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CORE's ten trends for 2010
 

CORE's ten trends for 2010

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CORE publishes its ten trends annually to highlight issues and themes that will impact on the work of educators in early childhood, schools and tertiary institutions in the NZ context.

CORE publishes its ten trends annually to highlight issues and themes that will impact on the work of educators in early childhood, schools and tertiary institutions in the NZ context.

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  • This presentation will provide a ‘birds-eye’ view of ten trends that we’re likely to see impact on our use of ICT in education in NZ through 2010. These trends are posted on the CORE website, and will form the basis of ongoing discussion during the year as we see and experience the impact of them.
  • A teacher/instructor/professor obviously plays numerous roles in a traditional classroom: role model, encourager, supporter, guide, synthesizer. Most importantly, the teacher offers a narrative of coherence of a particular discipline. Selecting a textbook, determining and sequencing lecture topics, and planning learning activities, are all undertaken to offer coherence of a subject area. Instructional (or learning) design is a structured method of coherence provision.
  • Technology - constantly changing, understanding of hardware, software, applications, student use etc Curriculum (content) - inquiry, thinking, competencies, 21st century learning Pedagogy - literacy, assessment, collaboration etc
  • There are now more hand-helds sold world-side every year than desktops, and in New Zealand there are now more mobile phones sold than the size of our population!
  • Mainframes - computers shared by lots of people Personal - individual owned and use Ubiquity - computers fade into the background of our lives - learning anywhere, from any device, at any time

CORE's ten trends for 2010 CORE's ten trends for 2010 Presentation Transcript

  • Derek Wenmoth Director, eLearning CORE Education Ltd
  • The ten trends… …represent
a
view
of
some
key
areas
of interest
for
NZ
educators
with
regards
to
the impact
of
ICTs
on
teaching
and
learning.
  • Overview 1. Changing
role
of
teachers
and
learners 2. Internet
capable,
mobile
devices
for
learning 3. Globalised
learning 4. Ubiquitous
compuGng 5. Cyber
ciGzenship 6. Digital
literacy 7. Open
educaGon
resources 8. Cloud
compuGng 9. Advanced
networks
and
school
‘loops’ 10. Assessment
pracGces
  • Changing role of teachers and learners
  • Changing role of learners Once
they
were… Now
they
are… • Consumers • Creators • Contributors • Communicators • Collaborators • Coordinators In
an
“architecture
of par0cipa0on”
  • Teacher roles in a networked learning environment 1. Amplifying 2. CuraGng 3. Way‐finding
and
socially‐driven sense‐making 4. AggregaGng 5. Filtering 6. Modelling 7. Persistent
presence http://www.connectivism.ca/?p=220
  • Instructional coherence “…teachers’
success
in making
coherent instrucGonal
decisions depends
on
developing
a posiGon
or
stance
on
six dimensions
: 1.knowledge, 2.
professionalism, 3.
collaboraGon, 4.
instrucGon, 5.
agency, 6.
authority, ‐
that
is
focused
on learning
and
the
learner.”
  • Resolving the tensions
  • TPACK TPACK http://www.tpck.org
  • Take-aways • Social
and
technological
networks
subvert
the classroom‐based
role
of
the
teacher
‐
How
can
we achieve
clear
outcomes
through
distributed means? • In
what
ways
do
we
regard
teachers
and
students as
learners
in
a
dynamic
system? • Is
school
reform
possible
without
a
change
in
the role
of
teachers? • What
sort
of
conGnuing
professional
development is
most
effecGve
for

