AP Government
Political Parties
Party Functions
Political Party
An organization that seeks political power by electing people to
office so that its positi...
The Nomination of Candidates
Closed Primary System
Only registered members of the
party are allowed to vote in the
primary...
Party Systems
Multiparty
 Coalition government is
necessary
 Minor parties have an
incentive to persevere
 Proportional...
Minor Parties:
Persistence and Frustration
Ideological Parties:
Focused on a core set
of beliefs (Libertarian
Party)
Prote...
Minor Parties in the United States
Realigning Elections
1. Jacksonian Democrats and Whigs 1824 to 1850
2. Abraham Lincoln (1860): Post-Civil War
Republican D...
Realigning Elections
Roosevelt’s optimism and “can do” attitude in the
face of the Great Depression helped cement the New
...
Divided Government
Currently: Since 1953, divided government, with one
party controlling Congress and the other the White
...
The 2000, 2002, 2004, 2006, and 2008 Elections:
Into the New Century
 2000: 50-50 partisan tie in the Senate, slim Republ...
Party Identification
Party Identification
Using this data, characterize today’s electorate.
Results: Partisan Realignment and
Dealignment
 Voters have shown no consistent preference for one
party over the other
 ...
Party Identification
How Parties Raise and Spend Money
 Revenue
◦ Soft money
◦ Hard money
 Expenditures
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Political Parties

592 views
462 views

Published on

Published in: News & Politics
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
592
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
15
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
18
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Political Parties

  1. 1. AP Government Political Parties
  2. 2. Party Functions Political Party An organization that seeks political power by electing people to office so that its positions and philosophy become public policy Unify the Electorate Help Organize Government Translate Preferences into Policy Provide Loyal Opposition Organize the Competition
  3. 3. The Nomination of Candidates Closed Primary System Only registered members of the party are allowed to vote in the primary Open Primary System Voters are allowed to participate in the primary election without declaring membership in a party Party Convention A National meeting of party delegates to vote on matters of policy and in some cases to select party candidates for public office Caucus A meeting of party delegates to vote on matters of policy and in some cases to select party candidates for public office These two are the most popular today
  4. 4. Party Systems Multiparty  Coalition government is necessary  Minor parties have an incentive to persevere  Proportional representation  Governments tend toward instability Two party • Winner-takes-all system • “Wasted vote” syndrome discourages minor parties • Government tends toward stability • Policy change is incremental Which system is better?
  5. 5. Minor Parties: Persistence and Frustration Ideological Parties: Focused on a core set of beliefs (Libertarian Party) Protest Parties: Spring up in response to a situation/law passed (Reform Party) Single-Issue Parties: Focus on one idea (Prohibition Party) Splinter Parties: Break away from the larger party (Tea Party) What role do they play in our system? Is this a wasted vote?
  6. 6. Minor Parties in the United States
  7. 7. Realigning Elections 1. Jacksonian Democrats and Whigs 1824 to 1850 2. Abraham Lincoln (1860): Post-Civil War Republican Dominance (until 1896)
  8. 8. Realigning Elections Roosevelt’s optimism and “can do” attitude in the face of the Great Depression helped cement the New Deal Democratic coalition that won him the presidency 3. The New Deal Democratic Party (1932 to 1968)
  9. 9. Divided Government Currently: Since 1953, divided government, with one party controlling Congress and the other the White House, has been in effect twice as long as one-party control of both the legislative and executive branches
  10. 10. The 2000, 2002, 2004, 2006, and 2008 Elections: Into the New Century  2000: 50-50 partisan tie in the Senate, slim Republican majority in House and contested presidential vote count  2002: President’s party gained seats in the House and Senate  2004: Bush reelected and his party picked up seats in Senate and House  2006: Democrats win majority in both House and Senate  2008: Democrats increase majority in House and Senate, and win the presidency  2013: Democrats control the presidency and the Senate (barely); Republicans control the House
  11. 11. Party Identification
  12. 12. Party Identification Using this data, characterize today’s electorate.
  13. 13. Results: Partisan Realignment and Dealignment  Voters have shown no consistent preference for one party over the other  Dealignment: Weakening of partisan preferences that points to a rejection of both major parties and a rise in the number of independents.  Still, two-thirds of all “independents” are really partisans in their voting behavior/attitudes ◦ One-third consistently Democratic, one-third consistently lean Republican, and one-third are independents
  14. 14. Party Identification
  15. 15. How Parties Raise and Spend Money  Revenue ◦ Soft money ◦ Hard money  Expenditures

×