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Glen alleman agile 04 ev+agile=success
 

Glen alleman agile 04 ev+agile=success

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Updated version of agile and EVM

Updated version of agile and EVM

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    Glen alleman agile 04 ev+agile=success Glen alleman agile 04 ev+agile=success Presentation Transcript

    • Thank you for having me this morning.You’ve heard many speakers address wayof developing software using agiledevelopment methods.That is not the topic of this briefing.I’m going to introduce a parallel topic tothe development of software using agilemethods.This topic starts and ends with therequirement – a Federal AcquisitionRegulation requirements – for theapplication of Earned Value Managementfor programs greater than $20M and forthe use of a DCMA validated system forprograms greater than $50M.We’ll see the sources of this guidance in amoment. But no matter what the guidancesays, how it is applied – or not applied –I’m going to try and convince you thatEarned Value Management is a good thingin the context of Agile SoftwareDevelopment and the directive that comesform the NDAA 2010, Section 804.1Integrating Agile with EVMGlen B. Alleman, Niwot Ridge, LLCEVM World, 2013May 29-31, 2013Naples Florida
    • Before any of the current “agile”development methods were around,Earned Value Management providedinformation for planning and controllingcomplex projects by measuring how much"value was produced for a given cost in aperiod of time. With the connection to theBusiness Value in agile, both technicalperformance and business performancecan be used to guide the performance ofan enterprise IT project.The concept of Probability of ProgramSuccess is applied to other DoDAcquisition process in the Air Force, Army,and Navy. It asks and answers the question“what are the key performanceparameters (KPP) for the success of theprogram?”While agile’s contribution to thedevelopment of software is the topic ofmany of the speaker, I’d like to introducethe notion that projects and programs inthe US Department of Defense are stillsubject to the Federal AcquisitionRegulation (FAR) and Defense FederalAcquisition Regulation (DFAR) once theprogram has reached a predefined dollarvalue.At some point in the IT procurementprocess, it is likely a DoD IT program willcross that threshold.2Integrating Agile with EVMGlen B. Alleman, Niwot Ridge, LLCEVM World, 2013May 29-31, 2013Naples Florida
    • The PoPS Operations Guide for ALTESS isshown highlighted here.Starting at the top means asking a simple,yet powerful question, of any procurementprocesses. The two documents with largerborders are guidance from the ITinitiatives. The other documents provideactionable outcomes for “increasing theprobability of program success”What is the probability of success?This is a legitimate question for anyendeavor that evolves risk.The processes and methods beingdescribed over the 3 days of thisconference should be asking andanswering the question: how can we increase the probability ofprogram success PoPS? How can we “connect the dots”between the proposed methods – agilemethods – and the increase in PoPS? Same question needs to be asked ofEarned Value, or for that matter anyprocess – existing or proposed.3Integrating Agile with EVMGlen B. Alleman, Niwot Ridge, LLCEVM World, 2013May 29-31, 2013Naples Florida
    • You will hear or you will have heard lots ofdefinitions of Agile this week.Here’s mine. Well it’s not actually mine. Itis John Goodpastuer’s.John’s book Project Management the AgileWay, is one of those sleeper texts that isnot on the cover of software magazines, orin the agile press our blogosphere.Unlike many agile books that tell you howto write software using agile softwaredevelopment methods, John tells us howto manage projects that have agiledevelopment methods embedded in them.John’s book is one place to look for EarnedValue methods on agile softwaredevelopment projects.4Integrating Agile with EVMGlen B. Alleman, Niwot Ridge, LLCEVM World, 2013May 29-31, 2013Naples Florida
    • Before we go any further, let’s establishthe connection between the need foragility in DoD IT procurement and EarnedValue Management.Page 30, Table 3 of A New Approach forDelivering Information TechnologyCapabilities in the Department of Defense.this document, which you can find on theweb, is from the Deputy Secretary ofDefense, Office of the Deputy ChiefManagement Officer,5Integrating Agile with EVMGlen B. Alleman, Niwot Ridge, LLCEVM World, 2013May 29-31, 2013Naples Florida
