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Dadaism-cubism comparison

Dadaism-cubism comparison

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Dadaism-cubism comparison

  1. 1. Dadaism and Cubism – comparison Olga Jakubanis Wiktoria Wrzyszcz
  2. 2. Roots and beginning Dadaism:  New York, c. 1915  Zürich, c. 1916  Roots in pre-war avant-garde  Said to coalesce at the Cabaret Voltaire Cubism:  France (no exact city), between 1907 and 1911  Roots in proto-Cubist painting Les Demoiselles d'Avignon by Picasso
  3. 3. Name origins  Cubism – derived from latin word Cubus, meaning a cube. Had a relevance to geometrisation, which was main feature of this art movement  Dadaism – there are different theories about name origins, the most common is that artist Richard Huelsenbeck plunged a knife at random into a dictionary, where it landed on dada, a colloquial French term for a hobby horse
  4. 4. Features and aims – Dadaism  more of attitude and lifestyle than art movement  negation of recognized values, and thus opposition to war and lofty ideas, in the name of which millions of people died  they denied traditional means of expression in art and traditional genres  prefered gestures over artwork  represented the opposite of everything which art stood for (ignored aesthetics, intended to offend)
  5. 5. For us, art is not an end in itself ... but it is an opportunity for the true perception and criticism of the times we live in ~ Hugo Ball Left : Marcel Duchamp, Fountain, 1917
  6. 6. We had lost confidence in our culture. Everything had to be demolished. We would begin again after the tabula rasa ~ Marcel Janco Left: Marcel Duchamp, L.H.O.O.Q, 1919
  7. 7. We do not recognize any theory. We already have cubist and futuristic academies: laboratories of formal ideas ~ Tristan Tzara Left: Raoul Hausmann, The Art Critic,1919–20
  8. 8. Everything that the artist spits out is an art ~Kurt Schwitters Left : Hannah Höch, Cut with the Dada Kitchen Knife through the Last Weimar Beer-Belly Cultural Epoch in Germany, 1919
  9. 9. Features and aims – Cubism  artistic achievements of previous generations were completely rejected  reality being understood through geometry  artwork is broken into a series of separate planes, seen in different lighting, which are then presented side by side on canvas  divided into proto-Cubism, Analitic Cubism, Hermetic Cubism and Synthetic Cubism
  10. 10.  Proto-Cubism - withdrawal from natural body form, still nature and solids appear in paintings, inspiration in african and hispanic art Right: Pablo Picasso, Gertrude Stein, 1906
  11. 11.  Analitic Cubism – delicate compositions in shade of brown and grey, art was supposed to influence viewer's intelect and imagination Right: Pablo Picasso, Portrait of Ambrose Vollard, 1910
  12. 12.  Hermetic Cubism - significant deformation of objects, use of newspapers, tickets, fragments of wallpapers, etc. Right: Pablo Picasso, Bottle of Vieux Marc, Glass, Guitar and Newspaper, 1913
  13. 13.  Synthetic Cubism – use of collage, less deformation, more vivid colors, everyday objects as aesthetics Right: Pablo Picasso, The Guitar, 1913
  14. 14. Dadaism and Cubism – artworks other than paintings Dadaism:  Photomontage  Readymades  Music  Poetry  Assemblage Cubism:  Architecture  Sculpture  Literature  Poetry
  15. 15. Dadaism - Photomontage  Photomontage utilized actual or reproductions of real photographs printed in the press  Max Ernst used images from the First World War to illustrate messages of the destruction of war Top: Max Ernst, Murdering Airplane, 1920
  16. 16. Dadaism – Readymades  Marcel Duchamp viewed everyday objects as objects of art, calling them readymades Left: Marcel Duchamp, Readymade Hat Rack, 1917
  17. 17. Dadaism – Music and videos  Contemporary band Franz Ferdinand's music videos are inspired by Dadaism, especially art of Max Ernst, for example Une semaine de bonté, a comic book
  18. 18. Dadaism – Poetry  Sound poetry was a development of Dadaists, primarily for performance. The form bridged literal and musical composition Left: Bonset sound-poem, Passing troop, 1916
  19. 19. Dadaism – Assemablage  The assembly of everyday objects to produce meaningful or meaningless (relative to the war) pieces of work including war objects and trash Left: Raoul Hausmann, Mechanischer Kopf (Der Geist unserer Zeit), 1920
  20. 20. Cubism - Architecture  Link between early- 20th-century art and architecture. As style, didn't refer to the past and centered on the dissolution and reconstitution of three-dimensional formTop: House of the Black Madonna in Prague, built by Josef Gočár in 1912
  21. 21. Cubism – Sculpture  Sculpture developed in parallel to Cubist painting, seen as the starting point for the entire constructive tendency in 20th- century modernist sculpture Right: Pablo Picasso, Head of a Woman, 1909-1910
  22. 22. Cubism – Literature  Works of Picasso influenced Gertrude Stein and her novels, such as The Making of Americans, in which repetition and repetitive phrases are building blocks Right: Gertrude Stein's poem
  23. 23. Cubism – Poetry  Conscious, deliberate dissociation and recombination of elements into a new artistic entity made self-sufficient by its rigorous architecture ~Kenneth Rexroth Right: Max Weber, The Eye Moment, 1914
  24. 24. Dadaism – Most important creators  Hugo Ball (1886–1927), Germany, Switzerland  Kurt Schwitters (1887–1948), Germany  Tristan Tzara (1896–1963), Romania, France  Max Ernst (1891–1976), Germany, USA  Marcel Duchamp (1887–1968), France  George Grosz (1893–1959), Germany, France, USA  Raoul Hausmann (1886–1971), Germany
  25. 25. Cubism – Most important creators  Fernand Léger (1881-1955), France  Francis Picabia (1879-1953), France  Louis Marcoussis (1878-1941), Poland/ France  Jean Metzinger (1883-1956), France  Pablo Picasso (1881-1973), Spain  Georges Braque (1882-1963), France
  26. 26. Bibliography • www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/cube/hd_cube.htm • http://www.magazynsztuki.pl/kubizm/ • https://pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kubizm • http://www.tate.org.uk/art/art-terms/c/cubism • http://www.theartstory.org/movement-dada.htm • https://www.moma.org/learn/moma_learning/themes/dada • https://www.dadart.com/dadaism/dada/020-history-dada- movement.html • http://www.artyfactory.com/art_appreciation/art_movement s/dadaism.htm • https://artlandapp.com/what-is-dadaism/ • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dada • Google Grafika
  27. 27. Thank you for attention

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