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G R O W I N G I N P L A C E : S U S T A I N A B L E U R B A N
D E S I G N F O R C H I L D R E N & F A M I L I E S
M A R C ...
Community Design – Impacts on Children
 Fewer children walk or bike to school
 Unintended consequences
 Solutions
 Bes...
• In 1969 48% of students walked
or biked to school. (Nationwide
Personal Transportation Survey.)
• In 2001 less than 15% ...
School siting issues: A generation ago
 Small schools
 Located in community centers
(EPA, 2003)
School siting issues: Today
 Mega-schools
 Built on edges of towns and cities
Dorman High School, Roebuck, SC, photo pro...
Parents driving
children to school:
20%-25% of
morning traffic
(NHTSA 2003; Dept. of
Environment)
Unintended Consequences:...
It’s not just distance
Students who live
within 1 mile and
walk or bike:
2001: 63%
1969: 87%
(CDC, 2005)
Destin Elementary...
Most common barriers to walking and biking to
school
 Long distances 62%
 Traffic danger 30%
 Adverse weather 19%
 Fea...
Traffic Danger
If more children walked or
biked to school, it would
reduce the number of
cars near the school at
pick-up a...
Walkable Urbanism
There's demographic evidence; there's consumer
research evidence; but probably the most compelling
evide...
SOLUTION:
MODE SHIFT
Good News!
We Can Fix It
How to Create Mode Shift
Provide people with choices:
 Invest in bicycle/pedestrian infrastructure
 Calm traffic
 Creat...
Mode Shift
 Infrastructure
 Appropriate land-use
and design
 Interconnect modes,
land-use, and
infrastructure
 Social ...
TO SUCCEED
YOU HAVE
TO:
•ENGAGE THE
PUBLIC
•CREATE PLANS
WITH VISION
•PLAN FOR
IMPLEMENTATION
•BE CREATIVE WITH
FUNDING OP...
Disconnected Land-Use Peds/Bikes - Afterthought
Not This
Start with Plans
Long Range Transportation
Plan 2025 (LRTP 2025) adopted
in 2004 by Champaign-Urbana
Urbanized Area Transp...
More Community Transportation Plans
Champaign Moving
Forward:
Transportation Master Plan
2008 – Update to
Champaign’s
Comp...
LRTP 2025 Preferred Scenario calls for:
 Express bus service between core and fringe areas of
the community
 An enhanced...
If implemented LRTP 2025 will:
 Create higher population density, less sprawl
 Promote alternative transportation modes
...
HOW Do We Implement the LRTP?
Infill and having choices sounds
good, but how do we get there while
protecting new developm...
miPLAN
Mobility Implementation Plan
miPLAN's Purpose - What mobility options does the
community want, both now and in the ...
Public Engagement: Neighborhood Transopoly®
22
Attribution: Jan Metzger, Center for Neighborhood Technology, 1950-2010
Summary of Public Input:
Strong consistency found for the following
top priority mobility improvements:
 Improved bicycle...
Mobility Enhanced Development Report
Affordability Index Formula
Affordability Index =
Housing Costs + Transportation Cost...
MED Findings:
Transportation costs in core significantly less than
fringe. Average $/month spent on transportation:
Core=...
C-U Encouraging Mode Shift
 Zipcar- car share
program launched 2009
with 6 cars now have 8
cars
 Safe Routes to School
...
RETROFIT STREETS
CONTROL ACCESS
COMPLETE STREETS
ROAD DIETS
SAFE ROUTES TO SCHOOL
Best Practices
Complete
Streets
What are
complete
streets, and
complete
streets
policies?
 Complete streets are designed and
operated to...
Source: National Complete Streets Coalition
Road Diets
What is a Road Diet?
Bridgeport Way, University Place
Washington
 Major road 23,000 VPD
 High speed limits, no sidewalks, high number of
acce...
After Road
Diet:
Transformed into
Complete Street with
bike lanes, sidewalks,
and 8 roundabouts
Flared intersections
accom...
Bike lanes installed to
reduce bike-
automobile conflicts
and crashes
Interconnected
signalized mid-block
crossings optimi...
SRTS programs – part of the solution
 Improve walking and biking conditions
around schools
 Reduce congestion around sch...
Elements of SRTS programs
 Education
 Encouragement
 Enforcement
 Engineering
 Evaluation
Pictures: Cynthia Hoyle, AI...