    • With that in mind, let’s set the stage howwe arrived at the state of softwaredevelopment projects. This by the way isnot unique to software development inthe DoD or any government agency. Or forthat matter other programs in thegovernment. Or finally for IT programs inthe private sector.This “road map” is all too common inalmost every non-trivial softwaredevelopment or complex systemdevelopment project or program.While this picture tells a story, it is morecomplex than this simple linear sequenceof events.The source of the problem is beyond anyone solution. It is beyond Earned Value. Itis beyond Agile Software development. Itmay be beyond our ability to managecomplex systems.6Integrating Agile with EVMGlen B. Alleman, Niwot Ridge, LLCEVM World, 2013May 29-31, 2013Naples Florida
    • There are lots of definitions of agile. Mostcome from the software developmentworld. But let’s have a definition that ismeaningful to the problem at hand. Thatproblem is defined in Section804’s instructions. If we haven’t heard ofNDAA Section 804, it’s the NationalDefense Authorization Act 2010, Section804. we’ll see the details in a bit, but fornow Section 804 says: SEC. 804. IMPLEMENTATION OF NEWACQUISITION PROCESS FORINFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SYSTEMS. The Secretary of Defense shall developand implement a new acquisitionprocess for information technologysystems. The acquisition processdeveloped and implemented pursuant tothis subsection shall, to the extentdetermined appropriate by the Secretary Be based on the recommendations inchapter 6 of the March 2009 report ofthe Defense Science Board Task Force onDepartment of Defense Policies andProcedures for the Acquisition ofInformation Technology; and(2) be designed to include— (A) early and continual involvement ofthe user; (B) multiple, rapidly executed incrementsor releases of capability; (C) early, successive prototyping tosupport an evolutionary approach; and (D) a modular, open-systems approach.The last four phrases should be soundfamiliar to any of you practicing agilesoftware development.7Integrating Agile with EVMGlen B. Alleman, Niwot Ridge, LLCEVM World, 2013May 29-31, 2013Naples Florida
    • In our standard software developmentdomain, in the DOD or in most commercialenterprises, what done looks like is amoving target.This is no only the norm, in many cases itis beneficial, since the customer may notknow or even have to ability to know whatdone looks like in definitive terms needs towrite a functional specification for thesoftware.So we need a new definition of what donelooks like. a definition based on theneeded capabilities first. And only themcan we search for the techncialrequirements.It is assumed, and needs to be statedagain, that these programs are usingEarned Value Management. That is whythis briefing is being given at an EarnedValue Management conference, ratherthan an Agile Software Developmentconference.So we’re using EV on our program withagile development as the engineeringmethod, but we don’t have a definitivetechncial specification.Agile provide a solution to this problem. Itproduces working software in incrementalsteps against a top level “neededcapabilities” description .Integrating Agile with EVMGlen B. Alleman, Niwot Ridge, LLCEVM World, 2013May 29-31, 2013Naples Florida8
    • Let’s bring the discussion back to somesimple, clear, and concise terms.What are we after when I suggest EarnedValue Management can be used with AgileDevelopment?Actually in the Federal procurementdomain, it’s agile being used with EarnedValue.The answer is “how can we recognize thatvalue – business value – is being EARNEDin exchange for spending time andmoney?”This is a core question, in the same way toprevious question – what is the probabilityof program success – is a core question.If we proceed further without understandthe importance of these core questions,we have heard and seen some very cleavertools and approaches. But we won’tunderstand WHY they are cleaver. Andmost importantly if they are in fact theappropriate approaches to the problem.And we all understand the problem right?We’re over budget, behind schedule, andoff the technical performance measureson many programs in IT and other DoDprocurement domains.9Integrating Agile with EVMGlen B. Alleman, Niwot Ridge, LLCEVM World, 2013May 29-31, 2013Naples Florida
    • So if we’re looking for a higher motivationin our search for corrective actions tobeing over budget and behind schedule,we need look no further than the currentNDAA.Here’s the actual worlds from the NDAA. Ifyou have not read this, it wouldworthwhile. The NDAA is interesting inthat it is a “directive” from SecDef to theDoD IT community.It provides clear and concise statementsabout what to search for. A, B, and C say itin clear terms. Early and continuous user involvement Rapidly executed increments orreleased of capability. Capability is aDoD term (Capability Based Planning isa DoD process). Capability means “I cando something with the thing you justgave me.” Early successive prototyping to supportan evolutionary approach – means whatit says. Early – not late, evolutionary –not big bang, prototyping – partiallycomplete things that can be examinedto see if that’s what we really want.10Integrating Agile with EVMGlen B. Alleman, Niwot Ridge, LLCEVM World, 2013May 29-31, 2013Naples Florida