teachers
to
adapt?
  • Internet capable, mobile devices
  • Pockets of Potential More
than
half
of
the
world’s populaGon
now
owns
a
cell phone
and
children
under
12 consGtute
one
of
the
fastest growing
segments
of
mobile technology
users
in
the
U.S. “It
is
no
longer
a
ques0on
of whether
we
should
use
these devices
to
support
learning,
but how
and
when,
to
use
them.” Michael
H.
Levine http://joanganzcooneycenter.org/pdf/pockets_of_potential.pdf
  • More than a phone… • Phone
(obviously) • Appointments
Calendar • Alarm
Clock • Game
device • Music
player • SGll
Camera • Video
Camera • Video
player • Address
Book • To
Do
List
Reminder • Voice
Recorder • Calculator • Email
Tool • Text
Messenger • Satellite
NavigaGon
System
(ref:
GPSXC.)
  • • Gartner prediction that mobiles will overtake PCs as the most common web browsing device within 3 years - http://lisadawley.wordpress.com/2010/01/16/ thoughts-about-mobile-learning/ www.engadget.com/.../gartner-forecasts-phones-overtaking-pcs-as-most-common-web-brows/
  • hkp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_number_of_mobile_phones_in_use
  • What’s allowed? http://www.2020.org.nz/template/ict_09_-_online_final_.pdf
  • What’s used? http://www.2020.org.nz/template/ict_09_-_online_final_.pdf
  • Take aways… • Do
you
know
what
the
ownership
of
mobile technologies
is
by
students
at
your
school? • What
policies
do
you
have
in
place
regarding the
use
of
mobile
technologies
in
your school? • Is
your
school
network
prepared
to accommodate
student‐owned
mobile devices
being
connected?
  • Globalised Learning
  • Connected – Able
to
relate
well
to
others – EffecGve
users
of
communicaGons
tools – Connected
to
the
land
and
environment – Members
of
communiGes – InternaGonal
ciGzens Source:
NZ
Curriculum,
2007
  • World population
  • World population divided
  • Where will this take us? hkp://www.ted.com/talks/hans_rosling_on_global_populaGon_growth.html
  • Global communications Modern technologies have reduced, and in some cases removed the boundaries for learning. We now live in a 'globalised' world of communications, news feeds, interaction etc. where our actions at a local level have implications at a global level.
  • Borderless learning Our education is no longer confined to the school we live in - we can access courses/subjects from almost anywhere and at any time. The world is our classroom! Global connectivity now enables student driven niche learning projects - if schools and teachers allow and enable them to happen.
  • Global awareness Putting learning in a global context involves supporting young people to make sense of their lives by understanding the global interconnections we all have. It helps pupils understand how they are affected by events around the world and to recognise that what they do affects people and the environment in other countries. This learning can help counter a sense of helplessness in the face of ‘global forces’.
  • Climate change and indigenous communities
  • Take-aways • How
are
the
issues
of
being
a
part
of
a
global village
reflected
in
your
school;
in
the
student body,
in
the
programmes
of
learning? • In
what
ways
are
ICTs
being
used
in
your
school
to enable
parGcipaGon
in
the
global
classroom? • Do
you
agree
that
global
learning
can
help
counter the
sense
of
helplessness
in
the
face
of
‘global forces’.
  • Ubiquitous computing
  • Third paradigm Ubiquitous computing Personal computing Mainframes
  • Ubiquity • Learning
anywhere,
at
any
Gme,
from
any device • iPod
touch
trials
‐
wireless
school environments • Home,
school,
community
spaces
as
learning locaGons
  • Take-aways… • How
do
your
programmes
of
learning
enable students
to
conGnue
learning
outside
of
the classroom
and
school
hours? • To
what
extent
are
staff
and
students
able
to
go online
anywhere
in
your
school
environment? • What
expectaGon
do
you,
your
staff,
your
students have
of
being
able
to
connect
to
the
internet
at any
Gme,
from
anywhere,
with
any
device?
  • Cyber-citizeneship
  • What’s it all about? • Digital
CiGzens
will
adapt their
exisGng
knowledge
to face
new
challenges. • Digital
CiGzens
make
their own
decisions
on
how
much risk
they
will
expose themselves
to. • Digital
CiGzens
contribute to
the
safety
of
their
fellow ciGzens. http://blog.netsafe.org.nz/2010/02/22/is-digital-citizenship-just-marketing-spin/
  • What are the issues? • Sharing
personal • FuncGoning
effecGvely
in informaGon a
digital
world – Skills • Online
predators – Knowledge • Inappropriate
content – Integrity • Piracy • Being
discriminaGng • Social
networks • Social
parGcipaGon • Cyber‐bullying • Social
responsibility
  • Educator responses… Ignore
the
problem Press
the
panic bukon An
educaGve approach
  • Educative Responses • eLearning
‐
encourage
and
model appropriate
behaviours • Games
‐
don’t
just
play
then,
build
them • Modeling,
modeling,
modeling • Include
in
assessment
  • Cyber-citizen dispositions: Confident Safe Responsible http://www.netsafe.org.nz
  • Take-aways… • Are
your
school
cyber
safety
policies
based on
ignorance
and
fear,
or
understanding? • How
are
the
pracGces
of
cyber
ciGzens
being modelled
in
your
school? • What
would
be
the
response
of
your
staff
to a
breakdown
in
this
area?
  • Digital Literacy
  • Definition: Digital
literacy
refers specifically
to
the
range
of skills,
knowledge
and competencies
required
to operate
effecGvely
in
a world
immersed
in
digital technologies.
  • 21st Century learners need to… • Develop
proficiency
with
the
tools
of
technology • Build
relaGonships
with
others
to
pose
and
solve
problems collaboraGvely
and
cross‐culturally • Design
and
share
informaGon
for
global
communiGes
to meet
a
variety
of
purposes • Manage,
analyze
and
synthesize
mulGple
streams
of simultaneous
informaGon • Create,
criGque,
analyze,
and
evaluate
mulG‐media
texts • Akend
to
the
ethical
responsibiliGes
required
by
these complex
environments
  • Take-aways… • What
is
your
personal
vision
for
being literate
in
the
21st
Century? • What
is
your
school’s
vision
for
developing 21st
Century
literacy? • How
is
this
catered
for? • How
is
it
modelled?
  • Open Education Resources
  • General Principals - OER • free, or very nearly free, • easy to use, get and pass around, • editable so teachers can customize content, • cross-platform compatible, • printable, • and accessible so it works with adaptive technology.
  • Creative commons
  • Wiki educator http://www.wikieducator.org
  • Take-aways… • What
use
do
your
and
your
staff
currently make
of
open
educaGon
resources • Do
you
have
policies
and
pracGces
in
place regarding
the
use
of
resources
obtained online? • Do
you
have
policies
and
pracGce
in
place regarding
the
development
and
sharing
of student
and
teacher
created
resources?
  • Cloud Computing
  • What is cloud computing?
  • What is cloud computing?
  • Cloud computing hkp://blog.core‐ed.net/derek/2009/06/8‐ways‐cloud‐ compuGng‐may‐change‐schools.html
  • Benefits to schools Backup and Automatic failover software Reduced updates capital outlay Ubiquitous Reduced access support costs Expert Addresses support Collaboration licensing potential issues
  • Take aways • How
would
you
describe
the
concept
of
the cloud
to
your
staff
or
board
of
trustees? • What
do
you
understand
to
be
the advantages
and
risks
of
storing
school
data in
the
cloud? • What
services
currently
owned
and managed
by
your
school
would
most
easily be
provided
in
the
cloud?
  • Advanced Networks & School loops
  • What makes an AN different? • An
Advanced
Network
offers
significantly
greater access
speed: – Dial
up
connecGon
‐
around
50kbit/sec
(50,000
bits
per second) – 'High
Speed'
internet
‐
typically
2.5Mbit/sec
(2.5
million bits
per
second) – Advanced
Network
‐
from
1Gigabit/sec
(1000
million bits
per
second)
forecast
to
rise
to
around
40Gbit/sec within
the
next
few
years.
  • The World Scene
  • KAREN http://www.karen.net.nz/topology/
  • Speed comparison Speed Capacity
  • A School’s “Loop” Internet School A School KAREN School A School Aggregation University Point Services Public Library School A School
  • National Education Network http://www.karen.net.nz/topology/
  • NEN Trial hkp://www.core‐ed.net/karen
  • Take-aways… • Do
you
know
how
much
your
current
ICT systems
actually
cost
(including
staff
Gme for
support
and
maintenance
etc?) • Are
you
acGvely
seeking
to
work
with local/regional
councils
and
business
groups to
find
soluGons
in
your
area? • Who
in
your
school/community
is
charged with
understanding
and
leading
this?
  • Assessment Practices
  • Purpose of assessment 