Education & Encouragement
Bike Rodeos
Light the
Night Bike
Light
Campaign
Traffic Safety
Workshops
Potential Issues
Issues
No Sidewalks on way to school
Unsafe intersection/street to cross
Distances too great
Solutions...
WEBINARS
REPORTS
ORGANIZATIONS
PROGRAMS
Resources
Webinars
Safe Routes to School:
Improves the Built
Environment
SRTS State Network
Project: Final Report
Reports
Report recommends combining strategies
to significantly reduce GHG emissions:
 Local and regional pricing/reg. that
incre...
Organizations
http://www.saferoutespartnership.org/home
http://www.completestreets.org
http://www.ite.org
http://www.plann...
Programs
http://www.walktoschool.org/index.cfm
http://www.saferoutesinfo.org/index.cfm
http://cufitfamilies.blogspot.com
h...
Programs
Interagency Partnership for Sustainable Communities
 1. Provide more transportation choices.
 2. Promote equita...
CUMTDSupportforModeShiftIncludes
 miPLAN
 Expansion of “unlimited access” to transit
 Lead agency for Car-Share program...
Community visibility promoting safety, healthy
lifestyles, sustainability
Coalition building
Increases mode shift
Benef...
It’s About Our Future:
Active Transportation Benefits Everyone
http://www.ccrpc.org/pl
anning/transportation/l
rtp2/index....
Growing An Active Transportation System
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Growing An Active Transportation System

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Transcript of "Growing An Active Transportation System"

  1. 1. G R O W I N G I N P L A C E : S U S T A I N A B L E U R B A N D E S I G N F O R C H I L D R E N & F A M I L I E S M A R C H 5 , 2 0 1 0 R A L E I G H , N C GROWING AN ACTIVE TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM Cynthia Hoyle, AICP Hoyle Consulting Urbana, IL
  2. 2. Community Design – Impacts on Children  Fewer children walk or bike to school  Unintended consequences  Solutions  Best Practices  Retrofitting our Communities
  3. 3. • In 1969 48% of students walked or biked to school. (Nationwide Personal Transportation Survey.) • In 2001 less than 15% of students walked or biked to school. (2001 National Household Travel Survey) • Today 34% of students living w/in 1 mile of school walk or bike compared to 90% in 1969. (Center for Disease Control ) Picture courtesy of Dan Burden http://www.pedbikeimages.org
  4. 4. School siting issues: A generation ago  Small schools  Located in community centers (EPA, 2003)
  5. 5. School siting issues: Today  Mega-schools  Built on edges of towns and cities Dorman High School, Roebuck, SC, photo provided by Mark Fenton.
  6. 6. Parents driving children to school: 20%-25% of morning traffic (NHTSA 2003; Dept. of Environment) Unintended Consequences: Traffic congestion
  7. 7. It’s not just distance Students who live within 1 mile and walk or bike: 2001: 63% 1969: 87% (CDC, 2005) Destin Elementary School, Destin, FL, provided by Dan Burden, available from PBIC Image Library.
  8. 8. Most common barriers to walking and biking to school  Long distances 62%  Traffic danger 30%  Adverse weather 19%  Fear of crime danger 12% Note: Sum of percentages is more than 100% because respondents could identify more than one barrier. (CDC, 2005)
  9. 9. Traffic Danger If more children walked or biked to school, it would reduce the number of cars near the school at pick-up and drop-off times making it safer for walkers and bicyclists and reducing traffic congestion. Parisi and Associates. Transportation tools to improve children's health and mobility: Look at what California is Doing. Accessed at www.dhs.ca.gov/epic/sr2s/documents/SR2S TranspoTools.pdf. http://www.pedbikeimages.org/imageDetail. cfm Picture courtesy of Dan Burden
  10. 10. Walkable Urbanism There's demographic evidence; there's consumer research evidence; but probably the most compelling evidence is the price premium people are willing to pay to live in a walkable urban place, that the survey's show anywhere from a 40% to 200% price premium on a price per square foot basis for a walkable urban place as oppose to a competitive near by drivable suburban place. Christopher B. Leinberger Visiting Fellow, Brookings
  11. 11. SOLUTION: MODE SHIFT Good News! We Can Fix It
  12. 12. How to Create Mode Shift Provide people with choices:  Invest in bicycle/pedestrian infrastructure  Calm traffic  Create Safe Routes to School  Build Transit Supportive development  Retrofit sprawling neighborhoods  Revitalize walkable neighborhoods  Education and Encourage Measuring the Health Effects of Sprawl; Barbara McCann and Reid Ewing; Smart Growth America and Surface Transportation Policy Project, 2003
  13. 13. Mode Shift  Infrastructure  Appropriate land-use and design  Interconnect modes, land-use, and infrastructure  Social Marketing – encouragement for behavior change
