RAG handout
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Like this? Share it with your network

Share

RAG handout

  • 653 views
Uploaded on

Recurrent Action Grammar:...

Recurrent Action Grammar:
Achieving Acquisition and Fluency in the TPR Classroom
A Complete Beginning Course

Presented by
Elizabeth Kuizenga Romijn

More in: Education
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
653
On Slideshare
653
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
14
Comments
0
Likes
1

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Recurrent Action Grammar Achieving Acquisition and Fluency in the TPR Classroom Presented by Elizabeth Kuizenga Romijn
  • 2. Recurrent Action Grammar is Repetition and Context It is a method of repeating grammar lessons weekly, each time in a different context, in order to reinforce  the grammar in the context of each new lesson. Context Recurrent Action Grammar uses contextual situations, often with props. What is meant by context here   is   language   in   relation   to  physical   activities   in   real   time.   Something   is   actually   happening   in   the  classroom, and the teacher and students refer to the action in the present progressive tense if the action is  occurring at the same time that it is being spoken of, in the future if the action is being planned for later  on, and in the past tense if the action is already completed. With Recurrent Action Grammar, exercises  are   strictly   in   context!   This   ensures   that   the   words   being   uttered   are   always   meaningful   and  communicative, and contribute to true language acquisition every time. Repetition While most language courses have a different vocabulary and a different set of grammar points to be  studied in each chapter or unit, Recurrent Action Grammar repeats the exercise of each grammar point  in   subsequent   chapters,   but   each   time   in   the   context   of   a   new   situation   with   new   vocabulary.   This  consistent repetition of the grammar points as comprehensible aural input ensures actual  acquisition of   them, rather than merely learning about them. Begin with Vocabulary Introduction of the Action Series 1. Setting the Scene—so students understand where they are, who they are. 2. Initial demonstration of series—may be the whole class, or one student responding to the teacher's  imperatives. Makes a strong impression, a vivid image in the students' minds. 3. Group live action—students all respond to the commands—actively use and experience the language  without being required to speak 4. Written copy—students see the words written (omit for pre­adolescents). Strikes students with how much  English they have just understood. 5. Oral repetition and question/answer period—pronunciation practice—students are motivated by  context to focus in and understand and pronounce each word well. 6. Students producing, teacher or other students responding to imperatives—teacher­monitored. 7. Pair­practice—students experience the power of communicating in English and having their  utterances acted upon by another person; something actually occurs in response to their English.
  • 3. Present Progressive Tense Pantomime Game Pantomime, without props, various actions from the series, having the students guess what you're trying  to depict: "What am I doing?' Then call on individuals to show one of the actions, without talking ("Show  me another action from the lesson.") Once they get the hang of the game and are responding well, point  out the formation and meaning of this tense­interrogative and declarative forms. Don't!—Declarative, interrogative, negative forms, contrasted with affirmative and  negative imperatives:  Teacher: Go to the produce section.  Students: [pantomimes walking, pushing grocery cart]  Teacher: Don't go to the bathroom!  Students: I'm not going to the bathroom!  Teacher: Where are you going?  Students: I'm going to the produce section. Going to Future Making Plans Ask six students to go to the grocery store again. This time assign different steps of the action series to  each one. "But not yet; wait a minute." Ask five to go to the produce section, one to choose some fruit,  another to put it in the cart, the third to choose some vegetables, the fourth to weigh them, and the fifth to  put some back. Then ask the sixth student to go to the dairy section to choose some eggs. Finally have all  six stand in line at the check­out, one to say hello to the cashier and one to pay. Ask a seventh student to  be the cashier who will bag the groceries. Next, ask the students "Who's going to go to the produce section? Who's going to go to the dairy section?  Who's going to choose some eggs, some fruit, some vegetables? Who's going to weigh them? Who's going  to pay for the groceries?" etc. Or, "What is (Selma) going to do?" Continue to discuss this plan for the future, then follow with a dictation of the questions and answers  and pair practice. Finally, to create the real­time context, have the seven students actually go thru  the actions. Past Tense Ask similar questions in the past tense about the actions of these same seven students: "Who chose  some vegetables? Who said hello to the cashier? Who bagged the groceries?" etc. Or, "What did (Ysaac) do?" Again, follow this with a dictation and pair practice.
  • 4. Present Tense Conversation about the students' lives Ask students conversationally how often they go to the grocery store, how often they buy fruit, chicken,  eggs, etc. Also "What kind of fruit do you buy? How much milk? What other groceries do you buy?" etc.
  • 5. Other Grammatical Forms Prepositional phrases Stack various grocery items on top of each other, placing some in front of others, under, on, between, etc.  Then ask "Where is the milk What's between the bananas and the broccoli? etc. Count/Non­count Nouns Ask students how much coffee they have at home, or how many apples they bought yesterday. Have  them ask each other about other food they have at home. If the students are high beginners, ask who has  more/less, or more/fewer, based on their answers to the former questions. Different action series lend themselves to different grammar points, but whatever you have introduced in  one context can be considered for subsequent contexts or series, and most grammar points can be gotten  back to, if not repeated with every single series. Additional Materials Available at Command Performance Language Institute LIVE ACTION ENGLISH by Elizabeth Kuizenga Romijn and Contee Seely LIVE ACTION ENGLISH INTERACTIVE Software for beginners, based on the text Live Action English; TPR on a Computer! And accompanying Workbooks in two levels by Elizabeth Kuizenga Romijn
  • 6. Available at www.cpli.net