    • Before we start done the path tointegrating Agile with Earned ValueManagement, we need to recognize thatsimply sewing Agile with EVM will notresult in usable approach to improving theprobability of program success.To do this, we need the make connectionsbetween the practices of EVM with theAgile practices.First let’s address the myths first, thenconnect the dots between EVM and Agile.Integrating Agile with EVMGlen B. Alleman, Niwot Ridge, LLCEVM World, 2013May 29-31, 2013Naples Florida11
    • So let’s change course here for a bit.There are lots of “myths” around agilesoftware development. Just like there arelots of myths around Earned Value andEarned Value Management.Let’s look at some of these to get a senseif these myths have any validity to them.If not let’s bust them.If so, let’s use them to makeimprovements in our understanding ofwhat to do next to Increase the Probabilityof Program Success.Remember that phrase. That’s the phrasewe want to start using to keep everyonehonest.How does your suggested improvementIncrease the Probability of ProgramSuccess?12Integrating Agile with EVMGlen B. Alleman, Niwot Ridge, LLCEVM World, 2013May 29-31, 2013Naples Florida
    • Let’s start with some myths no theDefense Acquisition side.These come from then Capt. Dan Ward,now Lt. Col Dan Ward, USAF.Dan and I have shared ideas for awhilearound what it means to be agile andadaptive in the weapons systemprocurement business.Dan writes articles for the Acquisition,Technology and Logistics journal – a realpage turner if anyone is interested.Dan also has a Blog and writes booksabout management, especially programmanagement.Most of Dan’s work can be found on theDefense Acquisition University’sCommunity of Practice portal.These myths are self evident. Meaningwhen you statement them, you can figurepretty quickly if they can be “busted” ornot. There are 6 here, all “busted.”13Integrating Agile with EVMGlen B. Alleman, Niwot Ridge, LLCEVM World, 2013May 29-31, 2013Naples Florida
    • Here’s some more myths around US DoDsoftware development programs.The Myth on the left is a popularstatement outside the DoD.The “busted” statement on the right is theunderstand from those of us working theprograms inside the DoD contractors.These myth prevent the joining of agileand EVM from both sides. Actual DODprograms have emergent requirementsand are managed using an “increasingmaturity” process in the IMP/IMS.Rarely would all requirements be definedon day one. Just like Agile, assessing whatthe customer “actually” wants as productsare developed.14Integrating Agile with EVMGlen B. Alleman, Niwot Ridge, LLCEVM World, 2013May 29-31, 2013Naples Florida
    • Before we get into the details, or run outof time for getting into the details, let’slook ahead of how to “connect the dots”between agile process and an enterpriseprocess framework.We’re not yet ready to do the same forEarned Value, but this is the basis of thatcoming step.These come from a Scott Ambler articleand John Goodpastuer’s book ProjectManagement the Agile Way. John’s book isone of the best sources of agile practicesin the presence of existing enterprisemanagement processes. In this caseEarned Value Management.15Integrating Agile with EVMGlen B. Alleman, Niwot Ridge, LLCEVM World, 2013May 29-31, 2013Naples Florida
    • In the presence of all these myths –procurement, DoD IT, and Agile SoftwareDevelopment, here is ample evidence DoDIT is headed down the path of agileacquisition and development.Mrs. McGrath spoke at a recent AFCEANOVA lunch I attended and laid out whereshe was going in her office.But we still need to “connect the dots”between the Governance of DoD ITprograms and the technical activities wefind in the development of software. Asmentioned earlier “writing software” isnot the same as “managing the writing ofsoftware.”No matter the examples in the commercialworlds, where the development teams are“self managed,” that is likely too big a leapfor FAR / DFAR compliant programs totake. There will always be the requirementfor Program Management processes basedon Earned Value for contract awardsgreater than $20M.16Integrating Agile with EVMGlen B. Alleman, Niwot Ridge, LLCEVM World, 2013May 29-31, 2013Naples Florida
