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Good application final-nopics
Good application final-nopics
Good application final-nopics
Good application final-nopics
Good application final-nopics
Good application final-nopics
Good application final-nopics
Good application final-nopics
Good application final-nopics
Good application final-nopics
Good application final-nopics
Good application final-nopics
Good application final-nopics
Good application final-nopics
Good application final-nopics
Good application final-nopics
Good application final-nopics
Good application final-nopics
Good application final-nopics
Good application final-nopics
Good application final-nopics
Good application final-nopics
Good application final-nopics
Good application final-nopics
Good application final-nopics
Good application final-nopics
Good application final-nopics
Good application final-nopics
Good application final-nopics
Good application final-nopics
Good application final-nopics
Good application final-nopics
Good application final-nopics
Good application final-nopics
Good application final-nopics
Good application final-nopics
Good application final-nopics
Good application final-nopics
Good application final-nopics
Good application final-nopics
Good application final-nopics
Good application final-nopics
Good application final-nopics
Good application final-nopics
Good application final-nopics
Good application final-nopics
Good application final-nopics
Good application final-nopics
Good application final-nopics
Good application final-nopics
Good application final-nopics
Good application final-nopics
Good application final-nopics
Good application final-nopics
Good application final-nopics
Good application final-nopics
Good application final-nopics
Good application final-nopics
Good application final-nopics
Good application final-nopics
Good application final-nopics
Good application final-nopics
Good application final-nopics
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Good application final-nopics

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http://www.eclipsecon.org/sessions/what-makes-application-good-application

http://www.eclipsecon.org/sessions/what-makes-application-good-application

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  • The extent to which a product can be used by specified users to achieve specified goals with effectiveness, efficiency, and satisfaction in a specified context of use This definition is from the International Organization for Standardization, which talks about Ergonomics, and software ergonomics in particular This might be very abstract, so we are going to pick out some words here to explain this a bit 07.11.11
  • The Highlighted words are going to guide us through this presentation. We will Start by looking at the Product, User (and his Goals), and the Context of Use 07.11.11
  • In case of software, the model also has input, output (storage), and throughput 07.11.11
  • In case of software, the model also has input, output (storage), and throughput 07.11.11
  • In case of software, the model also has input, output (storage), and throughput 07.11.11
  • Most fo the times, when developing software, there is a vague idea of what the software is supposed to do throughput weg, user 07.11.11
  • entwickler, buchhalter, sachbearbeiterin, fabrikarbeiter, astronaut, oma, hund What do you want to know about the user? 07.11.11
  • büro, investmentbank, mobile desktop, smartphone 07.11.11
  • Auto als bispiel 07.11.11
  • Farben umändern 07.11.11
  • standard form 07.11.11
  • two column layouts 07.11.11
  • example 07.11.11
  • label right aligned 07.11.11
  • colon moved 07.11.11
  • colon removed 07.11.11
  • und JA 2 Forms sind identisch....  (das ist der punkt) 07.11.11
  • mandatory auf der nächsten folie 07.11.11
  • mandatory, not dynamic 07.11.11
  • Wrong umbenenen 07.11.11
  • mandatory better 07.11.11
  • error marker, noch mehr felder als error markieren 07.11.11
  • error marker, noch mehr felder als error markieren 07.11.11
  • error marker, noch mehr felder als error markieren 07.11.11
  • disabled 07.11.11
  • noch eine version machen mit disabled label 07.11.11
  • Transcript