  14. 14. TO SUCCEED YOU HAVE TO: •ENGAGE THE PUBLIC •CREATE PLANS WITH VISION •PLAN FOR IMPLEMENTATION •BE CREATIVE WITH FUNDING OPTIONS You want this: And this:
  15. 15. Disconnected Land-Use Peds/Bikes - Afterthought Not This
  16. 16. Start with Plans Long Range Transportation Plan 2025 (LRTP 2025) adopted in 2004 by Champaign-Urbana Urbanized Area Transportation Study (CUUATS) big.small.all countywide visioning process called for more housing and mobility choices, less sprawl
  17. 17. More Community Transportation Plans Champaign Moving Forward: Transportation Master Plan 2008 – Update to Champaign’s Comprehensive Plan Urbana Bicycle Plan – Adopted plan becomes part of Comprehensive Plan
  18. 18. LRTP 2025 Preferred Scenario calls for:  Express bus service between core and fringe areas of the community  An enhanced arterial fringe road system that provides improved mobility around the community  Transit intensive corridors  High capacity transit system in the University District  Mixed use, denser development and redevelopment
  19. 19. If implemented LRTP 2025 will:  Create higher population density, less sprawl  Promote alternative transportation modes  Save money on infrastructure  Create walkable activity centers and reduce reliance on automobiles  Make travel safer for pedestrians and bicyclists  Increase mobility for motorists  Educate residents about alternative transportation modes, safety, and new transportation concepts
  20. 20. HOW Do We Implement the LRTP? Infill and having choices sounds good, but how do we get there while protecting new development and growth? miPLAN asked the community to tell us what they want.
  21. 21. miPLAN Mobility Implementation Plan miPLAN's Purpose - What mobility options does the community want, both now and in the future? To implement the LRTP 2025. LRTP found:  Cities do not have the $ to build and/or maintain new arterial roads serving fringe development. (Champaign has $50 million deficit in funding for arterial construction.)  If we continue with our current growth design, e.g. travel by auto, our community will face serious roadway congestion problems in less than 20 years.
  22. 22. Public Engagement: Neighborhood Transopoly® 22 Attribution: Jan Metzger, Center for Neighborhood Technology, 1950-2010
  23. 23. Summary of Public Input: Strong consistency found for the following top priority mobility improvements:  Improved bicycle infrastructure and routing  Better street lights  Additional sidewalks  Later evening MTD transit service  Additional direct MTD transit routes along major arterials
  24. 24. Mobility Enhanced Development Report Affordability Index Formula Affordability Index = Housing Costs + Transportation Costs* Income *Transportation Costs include the modeled cost of Auto Ownership, Auto Use, and Transit Use Identified opportunities for mobility enhanced development , e.g. development with mobility choices. Analyzes costs of housing and transportation to households. 24
  25. 25. MED Findings: Transportation costs in core significantly less than fringe. Average $/month spent on transportation: Core=$832 or less Fringe=$1372 or less. MED Recommendations: Build on current density and urban form. Maximize options and choices in alternative forms of mobility. Provide tools to create mixed-use, mixed-income market-rate developments through infill and redevelopment. Maintain affordability through community development programs and by factoring in both household housing and transportation costs.
  26. 26. C-U Encouraging Mode Shift  Zipcar- car share program launched 2009 with 6 cars now have 8 cars  Safe Routes to School  Bike route maps, bus wrap, bike counts, etc. work with cycling community  Marketing to public on options for mode choice
  27. 27. RETROFIT STREETS CONTROL ACCESS COMPLETE STREETS ROAD DIETS SAFE ROUTES TO SCHOOL Best Practices
  28. 28. Complete Streets What are complete streets, and complete streets policies?  Complete streets are designed and operated to enable safe access for all users. Pedestrians, bicyclists, motorists and transit riders of all ages and abilities must be able to safely move along and across a complete street.  Creating complete streets means transportation agencies must change their orientation toward building primarily for cars. Instituting a complete streets policy ensures that transportation agencies routinely design and operate the entire right of way to enable safe access for all users. Source: National Complete Streets Coalition - http://www.completestreets.org
  29. 29. Source: National Complete Streets Coalition
  30. 30. Road Diets
  31. 31. What is a Road Diet?
