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  • 1. With regard to educational status of the respondents, 248 (12.4%) were illiterates, 438(21.8%) have completed primary education, 517(25.7%) finished their middle schooling, 680(33.8%) have completed their schooling and only 125(6.2%) did college education. The reasons for poor educational status of the respondents could be due to   1.  Most of the respondents were dropouts from schools and joined this industry at early stage. 2. They belong to lower middle class and middle class group. The sample includes 2008 cine industrial workers, of which 1802(89.7%) were males and 206(10.3%) were females. The proportion of males is more because in the study, maximum workers were cine technicians. Also in film industry, the ratio of male and female is 1:9 among the union card holders and this ratio is strictly followed in the sample.   About the Sample characteristics-I
  • 2. A majority of the respondents 1711 (85.2%) belong to Tamil Nadu, followed by 209 (10.4%) from Andhra Pradesh, 43(2.1%) from Kerala, 21(1%) from Karnataka and 14 (0.7%) from other states of India. As many as 1335(66.5%) out of 2008 respondents were married, 638(31.8%) were unmarried and 35(1.7%) respondents were separated/divorced/widowed/ living without partner. About the Sample characteristics-II
  • 3.     With regard to type of family, nuclear families dominate as 1256(62.5%) respondents belong to this category. Surprisingly, 339(16.9%) living as single, 347(17.3%) respondents living in a joint family and 30 (1.5%) in extended family. The Indian tradition of living in a joint family is considerably reducing and the westernized system is picking up. About the Sample characteristics-III
  • 4. It is interesting to observe that 1458(72.6%) respondents migrated from one place to another due to various reasons. It is obvious that the profession in which the respondents employed namely the film industry demands migration. A majority of the respondents 1027(51.1%) opinioned that they encountered lots of personal problems, which made them to migrate. Some of the other reasons for migration would be family disturbances, love failure and misunderstandings with family members. Out of 1458 respondents migrated for various reasons, 1070(73.4%) engaged in technical side of film industry, 324(22.2%) engaged in acting. Unfortunately, the employees working in film industry are almost comparable with the workers of unorganized sector. As a matter of fact, 1757(87.5%) respondents have reported that there is no continuous job in a month for them. Because of this pitiable situation, 356(20.3%) indulged in sex work and it is really a worrying factor. Further, 472 (26.9%) have said that they were supported morally and financially by their own family members. Some respondents mortgage their property for their survival to execute their day–to-day routine. About the Sample characteristics-IV
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  • 18.     Sample size (N=2008) Not applicable/No comments/can’t say/Don’t know are excluded for analysis.   Chi-square test for independence of Attributes-I FACTOR DESCRIPTION MALE FEMALE  2 -statistic p-value Marital Status UNMARRIED 563 75         75.142         0.000       MARRIED 1221 114 SEPARATED 9 4 DIVORCED 1 5 WIDOWED 6 7 LIVING WITH PARTNER   2   1 Union Membership No 104 20 6.501 0.011 Yes 1551 156 HOW DID YOU JOIN IN THE FILM INDUSTRY BY THE AGENT- SUB AGENT 92 27         30.032         0.000 DIRECT OFFER 739 70 ADVERTISEMENT 105 12 FAMILY OR RELATIVE 385 33 NEIGHBOURS 11 4 FRIEND 359 47 STRANGERS 20 2
  • 19.   Chi-square test for independence of Attributes-II Sample size (N=2008) Not applicable/No comments/can’t say/Don’t know are excluded for analysis.   FACTOR DESCRIPTION MALE FEMALE  2 -statistic p-value Reasons for Migration       Family disturbance 135 26         12.299         0.031 Personal problems 928 99 Education and Social 59 4 Misunderstandings 23 0 Love failures 21 2 Others 32 1 MIGRATED FOR STUDIES 15 6   8.673   0.013 CINEMA 265 28 ANY JOB 1108 115 MIGRATED FOR CINEMA ACTING 249 75 90.557 0.000 TECHNICAL 1012 58
  • 20.         Chi-square test for independence of Attributes-III FACTOR DESCRIPTION MALE FEMALE  2 -statistic p-value Exploitation: WHY DIDN'T YOU INFORM TO LAW/POLICE/UNION FEAR 242 42     8.554     0.036 CREATE UNNESSARY PROBLEM 743 83 AFFECT SURVIVAL 51 2 NO TRUST ON POLICE 72 12 UTLISTED THE VCTC No 1207 122 4.591 0.032 Yes 493 70 CHOICE OF PARTNERS SPECIFY MALE 28 175   1309.5   0.000 FEMALE 1344 0 EUNUCH 14 2 CHILDREN 5 0
  • 21.     Chi-square test for independence of Attributes-IV FACTOR DESCRIPTION MALE FEMALE  2 -statistic p-value CHILD LABOUR IN FILM INDUSTRY NO 293 21 5.200 0.023 YES 1447 178 FORCED TO COMPENSATE TO ENTER INTO THE FIELD No 1297 126     13.946     0.000     Yes 325 59 SEXUAL ASSULT BEFORE ENTERING No 1351 120 30.228 .000 Yes 378 78 FORCED SEXUAL RELATIONSHIP No 273 20 4.347 .037 Yes 1423 173
