Job interview tips
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Job interview tips Job interview tips Document Transcript

  • This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication [communication] reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. Job Interview Tips- Students’ Point of View 1. Learn how to talk about your negative sides in a way so others would take them as your advantages. For example: “I don’t know how to operate that machine but I learn quickly and I know I wouldn’t have any problems because I always adapt easily.” 2. Talk about things that make you unique - everyone says that they are ambitious and hard- working, say something about your additional original skills that would attract your employer’s attention. 3. Learn how to use language of benefits. Your potential employer does not care about what you are like,they are only interested in benefits which they can gain thanks to hiring you. Instead of just stating, “I’m energetic”,say, “I’m energetic so you would have less work to do because I’d do it for you. In that way you’d save some time.” Job Interview Tips- Expert’s Point of View 1. It is highly recommended to get prepared for the interview before you attend it: a. Research your potential employer in advance,get familiar with the company’s profile and background so that you cangather as much information about the company as possible; Attempt to become their customer for a moment: - if it is a summer holiday job in a restaurant, find out about its history, idea, menu, come and visit the place, talk to its current employees, feel its ambience; - if it is a hotel- learn about its character and purpose, whether it is mainly a business hotel serving as accommodation for manager staff or maybe an eventful one where lots of organised parties, meetings, conferences are held, or maybe of a guest house type where families mostly stay- a job in any of the mentioned type will look different; - if the range of your employer’s activity comes down to merchandising or production one, get familiar with their offer; find out what they do in particular, who their most noteworthy customers are, what the extent of this activity is (you may expect to hear the following questions: What do you know about our business? What made you apply for the job inour company?) b. Make notes or, even more advisably, remember your potential employer’s achievements, e.g. any Grand Prix Awards in their business activity category or a high rankingposition among similar businesses. This aspect will turn out beneficial or may even play as an ace up in your sleeve as employers appreciate noticing their effort made in the company development, regardless of business’scharacter- whether it is a restaurant, hotel, clothes company or a going grocery concern.
  • This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication [communication] reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. c. Think through what you expect from a given position you are applying for; it is almost certain you will be asked about your expectations towards this particular post. Think ahead, do not ponder over it during the interview. Thanks to it, you will make an impressionof an actual candidate, adequately prepared and self-assured while your employer will not take you aback when asking this question. d. You are certainly going to be asked about your availability. Think it out before, as employers prefer to hear a definite answer rather than “I’ll adapt myself”. e. Think of your wages. This question is more than certain to be asked anda difficult one for both a candidate and employer. Respond accordingly to your real needs and your employer’s real possibilities. f. Before leaving for the interview, plan your route. Make sure you know the exact location of your interview and how much time it takesto reach the placeso that you can avoid potential getting lost,traffic jams, road works or delays. It is better to come earlier, even 10-15 minutes earlier, than get the place at the very last minute. You will make a better impression but also calm down your nerves and look around in the place. You will unquestionably find something, which will help you in the interview ahead. If you cannot make it to be on time for reasons beyond your control, let the company or the person, you made an appointment with, know about it. When calling and explaining the situation invoking the reasons beyond your control, ensure that you care a lot and ask if it is possible to set a new date of the interview. Even if it is not possible, thank for the chance of the previous appointment. g. If you decide not to attend the job interview, let the company or the person, you made an appointment with, know about your decision (call or at least text them). Definitely, express your gratitude for the invitation to the interview. You are not obliged to justify your resignation unless you want or the reason is sensible like being attracted by another job offer, which you are going to accept or leaving abroad. h. Before you come in for the interview, collect your thoughts. Revise your interview answers so you feel confident and think of a successful situation that has recently made you pleased or proud of yourself.
  • This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication [communication] reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 2. During the job interview: a. Be prepared for a brief presentation of yourself. This is usually an interview opener, which offers an opportunity to describe yourself positively and focus the interview on your strengths. Introduce yourself, talk about what you do professionally and discuss hobbies or pursuits that interest you, such as sports, clubs, cultural activities, and favourite things to read. Avoid dwelling on any political or religious beliefs that may create conflict with those of the interviewer, and mentioning extreme sport you are keen on. b. The key to successful interviewing is to match your qualifications to what the interviewer is looking for- let it be what the employer needs along with your own expectations and honesty. Be yourself as dishonesty gets discovered and is grounds for withdrawing job offers and for firing. c. Share your thoughts how to introduce new ideas or implement new methods for developing the company. d. Speak the language of benefits- describe two or three skills you have, which are relevant to the job, and which could be put to use in the position you are being considered for so that the company will benefit; avoid clichés (e.g. “I am organized and meticulous”) and invoke specific evidence. e. Respond thoroughly, while being concise in your wording.When pointing out actions worth taking in your view in the given company, support them with your own experience in that trade or at least reflections on a given matter. f. Remember about your body language. Sit up straight and lean slightly forward in your chair. Do not keep your arms folded across your chest, as you will appear unfriendly and disengaged. You can gesticulate gently, which will make you more credible. g. Smile softly and maintain an eye contact with an interviewer around 60-70% of the time. h. Keep in mind the fact that what may seem a weakness from one point of view, may be a strengthfrom another perspective.You will need different qualities when working analytically with numbers, regulations or when dealing with commissions in an advertising agency. i. Make a list of the qualities they are looking for that also describe you. They just want to know if you are a good match for the job. When asked about your weakness, give an honest answer (but not a long one), be confident in the fact that this weakness does not make you any less of a great candidate, and show that you are working on this weakness and tell the recruiter how.
  • This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication [communication] reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. j. Talking about your success, give an example of real and measurable success. It does not have to be that spectacular but your involvement is of huge importance. k. Discussing a failure or mistake, show it in the light of a lesson,experience, which you learned from, and evidence that you can take responsibility for your mistakes. You may add that you think you have learned something valuable from every mistake you have made. Then have a brief story ready with a specific illustration. l. Use positive language- instead of admitting, “I don’t get angry easily”, say, “generally I am a calm person”. The word “problem” could be replaced with “difficulty, challenge, stalemate.” Thus, you will build your positive appearance of a person resistant to stress. m. Even when your interviewer gives you a first and last name, address them by title (Ms., Mr., Dr.) and last name, until invited to do otherwise. 3. Checklist: a. Have a copy of the job description and the person specification on you and a couple of copies of your CV, all in a neat folder or portfolio case. Read through them again before you head in. b. Think of questions to ask your interviewer. Participating actively during the interview gives a good impression of your level of interest in the job. You may ask questions that reflect your interest in future prospects or ones concerningmatters discussed during the interview itself. Your questions should invoke facts (e.g. „How many employees are working in your headquarters? Are you striving to get the President’s Award for…..again?), not assumptions (e.g. What is your financial condition? How much can I earn here?) c. Send a thank-you letter to your interviewer promptly, where you may also restate your readiness to take the job. Even if it is just a formality, you may improve your chances of obtaining the job and make it a preponderant factor, especially when a narrow circle of candidates with similar qualifications apply for the position and the employer finds it difficult to make a final decision.