    • So now that we’ve had a good tour of agilesome myths busted or confirmed, and theinteraction of agile with the project andthe development of software, let’s revisitthat some guidance that is in place nomatter what software development we’reusing now or want to use in the future.We come to the elephant in the room.For programs in the DoD (or for thatmatter any government agency) that haveaward values greater than $20M the FAR,DFAR, and OMB (White House) requiresEarned Value management, guided byANSI 748-B.I’ll wait for the shudder in the room tosettle (if there is one).The two logos on the left are from theDefense Contract Management Agencyand the Defense Contract Audit Agency.They are accountable for looking after themoney issued to contractors for theacquisition of services and materials in theUS Government. They are one of thoseoverworked agencies that are alwayslooking for ways to make your lifeunpleasant at inconvenient times.They do this with a “politically correctword” surveillance – which mean audit –enabled by the regulations and guidancelisted at the bottom of this chart.17Integrating Agile with EVMGlen B. Alleman, Niwot Ridge, LLCEVM World, 2013May 29-31, 2013Naples Florida
    • Let’s take another turn here, away fro allthe regulation, audit and surveillance stufffor a minute. Back to the theme of thisconference.The agile manifesto was the start of theprinciples of agile. The manifesto was firstseen an a disruptive. I spoke at an earlyagile conference while I was a programmanager at a multi-billion dollarDepartment of Energy program, when theagile thought leaders and process ownerswhere dominated by individualdevelopers. There was a definiteantiestablishment feel in Salt Lake City inJune of 2003.We’ve come a long since then. The“mainstream” has started to absorb manyof the concepts. We’re here today talkingabout agile software development in thedomain of DoD IT.We’re early in the cycle, but there is now“past performance” that can be examinedto connections to this domain (DoD) andthe context of that domain (IT). On page51 of Boyd’s treatise is the section “TheDefense Turn,” possible used by Dr.Carter’s quote of “turning inside the loopof unfolding events.”18Integrating Agile with EVMGlen B. Alleman, Niwot Ridge, LLCEVM World, 2013May 29-31, 2013Naples Florida
    • We’re getting close to the half way point inthis briefing, so let’s have a process check.First where have we come from? We’veseen agile is being mentioned inside thewalls of the DoD.We’ve seen there are external guidingregulations and documents that impactDoD procurement no matter what methodis being used to develop the software.So let’s take the first attempt to “connectthe dots,” between those two worlds.Here’s three ways they can be connected. Measuring progress Forecasting future progress Integrating the performance reportingin a form needed by the government.19Integrating Agile with EVMGlen B. Alleman, Niwot Ridge, LLCEVM World, 2013May 29-31, 2013Naples Florida
    • The answers to those three questioncomes down to “measurement.”Measurement sounds like a non-agileword. It can certainly be done in a non-agile way. But agile itself has manymeasurement processes.Velocity is one that is related to EarnedValue. I say related. Not the same as. Andrelated itself needs a definition. Velocityand Earned Value are probably cousinsrather than siblings.But both approaches – and this is themessage of this briefing – is that“measurement” is at the heart of anyapproach to Increasing the Probability ofProgram Success.20Integrating Agile with EVMGlen B. Alleman, Niwot Ridge, LLCEVM World, 2013May 29-31, 2013Naples Florida
    • One of the difficulties with the AgileManifesto besides the term “over,” is it isnot directly actionable.If we look at these 12 “principles” andremove the term “agile” there is not oneof them that we would not want on anyproject.How would not want… To satisfy the customer with early andcontinuous delivery of value To have business and developers worktogether. To frequently deliver working products. To have continuous attention totechnical excellence21Integrating Agile with EVMGlen B. Alleman, Niwot Ridge, LLCEVM World, 2013May 29-31, 2013Naples Florida
    • There are 11 critical Earned ValueManagement processes for project success1-Define the WBS for the deliverables2-Identify the organization of the staff thatproduces the deliverables5-Integrate these two to identify theaccountable person for the deliverable6-Schedule the work7-Idenitify the Products and Milestones inthe schedule8-Set Time Phased Budget for each WorkPackage16-Record Direct Costs so we know howmuch we’re spending23-Determine Variances to see if we’refollowing the plan25-Sum Data and Variances so we can seeif the project is making progress26-Manage Action Plans for fixing thevariances28-Incorporate Changes22Integrating Agile with EVMGlen B. Alleman, Niwot Ridge, LLCEVM World, 2013May 29-31, 2013Naples Florida
