The new visual world and future education design

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My Keynote presentation ppt for
The 14th International Conference on Education Research (ICER)
Conference theme: Future Education Design for All

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The new visual world and future education design

  1. 1. The 14th International Conference on Education Research (ICER) Future Education Design for All Keynote Speech The New Visual World and Future Education Design October 18, 2013 Professor Ilju Rha, Ph.D. Seoul National University Korea
  2. 2. Contents  The Visual World: old and new  The New Visual World and Education  Implications of the New Visual World for the Future Education Design  Aware / understand  Use / apply  Find / create  Concluding remark 2
  3. 3. The Visual World
  4. 4.  Vision  Human visual intelligence  The visual world
  5. 5. Human Vision  400nm-700nm  See color, depth etc  Not perfect
  6. 6. Human Visual intelligence The ecological approach to visual perception (Gibson, 1979) James J. Gibson Human visual intelligence is the ability to utilize the direct or indirect products or by-products of human vision (Rha, 2007) I. Rha
  7. 7. Human Visual intelligence  Human Eyes plus human brain  Interpretation, operation, and creation  Rha, 2007  Generative, Psycho-motor, Instrumental, Proactive, Representational visualization Rha etal. 2009
  8. 8. The visual world
  9. 9. The visual world “The visual world can be described in many ways, but its most fundamental properties seem to be these: it is extended in depth; it is upright, stable, and without boundaries; it is colored, shadowed, illuminated, and textured; it is composed of surfaces, edges, shapes, and interspaces; finally, and most important of all, it is filled with things which have meanings.” Gibson (1950), p.3
  10. 10. The visual world “The visual world can be described in many ways, but its most fundamental properties seem to be these: it is extended in depth; it is upright, stable, and without boundaries; it is colored, shadowed, illuminated, and textured; it is composed of surfaces, edges, shapes, and interspaces; finally, and most important of all, it is filled with things which have meanings.” Gibson (1950), p.3
  11. 11. The visual world “The visual world can be described in many ways, but its most fundamental properties seem to be these: it is extended in depth; it is upright, stable, and without boundaries; it is colored, shadowed, illuminated, and textured; it is composed of surfaces, edges, shapes, and interspaces; finally, and most important of all, it is filled with things which have meanings.” Gibson (1950), p.3
  12. 12. The visual world “The visual world can be described in many ways, but its most fundamental properties seem to be these: it is extended in depth; it is upright, stable, and without boundaries; it is colored, shadowed, illuminated, and textured; it is composed of surfaces, edges, shapes, and interspaces; finally, and most important of all, it is filled with things which have meanings.” Gibson (1950), p.3
  13. 13. The visual world “We believe that we see a complete, dynamic picture of a stable, uniformly detailed, and colourful world, but [o]ur stable visual world may be constructed out of a brief retinal image and a very sketchy, higher-level representation along with a pop-out mechanism to redirect attention. The richness of our visual world is, to this extent, an illusion.” Susan Blackmore & her collegues (1995), p.1075
  14. 14. The visual world “We believe that we see a complete, dynamic picture of a stable, uniformly detailed, and colourful world, but [o]ur stable visual world may be constructed out of a brief retinal image and a very sketchy, higher-level representation along with a pop-out mechanism to redirect attention. The richness of our visual world is, to this extent, an illusion.” Susan Blackmore & her collegues (1995), p.1075
  15. 15. The Visual World  Illusion? 21
  16. 16. The Visual World 22
  17. 17. The Visual World  How Vision works?  David Hubel & Torsten Wiesel - 1981 Nobel Prize - The columnar organization of primary visual cortex was first described 23
  18. 18. The Visual World The visual is not perfect. 24
  19. 19. The Visual World “ ”
  20. 20. “ I lost my parents due to AIDS …. We need your Help!! ”
  21. 21. “ I want to go back to school and study ag ain…. Help us Rebuild our School! ”
  22. 22. The Visual World “ ”
  23. 23. The Visual World The visual is not perfect. 29
  24. 24. The old and new Visual World 30
  25. 25. The old and new Visual World “How do we differentiate?” 31
  26. 26. The old and new Visual World 32
  27. 27. The old and new Visual World “How do we differentiate?” 33
  28. 28. The old and new Visual World “How do we differentiate?” 34
  29. 29. Old Visual World
  30. 30. The Old Visual World  Humans saw what existed in the nature  Direct Perception  Theory of Affordance  James J. Gibson (1950). “The Perception of The Visual World” 36
