http://www.noiseprofessor.org/?p=464
  • visualfeedback loop
  • Ken Robinson RSA AnimateChanging Education Paradigms
  • RSA Animate
  • RSA Animate David HarveyCrises of Capitalism
  • How we study our own autobiographies as learners is essential to our development as teachers -Stephen Brookfield
  • Doodle break• Learning is like...
  • “We cannot understand anything unless wecreate internal neuronal networks that reflect physical relationships” - James Zull
  • Abstract concepts are largely metaphorical -James Zull
  • Sunni Brown, TEDx
  • Sousanis, N. (2012). The Shape of our Thoughts. Draft Thesis. http://www.spinweaveandcut.blogspot.com/ Sousanis, N. (2012). The Shape of our Thoughts. Draft Thesis. http://www.spinweaveandcut.blogspot.ca/
  • Sousanis, N. (2012). The Shape of our Thoughts. Draft Thesis. http://www.spinweaveandcut.blogspot.com/
  • Drawing on Memories• As an essentially verbal education gains control, the child abandons his graphic efforts and relies almost entirely on words.• Edwards, B. (2008) Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain.
  • How we learn Zull
  • Emily Del Ross, DS106emilydelross.com
  • Doodle Break• My journey
  • Zull• Teach - techen
  • • Cathy Davidson
  • How we measure
  • Biktimirov, E. N., & Nilson, L. B. (2003). Mapping Your Course: Designing a Graphic Syllabus for Introductory Finance. Journal OfEducation For Business, 78(6), 308-312.
  • Doodle Break• Critical incident questionnaire (Brookfield)• Graph your attention• most engaged / least engaged
  • Monetarism- fixing price deflation“price deflation can be fought by dropping money out of a helicopter” Friedman, M. [1] money photo cc licensed ( BY ) flickr photo shared by AMagill and Helicopter from Apocalypse Now ↩
  • Taymore, J. (Director). (2007). Across the Universe [film]
  • Gilliam, T. (Director). (1985). Brazil [film]