    • The connections between earned valuemanagement and agile softwaredevelopment are made at the workpackage level. In agile the list of “features”to be developed is assumed to be present.The source of those “feature” comes fromthe customer. In the EVM world, those“features” need to be baselined in somemanner for EV to have any benefit.Changing the baseline on a whim is notjust bad EVM, it makes EVM worthless,since the real value of EVM comes frommeasuring progress against baseline – theoriginal plan.The plan can change of course, and manytimes it does. But those changes arerecognized as a “re-baseline” and washout the variances used to manage theproject.Integrating Agile with EVMGlen B. Alleman, Niwot Ridge, LLCEVM World, 2013May 29-31, 2013Naples Florida23
    • So let’s look again at the top levelconnections between Earned ValueManagement – as practiced using EVMguidance from ANSI-748-B, DOE, and thePMI EVM Practice Guide.If you make up your own practices, that’s adifferent story.The 11 core practices of Earned ValueManagement have strong connections tothe practices of agile development.24Integrating Agile with EVMGlen B. Alleman, Niwot Ridge, LLCEVM World, 2013May 29-31, 2013Naples Florida
    • But while we’re getting all excited aboutconnecting agile into EVM projects, let’snot forget that we are managing otherpeople money with these processes.The Business Management Processes arethe over arching framework for anyproject.Each of these processes must be in placeand applied – successfully applied – if weare to have any hope of success on ourproject.25Integrating Agile with EVMGlen B. Alleman, Niwot Ridge, LLCEVM World, 2013May 29-31, 2013Naples Florida
    • It turns out of course that this idea ofincremental development, emergingrequirements and measures of tangibleprogress to plan have been around awhile.We’ve forgotten about them for a varietyof reasons, not the least of which is wedon’t use history to inform the present orfuture.Like Santanyana says "Those who cannotremember the past are condemned torepeat it.”26Integrating Agile with EVMGlen B. Alleman, Niwot Ridge, LLCEVM World, 2013May 29-31, 2013Naples Florida
    • So we’re back to the beginning.Here’s our call to action.27Integrating Agile with EVMGlen B. Alleman, Niwot Ridge, LLCEVM World, 2013May 29-31, 2013Naples Florida
    • The OODA Loop can be applied to anyproblem. Agile integration with EVMsystem is one.There are already several “agile”paradigms in DoD. One of the best know isCol. John Boyds OODA process. Boyd’s“Organic Design for Command andControl,” “A Discourse on Winning andLoosing,” “Patterns of Conflict,” and thepaper that started it all “”Aerial AttackStudy,” 1964.The OODA paradigm informs the agileconversation in a broader context of DoDvocabulary.28Integrating Agile with EVMGlen B. Alleman, Niwot Ridge, LLCEVM World, 2013May 29-31, 2013Naples Florida
    • The notion of product development usinga linear “waterfall” process in thegovernment is log gone. Starting with theremoval of this approach in DODI 5000.01,where spiral was introduced. In DODI5000.02,http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/500002p.pdf,Iterative processes are used.Since all projects involve complex, highrisk, and fast moving requirements, agile iaa natural addition to the currentprocurement processes.Integrating Agile with EVMGlen B. Alleman, Niwot Ridge, LLCEVM World, 2013May 29-31, 2013Naples Florida29
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    • With the 11 EVMS Guidelines, let’s look athow Agile can be connected to them.The next section shows how to do this.32Integrating Agile with EVMGlen B. Alleman, Niwot Ridge, LLCEVM World, 2013May 29-31, 2013Naples Florida
    • Guideline 1 creates the Work BreakdownStructure for the deliverables. The WBS isa product focused view of the project. Itshows what is being delivered and howthose deliverables are structured betweenparent and child.At the terminal nodes of the WBS are theWork Packages that contain the workeffort to produce the deliverables.The WBS is used to assign budget for thework efforts and collect costs against thatbudget.The Earned Value Management processesasses the “earned value,” BCWP using theWBS.With these three numbers, forecasts offuture performance can be made for eachdeliverable.The WBS is not a decomposition of thefunctions in the project. Design, Code,Test, would not be seen in the WBS. Onlyproducts and the services needed toproduce those products.33Integrating Agile with EVMGlen B. Alleman, Niwot Ridge, LLCEVM World, 2013May 29-31, 2013Naples Florida
    • With the deliverables defined, we nowneed to know who is going to do the work.On agile teams this is straight forward,since the team members are known andare assigned to the project for longperiods of time.On government programs, this is notalways the case, so the connectionbetween agile and GL 2 is easy.34Integrating Agile with EVMGlen B. Alleman, Niwot Ridge, LLCEVM World, 2013May 29-31, 2013Naples Florida
    • With the products and the staff buildingthe products we need to connect the dots.On single agile project this is simple, butfor multiple teams these connections areuseful, since resource allocation will likelybe an issue.35Integrating Agile with EVMGlen B. Alleman, Niwot Ridge, LLCEVM World, 2013May 29-31, 2013Naples Florida