  31. 31. The Old Visual World  Affordance “The affordances of the environment are what it offers the animal, what it provides or furnishes, either for good or ill.” Gibson (1979), p.127 37
  32. 32. The Old Visual World  Affordance  Norman (1988) - “The Design of Everyday Things” 38
  33. 33. The Old Visual World  Affordance 39
  34. 34. The Old Visual World 40
  35. 35. The Old Visual World 41
  36. 36. The Old Visual World 42
  37. 37. “However…there were extensions of the visual world beyond the human eyes could see…”
  38. 38. The Old Visual World  Real objects  Color, Shape, contour  Humans saw what existed in the nature  Analogue is the basis  Requires interpretation and reaction
  39. 39. New Visual World
  40. 40. New Visual World  Cartoons 54
  41. 41. New Visual World  Computer graphics Star Wars 1977 55
  42. 42. New Visual World  Computer graphics & Robots Jurassic Park 1993 56
  43. 43. New Visual World  3D Animations Toystory 1993 57
  44. 44. New Visual World  3D & 4D Computer graphics Avatar 2009 58
  45. 45. New Visual World  3D virtual world Second Life 59
  46. 46. New Visual World  Augmented Reality 60
  47. 47. New Visual World  Virtual Reality 61
  48. 48. New Visual World  Hidden affordance Perceptual Information  Gaver (1991) No Hidden Affordance Correct Rejection Yes Perceptible Affordance False Affordance Yes No Affordance 62
  49. 49. New Visual World  Various tools contribute to the amplification of human vision  The feature, “digital”, allow us to expand our visual world beyond the physical objects and nature, and actively create a new visual environment for ourselves  Digital is the basis  Recquires understanding and participation 63
  50. 50. The New Visual World => old and new visual world
  51. 51. Why Should We Care?
  52. 52. Learning is Changing
  53. 53. “Visual world?”
  54. 54.  Massive participation  The public actively participates in consumption and creation of visual data  Digital cameras, Mobile phones  Youtube, Ted, Facebook, KaKaoTalk, etc.  --uploads… 72
  55. 55. 74
  56. 56.  New visual expressions  The emergence of expressions blending a new form of language, which results from mixed use of oral and literal expressions in online communications, with visual representations can be understood as a cultural change 75
  57. 57.  New visual expressions blending orality and literacy 76
  58. 58. Pictograms 77
  59. 59.  Diversity of Data Visualization  It is easy to encounter visual representations of not only those objects that are visible in real life, but also even the unseen objects 78
  60. 60. Graphs Diagrams 79
  61. 61.  Diversified forms of visual objects Moving texts Photos of real objects 80
  62. 62. 3D movies Mind map 81
  63. 63.  Text as visual object 82
  64. 64. Why are We Interested?
  65. 65. Why are We Interested?
  66. 66. The New Visual World and Future Education Design
  67. 67. Future Education: What are we striving for?
  68. 68. Future Competencies  What are we striving for? Partnership for 21st Century Skills • • • Learning and Innovation Skills Life and Career Skills Information, Media, Technology Skills European Commission Key Competences • • • • • • • KERIS 21st Century Learner Competencies Communication • Basic competencies in mathematics, science, • an technology Digital competence • Learning skills Social and civic competences Cultural awareness and expression Sense of initiative and entrepreneurship 87 Ability development competencies Character building competencies Career enhancement competencies
  69. 69. Future Competencies in Summary • Critical thinking & Problem solving • ICT Literacy, Digital Competency • Communication, Collaboration, • Social & Cross-Cultural Competences • Initiative & Self-direction, Learning to learn • Flexibility , Creativity • Artistic thinking, Media and Art literacy • Care, Whole-heartedness, Ethics • Multi-disciplinary Competencies
  70. 70. Provide access to quality learning tools or technology resources Engage learners in the tasks that provoke critical thinking using visual tools which virtualize, simulate, augment, and amplify what is invisible or inexistent.
  71. 71. Provide opportunities to learn by producing visuals and using digital tools which communicate, collaborate, and share knowledge with others.
  72. 72. Expose learners in a multi-cultural digital environment and help them interact with diverse persons while acquiring social skills
  73. 73. - Provide opportunities to express individual perspectives - Value and reward creative and flexible approach
  74. 74. - Stimulate multiple senses and provide opportunities to express in diverse modalities and to appreciate multi-modal / synesthetic artifacts
  75. 75. - Value emotion, care, whole-heartedness, ethics and trust - Provide relevant tasks
  76. 76. Provide multi-disciplinary learning tasks interacting with multi-disciplinary professionals using both digital and analogue approaches
  77. 77. to be helpful for designing future education… We need to…
  78. 78. to be helpful for designing future education… We need to…  Aware / Understand  Use / Apply  Find / Create The New Visual World.