  • 22.   Chi-square test for independence of Attributes-V FACTOR DESCRIPTION STI PRESENT STI ABSENT  2 -statistic p-value HOW DID YOU JOIN FI MONEY 5 123   13.287       0.004 SEX 16 94 PIMPING 6 21 GIFTS 6 74   RESULT OF VIOLENCE AND EXPLOITATION PHYSICAL ASSAULT 25 436     42.495           0.00       MENTAL DISTRESS 50 557 LOST DIGNITY 24 443 HEALTH COMPLIANTS 11 140 ALL THE ABOVE 22 71 REINFECTION YES 48 8 453.95 0.00 NO 96 1577
  • 23.   Chi-square test for independence of Attributes-VI FACTOR DESCRIPTION STI PRESENT STI ABSENT  2 -statistic p-value BENEFITS TO PLHAS - UNION YES 46 396 7.846 0.005 NO 90 1313 UTILIZED THE VCTC   YES 113 445 170.147 0.00 NO 34 1288 DEPRESSION/ MENTAL ILLNESS YES 107 1425 4.145 0.042 NO 39 349
  • 24.   Test for the equality of two Population means-I DESCRIPTIVE STATISTICS AGE IN YEARS   MALE FEMALE     Z-value       p-value   INCOME PER MONTH (in RS.)   MALE FEMALE     Z-value       p-value   SAMPLE SIZE 1802 206       3.4       0.001 1754 197       0.198       0.359 MEAN 34.4 32.0 4401.2 4154.8 MEDIAN 34.0 28.0 4000 3500 MODE 25.0 36.0 3000 3000 STD. DEV. 9.2 9.7 3665.4 2570.5 MINIMUM 14 16 500 1000 MAXIMUM 85 65 60000 15000
  • 25.   Test for the equality of two Population means-II DESCRIPTIVE STATISTICS MONEY GIVEN FOR MEMBERSHIP (in RS.)   MALE FEMALE     Z-value       p-value   EXPERIENCE IN YEARS   MALE FEMALE     Z-value       p-value   SAMPLE SIZE 1555 155       -0.164       0.87 1783 202       3.683       0.00 MEAN 19308.6 19621.9 11.4 8.7 MEDIAN 10000 13000 10.0 6.0 MODE 5000 5000 6.0 6.0 STD. DEV. 22975.3 19113.1 8.6 9.8 MINIMUM 500 1000 0 0 MAXIMUM 351000 100000 67 54
  • 26.     Test for the equality of two Population means-III DESCRIPTIVE STATISTICS NO. OF DAYS OF OUTDOOR SHOOTINGS   MALE FEMALE     Z-value       p-value   NO. OF DAYS OF SHOOTINGS IN CHENNAI   MALE FEMALE     Z-value       p-value   SAMPLE SIZE 1408 173       2.003       0.045 1755 197       3.858       0.00 MEAN 8.2 7.55 11.9 10.85 MEDIAN 10.0 8.0 10.0 10.0 MODE 10.0 10.0 10.0 10.0 STD. DEV. 3.8 3.6 4.0 3.6 MINIMUM 0 0 0 1 MAXIMUM 30 20 30 21
  • 27.   Test for the equality of two Population means-IV DESCRIPTIVE STATISTICS AGE OF ENTRY IN FILM     MALE FEMALE     Z-value       p-Value   NO. OF SEXUAL PARTNERS   MALE FEMALE     Z-Value       p-value   SAMPLE SIZE 1705 188       2.432       0.015 1354 162       0.655       0.513 MEAN 23.2 22.1 9.8 9.3 MEDIAN 22.0 21.0 8.0 8.0 MODE 20 20 10 4.0 STD. DEV. 5.9 5.7 8.9 8.7 MINIMUM 0 1 0 1 MAXIMUM 57 47 84.0 51
  • 28. LIST OF DECISION MAKING FACTORS
  • 29. Variation among Factors - CATPCA -Overall
  • 30. Variation among Factors - CATPCA -Males
  • 31. Variation among Factors - CATPCA -Females
  • 32. Ultimate Outcome of CATPCA
  • 33. NPar Tests- Kruskal-Wallis Test
  • 34. Outcome of Kruskal-Wallis test
  • 35. NPar Tests- Kruskal-Wallis Test
  • 36. Outcome of Kruskal-Wallis test
  • 37. The above15 vital factors have been measured on a 5 point rating scale (0-Strongly disagree, 1-Disagree, 2-To some extent agree, 3-Agree, 4-Strongly agree) and are compared with marital status using Kruskal –Wallis test. This non-parametric test has been applied to study which of the factors have different median scores within the three categories of marital status. Out of 15 factors, 6 factors turned out to be statistically significant, they are a3,a6,a9,a10,a14 and a15.   (A3 & A6) Married and separated film industrial workers entered the film industry mainly due to financial problems as the mean rank for these two groups is more than unmarried group (  2 =7.869, p=0.02). On the contrary, unmarried workers have lots of sex related problems than the other two groups (  2 =10.75, p=0.005).   (A9 &A10) The awareness of usage of condoms is more among unmarried film industrial workers than other groups (  2 =8.14, p=0.017). Similarly, unmarried workers protect themselves from HIV+/AIDS which supports the earlier statement. It is to be observed that the mean rank for separated for widowed group is very less and so they face a real health hazards problems particularly sex related problems (  2 =9.008, p=0.011).   (A14 & A15) The mean rank based on median scores is more for married workers towards taking care of their kids and parents compared to other two groups and it is found to be statistically significant (  2 =29.31, p=0.000). On contrary, separated and unmarried workers were happy to be in the film industry than married people (  2 =24.589, p=0.000).     Significant findings of Kruskal-Wallis test
  • 38. Two-group Discriminant and Classification Analysis HISTORY OF STI IN THE PRESENT/PAST: yes = 149; no = 1778 Stepwise Statistics : yes = 149; no = 1778
  • 39. SUMMARY OF CLASSIFICATION ANALYSIS
  • 40. Binary Logistic Regression Model HISTORY OF STI IN THE PRESENT/PAST: yes = 149; no = 1778
  • 41. THANK YOU

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