    • In agile scheduling is straight forward, ormay appear to be so.In fact on agile programs, scheduling isneeded on government programs.Contractually the work needs to producesome minimal set of capabilities in aplanned period of time for a plannedbudget.Knowing when the work products will beproduced, for what effort, and by whom ispart of scheduling.36Integrating Agile with EVMGlen B. Alleman, Niwot Ridge, LLCEVM World, 2013May 29-31, 2013Naples Florida
    • Planning in agile starts at the top. Whatcapabilities are needed for the customerto consider the project a success.This Epic planning is nearly identical to theCapabilities Based Planning process foundon government programs.37Integrating Agile with EVMGlen B. Alleman, Niwot Ridge, LLCEVM World, 2013May 29-31, 2013Naples Florida
    • Budgeting in agile is level of effort if theteam content doesn’t change.What is different is the planned outcomesand the absorption of the budget usingthose fixed resources.Scaling the agile team up and down andproducing a budget profile, does not fit theparadigm of agile.So with a “flat spread” budget, theindependent variable is the teams capacityfor work.38Integrating Agile with EVMGlen B. Alleman, Niwot Ridge, LLCEVM World, 2013May 29-31, 2013Naples Florida
    • Direct costs are dominated by labor.With a flat spread of labor, this is simple.39Integrating Agile with EVMGlen B. Alleman, Niwot Ridge, LLCEVM World, 2013May 29-31, 2013Naples Florida
    • The variances in agile are around theproduction of outcomes for the flat spreadwork effort.Adjusting the “Capacity for Work,” startswith assessing the current production ofoutcomes from that work.40Integrating Agile with EVMGlen B. Alleman, Niwot Ridge, LLCEVM World, 2013May 29-31, 2013Naples Florida
    • Assessment of performance to plan is thebasis of any credible project managementmethod.Agile is no different. How many features, stories, outcomeswere planned? How many were produced? With this variance, what changes needto be made to the team to stay on plan?41Integrating Agile with EVMGlen B. Alleman, Niwot Ridge, LLCEVM World, 2013May 29-31, 2013Naples Florida
    • With the information from GL 25, how canthe team get back on plan, when they fallshort of the committed outcomes.42Integrating Agile with EVMGlen B. Alleman, Niwot Ridge, LLCEVM World, 2013May 29-31, 2013Naples Florida
    • Management of the project meansmanagement decisions need to be made.Here is where that takes place.43Integrating Agile with EVMGlen B. Alleman, Niwot Ridge, LLCEVM World, 2013May 29-31, 2013Naples Florida
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    • Here are some popular myths about agilesoftware development, itself.Confirmed In the DoD domain and specific context,a specification of what “done” looks likeis part of the culture and part of thecontracting process for the use of publicmoney. You would not give $10M to a softwaredevelopment firm without a detailed setof capabilities and requirements forwhat you’re expecting to get for yourmoney.Busted The brief will show how to connect EVwith Agile You can measure anything once youdefine the units of measure. In agile thatis working software. Stage gates are the definition ofreleases. There are many aspects of a softwareproject that arent about software. Agile may or may not be quicker, there isno way to have parallel comparisons.Plausible The FAR rules, not agile The less than formal planning processesare sometime problematic The accountability is no formal asrequired by 748B The jury is out on this, although TS (techsolution) is a small part of CMMI This can happen in the absence ofleadership46Integrating Agile with EVMGlen B. Alleman, Niwot Ridge, LLCEVM World, 2013May 29-31, 2013Naples Florida
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    • The four items here are a restatement ofthe formal release.Let’s look again.1. Deliver early and often – these arecore concepts of agile.2. Incremental and iterative is a criticalsuccess factor for any project.3. By rationalize it could mean that thecustomer defines them with face-to-face interaction with the developers.4. The processes, in this case EarnedValue, need to “earn its keep” to beeffective.49Integrating Agile with EVMGlen B. Alleman, Niwot Ridge, LLCEVM World, 2013May 29-31, 2013Naples Florida
    • The introduction of agile to DoD ITacquisition programs comes the party thathas already started. Earned Value forprograms greater than $20M. The WorkBreakdown Structure, Integrated MasterPlan / Integrated Master Schedule(IMP/IMS), DID 81650 Schedule RiskAnalysis, and of course the PerformanceMeasurement Baseline (PMB).50Integrating Agile with EVMGlen B. Alleman, Niwot Ridge, LLCEVM World, 2013May 29-31, 2013Naples Florida
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