  79. 79. Aware / Understand
  80. 80. BASICS
  81. 81. BASICS
  82. 82. BASICS
  83. 83. BASICS 106
  84. 84. BASICS 107
  85. 85. BASICS 108
  86. 86. BASICS More… 109
  87. 87. Recent Development 110
  88. 88. Flipgrid (video discussions) http://flipgrid.com/info/
  89. 89. Google Hangouts Class Sync Collaboration and Disc ussion (Spring, 2013)
  90. 90. An interactive timeline http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/in teractive/2011/mar/22/middle-eastprotest-interactive-timeline
  91. 91. Recent Development More… 114
  92. 92. Use / Apply
  93. 93. More…
  94. 94. Find / Create
  95. 95. Visual Organizers Prof. Han, Ahnna Associate Professor Catholic University of Daegu Instructional Design Human Visual Intelligence Teaching & Learning Method Gamification    Develop a tool for web information visualization, namely Visual Organizer Visualizing electronic texts Advance awareness of structure and comprehension of contents on electronic documents Han, A. H. 2006. Design and Utilization of the Visual Organizers in Web-Based Learning
  96. 96. Visual Design for Digital Text Structure Dr. Sung, Eunmo Instructional System Design Sciences of Learning and Teaching Human Visual Intelligence Educational Smart Media Human Performance Technology   Design instructional interfaces on e-Learning Visual navigating aids and signaling aids in an eLearning system - Reduce extraneous processing - Manage essential processing - Foster generative processing Sung, E. 2009. A Study of Visual Design Principles on Digital Text Structure for Developing e-Learning Contents
  97. 97. Visual design for digital text Dr. Jin, Sung-Hee  Development of two structure design guidelines and two selective-attention design guidelines  Better text structure understanding , essential contents comprehension and usability of digital text Jin, S. (2009). A study on visual transformation of digital text for enhancing text comprehension
  98. 98. Visual Narrative Dr. Byun, Hyunjung Instructional Design Educational Media & Technology Human Visual Intelligence Higher order thinking skills Quality in higher education    Design Principles of Visual Narrative Advance accuracy and efficiency for learning procedural knowledge Visualizing operational information Byun, H. J. 2011. Design principles of visual narrative for learning procedural knowledge
  99. 99. Visual Summary Dr. Lee, Jihyun Instructional Design New Media for Learning Human Visual Intelligence Brain-based Learning Design Teacher Education, Higher Ed.    A visual organizer with a summarizing function Diagrammatically organizes and integrates essential content of the preceding texts into a comprehensible whole Utilizes the natural meanings of spatial properties and dynamic interactive technologies 15 page-long Text Lee, J. (2012). Development of a visual summarizer design model for digital learning.
  100. 100. Fantasy in the Educational Context Principles Dr. Kim, Insu Category Subcategory •Human Visual Intelligence •Fantasy storytelling •Creative thinking •Behavioral Intentions to Educational Media use Distortion of being Derivation Distortion of time and space Distortion of material Embodiment Hyper-realization Embodiment of an abstract idea to fantastic space Embodiment of an abstract idea to fantastic being Physical experience of fantastic events Descriptive experience of fantastic events Concealment of learning purposes Composing  Storytelling Harmony with learning material and fantasy setting  Exploring the factors and the principles of the fantasy as design strategy for educational environment Identifying six factors (fantastic space/time, fantastic being, insight into origin, insight into value, novelty, affinity) with three categories. Kim, I. S. 2008. A Study on the Factors and the Principles of the Fantasy in the Educational Context
  101. 101. Visualization Process Dr. Heo, Gyun Computer & Education Smart Media for Learning Longitudinal & Comparative Study for Learning    Analysis of Visualization Process of verbal information Expert has a unique process named NVD( Novel Visual Decision). Visual Task Analysis was developed and applied for finding visualization process Heo, G. 2006. Visualization process of verbal information through the protocol analysis
  102. 102. Structure of Human Visual Intelligence Dr. Ilju Rha Prof. of Education, SNU Educational Technology   Develop a hypothetical framework of the functional structure of human visual intelligence Suggests three dimensional model of Human Visual Intelligence Rha, I. 2007. Human visual intelligence and the territory of educational technology research
  103. 103. More…
  104. 104. Conclusion
  105. 105. The New Visual World
  106. 106. Design of The New Education
  107. 107.  OECD Schooling for Tomorrow  Attempt to envision the future for education and to prepare strategies for future schooling  Six scenarios in three clusters - Maintaining the status quo - Re-schooling - De-schooling 144
  108. 108.  OECD Schooling for Tomorrow (오헌석, 이예경, 윤순경, 2009) 145
  109. 109. “How do we differentiate?” 148
  110. 110. The visual world in the Future?
  111. 111. Thank You! Dr. Ilju Rha iljurha@snu.ac.kr Seoul National University, Korea 150
  112. 112. Special thanks to professor Curtis J. Bonk, Indiana University for the sharing of his `World is Open` resources.

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