    • 1. What makes an application a “good” application ? How is software experienced by end-users ? Derk Smit / Christian Campo EclipseCon Europe 2011
    • 2. <ul><li>Derk Smit </li></ul><ul><li>Christian Campo </li></ul><ul><li>How is software experienced by end-users ? </li></ul><ul><li>What is Usability ? </li></ul><ul><li>Flow ? </li></ul><ul><li>“ Gestalt ” Laws ? </li></ul>Who are we ?
    • 3. Software Quality
    • 4. <ul><li>Definition of Usability </li></ul><ul><li>&amp;quot;The extent to which a product can be used by specified users to achieve specified goals with effectiveness, efficiency, and satisfaction in a specified context of use.&amp;quot; </li></ul><ul><li>Source: ISO 9241-11 </li></ul>Usability, a definition
    • 5. <ul><li>Definition of Usability </li></ul><ul><li>&amp;quot;The extent to which a product can be used by specified users to achieve specified goals with effectiveness , efficiency , and satisfaction in a specified context of use .&amp;quot; </li></ul><ul><li>Source: ISO 9241-11 </li></ul>Usability
    • 6. <ul><li>Product, User, Goal, and Context of Use </li></ul><ul><li>&amp;quot;The extent to which a product can be used by specified users to achieve specified goals … …in a specified context of use .&amp;quot; </li></ul>Usability Source: Productergonomie, H. Dirken I have Goals Context of Use
    • 7. Usability: the user Source: Productergonomie, H. Dirken User PRODUCT <ul><li>Input </li></ul><ul><li>Sight, Hearing, Taste, Smell, Touch, Balance &amp; Acceleration, Temperature </li></ul><ul><li>Output </li></ul><ul><li>Motor skills, Speech </li></ul><ul><li>Throughput </li></ul><ul><li>Decision (processing), Memory (storing) </li></ul>Context of Use Input Output Input Output
    • 8. Usability: the product <ul><li>Input </li></ul><ul><li>Keyboard/Keypad, Mouse, Joystick, Microphone, Touch Screen </li></ul><ul><li>Output </li></ul><ul><li>Monitor, Internal speak, Vibration </li></ul>Source: Productergonomie, H. Dirken Product <ul><li>Throughput </li></ul><ul><li>Decision (processing), Memory (storing) </li></ul>USER Context of Use Input Output Input Output
    • 9. Usability: context of use Context of Use <ul><li>Context of Use </li></ul><ul><li>Use environment (Environmental-, Social- Technological context </li></ul><ul><li>E.g. Temperature, Noise, Pressure, Lighting Conditions, Other products (e.g. safety glasses, gloves), Social Context </li></ul>Source: Productergonomie, H. Dirken USER PRODUCT Context of Use Input Output Input Output
    • 10. Usability: interaction Operation/Manipulation Interaction Source: Productergonomie, H. Dirken Information Context of Use
    • 11. <ul><li>&amp;quot;The extent to which a product can be used by specified users to achieve specified goals with effectiveness, efficiency, and satisfaction in a specified context of use.&amp;quot; </li></ul>Usability Source: Productergonomie, H. Dirken I have Goals Context of Use
    • 12. <ul><li>Product, User, Goal, and Context of Use </li></ul><ul><li>&amp;quot;The extent to which a product can be used by specified users to achieve specified goals … …in a specified context of use .&amp;quot; </li></ul>Design decisions ? Product ? Source: Productergonomie, H. Dirken USER Context of Use Input Output Input Output
    • 13. Design decisions: the user <ul><li>Required domain knowledge knowledge (what does the user need to know to accomplish their job?) </li></ul><ul><li>User </li></ul><ul><li>What goals does the user have? </li></ul><ul><li>Vocabulary of the domain </li></ul><ul><li>How existing products are used </li></ul><ul><li>Abilities and impairments? </li></ul><ul><li>How do the goals of my software relate to other goals of the user’s job? </li></ul><ul><li>Experience level? </li></ul>
    • 14. <ul><li>Context of Use </li></ul><ul><li>What are characteristics of the context (e.g. heat, noise) </li></ul><ul><li>Artifacts in the context </li></ul>Design decision: context of use <ul><li>Context of how the product fits into their lives/workflow </li></ul>Factory floor Public space Library Crowded office space
    • 15. <ul><li>To make a more usable design, you need to know: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Who are your users ? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What are their skills ? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What are their goals ? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>In which context is your product used ? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>The information on user, context, goals will help you make realistic design decisions </li></ul><ul><li>How to get this information ? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>USABILITY RESEARCH &amp; TESTING! </li></ul></ul>What does this all mean ?
    • 16. <ul><li>Definition of Usability </li></ul><ul><li>&amp;quot;The extent to which a product can be used by specified users to achieve specified goals with effectiveness , efficiency , and satisfaction in a specified context of use .&amp;quot; </li></ul><ul><li>Source: ISO 9241-11 </li></ul>Usability
    • 17. Usability: effectiveness <ul><ul><li>Measuring Effectiveness </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Percentage of task completed </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Ratio of success to failure </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Number of features or commands used </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Effectiveness </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Definition: Successful in producing an intended result </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Source: http://www.usabilitymetrics.com/usability-metrics.html </li></ul></ul>Sports car Bicycle
    • 18. <ul><li>Efficiency </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Definition: Achieving maximum productivity with minimum wasted effort or expense </li></ul></ul>Usability: efficiency <ul><ul><li>Measuring Efficiency </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Time to complete the task </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Time to learn </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Time spent on error </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Percentage or number of errors </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Source: http://www.usabilitymetrics.com/usability-metrics.html </li></ul></ul>Sports car 1-Liter car