“The
primary
purpose
of
school‐based assessment
is
to
improve
student’s learning
and
the
quality
of
learning programmes.” The
New
Zealand
Curriculum
Framework,
page
26
  • Key Principles • Purpose
should
always
be
explicit • Best
interests
and
progress
of
students
paramount • Should
be
an
integral
part
of
the
learning
process • InformaGon
should
be
shared
with
the
student
at
the
Gme of
the
event
–
or
shortly
aterwards • Form
of
assessment
should
be
appropriate
for
the knowledge,
skills,
autudes
to
be
assessed • Takes
into
account
learning
styles
and
cultural
expectaGons
  • Two key issues 1. How
to
cater
for
a
personalised
approach to
learning
and
assessment,
including diagnosGc,
formaGve
and
summaGve pracGces 2. How
to
record
assessment
data
and evidence
in
an
ongoing
manner.
  • Role of ICTs in assessment • Large‐scale,
generaGve
standardised tests
‐
eg
e‐asTTtle • Next‐step
suggesGons
‐
eg
MathleGcs • Tracking
contribuGons
‐
eg
wikis • Customisable‐
eg
online
quizzes
and surveys • Personalising
assessment
‐ eg
e‐porvolios
  • Take-aways • What
are
the
range
of
diagnosGc,
formaGve and
summaGve
assessment
pracGces
you currently
use
in

your
school? • Which
of
these
could
be
or
are
enabled
by the
smart
use
of
ICTs? • How
are
you
using
data
to
support
reporGng of
student
progress
against
naGonal benchmarks?
  • Thank you To
conGnue
this
discussion
go
to: hkp://www.core‐ed.org/lab/ten_trends Email
me:
derek@core‐ed.net Blog:
hkp://blog.core‐ed.net/derek Images
used
in
the
presentaGon
from hkp://www.freefoto.com
(CC
License)