  32. 32. Bridgeport Way, University Place Washington  Major road 23,000 VPD  High speed limits, no sidewalks, high number of access points and uncontrolled access – high number of crashes many with injuries
  33. 33. After Road Diet: Transformed into Complete Street with bike lanes, sidewalks, and 8 roundabouts Flared intersections accommodate U-turns for large vehicles at signalized intersections Lighted landscaped medians improved access management and pedestrian safety – reduced crashes Bridgeport Way, University Place, Washington Pictures courtesy of Dan Burden
  34. 34. Bike lanes installed to reduce bike- automobile conflicts and crashes Interconnected signalized mid-block crossings optimized traffic progression while minimizing pedestrian-vehicular conflicts and crashes Road diet reduced crashes by 60% and speeds by 6% Bridgeport Way, University Place, Washington Pictures: Cynthia Hoyle, AICP, Hoyle Consulting
  35. 35. SRTS programs – part of the solution  Improve walking and biking conditions around schools  Reduce congestion around schools  Increases physical activity (10 minutes to school and 10 minutes home=20 minutes of daily physical activity)  Can lead to cost savings for schools (reduce need for “hazard” busing)  Others: increase child’s sense of freedom, help establish lifetime habits, teach pedestrian and bicyclist skills
  36. 36. Elements of SRTS programs  Education  Encouragement  Enforcement  Engineering  Evaluation Pictures: Cynthia Hoyle, AICP, Hoyle Consulting
  37. 37. Education & Encouragement Bike Rodeos Light the Night Bike Light Campaign Traffic Safety Workshops
  38. 38. Potential Issues Issues No Sidewalks on way to school Unsafe intersection/street to cross Distances too great Solutions Park and walk – use a local park or church parking lot Have school buses drop kids at designated location to walk to school with volunteers Walk around your school track/playground Have your local police dept. assist with walk Organize a Walking School Bus
  39. 39. WEBINARS REPORTS ORGANIZATIONS PROGRAMS Resources
  40. 40. Webinars
  41. 41. Safe Routes to School: Improves the Built Environment SRTS State Network Project: Final Report Reports
  42. 42. Report recommends combining strategies to significantly reduce GHG emissions:  Local and regional pricing/reg. that increase cost of SOV travel  Regulations to encourage eco-driving behavior/better fuel efficiency  Land use/smart growth that reduce travel distances  Expansion of multimodal travel options Moving Cooler – Report on Transportation and Reducing GHG Moving Cooler: An Analysis of Transportation Strategies that Reduce Green House Gas Emissions; Cambridge Systematics; July 2009
  43. 43. Organizations http://www.saferoutespartnership.org/home http://www.completestreets.org http://www.ite.org http://www.planning.org http://www.apbp.org
  44. 44. Programs http://www.walktoschool.org/index.cfm http://www.saferoutesinfo.org/index.cfm http://cufitfamilies.blogspot.com http://frc.illinois.edu/c-ufitfamilies.htm
  45. 45. Programs Interagency Partnership for Sustainable Communities  1. Provide more transportation choices.  2. Promote equitable, affordable housing.  3. Enhance economic competitiveness.  4. Support existing communities.  5. Coordinate policies and leverage investment.  6. Value communities and neighborhoods. HUD, DOT and EPA Partnership: Sustainable Communities June 16, 2009 http://www.epa.gov/smartgrowth/partnership/index.html
  46. 46. CUMTDSupportforModeShiftIncludes  miPLAN  Expansion of “unlimited access” to transit  Lead agency for Car-Share program  Major supporter of Safe Routes to School program and projects (International Walk to School Day)  First transit district in US to be certified as Bicycle Friendly Business by League of American Bicyclists  Major supporter of community bicycling campaigns (Bike to Work Month/Week/ Day, education campaigns, etc.)  Invested in the development of a community bike share program  Sponsoring plans for “Green Corridors” in the community
  47. 47. Community visibility promoting safety, healthy lifestyles, sustainability Coalition building Increases mode shift Benefits for Transit
  48. 48. It’s About Our Future: Active Transportation Benefits Everyone http://www.ccrpc.org/pl anning/transportation/l rtp2/index.html Cynthia Hoyle, AICP Hoyle Consulting Urbana, IL www.cynthiahoyle.com cynthia@cynthiahoyle.com www.cumtd.com www.ihavemiplan.com www.cu- srtsproject.com
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