    • 19. <ul><li>Satisfaction </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Definition: Fulfillment in one’s expectations, needs, or pleasure derived from this </li></ul></ul>Usability: satisfaction <ul><ul><li>Measuring Satisfaction </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Rating scale for satisfaction with functions and features </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Rating scale for usefulness of the product or service </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Number of times user expresses frustration or anger </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Source: http://www.usabilitymetrics.com/usability-metrics.html </li></ul></ul>
    • 20. <ul><li>Satisfaction </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Fulfillment in one’s expectations, needs, or pleasure derived from this </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Keep users happy by allowing for flow </li></ul>Usability: satisfaction Experience
    • 21. <ul><li>Flow is the mental state of operation in which a person in an activity is fully immersed in a feeling of energized focus, full involvement, and success in the process of the activity </li></ul><ul><li>How to allow for flow ? (Some principles) </li></ul><ul><li>The user must have a clear goal </li></ul><ul><li>Task should be doable/workable </li></ul><ul><li>(Inter)actions should have immediate feedback </li></ul><ul><li>In Software ? (Some principles) </li></ul><ul><li>Direct, don’t discuss </li></ul><ul><li>Keep tools close at hand </li></ul><ul><li>Provide modeless feedback </li></ul>What is flow ? Experience Sources: About Face 2.0, Cooper, Reiman, The Psychology of Optimal Experience; Csikszentmihalyi
    • 22. Flow ?
    • 23. Allowing for flow search
    • 24. Allowing for flow search
    • 25. Allowing for flow search
    • 26. Allowing for flow search
    • 27. Allowing for flow search
    • 28. Allowing for flow save
    • 29. Allowing for flow save
    • 30. Allowing for flow save Demo textedit
    • 31. Allowing for flow
    • 32. Allowing for flow
    • 33. Allowing for flow
    • 34. Allowing for flow
    • 35. <ul><li>Flow != Workflow </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Flow links Workflows </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Flow allows uninterrupted Work </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Think ahead for your user ??? </li></ul></ul>Allowing for flow
    • 36. <ul><li>Efficiency </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Achieving maximum productivity with minimum wasted effort or expense </li></ul></ul><ul><li>To make a product more efficient one can reduce TIME and WORK </li></ul>Usability: efficiency Source: About Face 2.0, Cooper, Reimann
    • 37. Reducing perceptual work ? <ul><li>(Some) Dimensions of visual coding </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Position </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Color </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Texture </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Form </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Size </li></ul></ul>Source: Productergonomie, H. Dirken Traffic light
    • 38. Reducing perceptual work ? <ul><li>Proximity </li></ul><ul><li>Elements that are close together tend to be perceived as a group (belonging together) </li></ul><ul><li>Similarity </li></ul><ul><li>Elements with similar properties (e.g. shape, color) tend to be perceived as groups </li></ul>
    • 39. Reducing perceptual work
    • 40. Reducing perceptual work
    • 41. Reducing perceptual work
    • 42. Reducing perceptual work
    • 43. Reducing perceptual work
    • 44. Reducing perceptual work
    • 45. Reducing perceptual work Label Textfield 10 px next Label 30 px Label always at the beginning of a new line 1. 2.
    • 46. Reducing perceptual work I meant in an intelligent way :-)
    • 47. Reducing perceptual work
    • 48. Reducing perceptual work
    • 49. Reducing perceptual work YES ! this is the same as the one above 
    • 50. Reducing perceptual work
    • 51. Reducing perceptual work <ul><li>mandatory </li></ul><ul><li>static </li></ul><ul><li>easy to overlook </li></ul>
    • 52. Reducing perceptual work no longer mandatory
    • 53. Reducing perceptual work
    • 54. Reducing perceptual work <ul><li>errormarker </li></ul>
    • 55. Reducing perceptual work X Invalid character in birthday. X
    • 56. Reducing perceptual work X Invalid character in birthday. X X
    • 57. Reducing perceptual work X Invalid format for taxnumber, no `-`allowed. X X
    • 58. Reducing perceptual work ambiguous meaning of disabled
    • 59. Reducing perceptual work better ? what about the label ?
    • 60. Reducing perceptual work
    • 61. <ul><li>Definition of Usability </li></ul><ul><li>&amp;quot;The extent to which a product can be used by specified users to achieve specified goals with effectiveness , efficiency , and satisfaction in a specified context of use .” </li></ul>Recap Source: ISO 9241-11 Flow “ Gestalt” Laws Mind this Do not interrupt this
    • 62. The question is ? What is the context of use ? Who are my users ? What are their goals ? How can I make their work more efficient ? How can I make their work more satisfying ? How can I make their work effective ? How do users experience YOUR software ?
    • 63. <ul><li>About Face 2.0 : The Essentials of Interaction Design; Cooper, Alan; Reihmann, Robert </li></ul><ul><li>Flow : The Psychology of Optimal Experience; Csikszentmihalyi, Mihaly </li></ul><ul><li> http://www.usabilitymetrics.com/ </li></ul><ul><li>Productergonomie; Dirken, Hans </li></ul><ul><li>ISO 9241-11 </li></ul>References

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