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"Play to Change" Workshop - WebVisions Portland
 

"Play to Change" Workshop - WebVisions Portland

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Workshop with Carolyn Chandler and Jason Ulaszek. Experience design and game design have a lot in common, and the two worlds continue to come together. It's no wonder - we've all been playing games ...

Workshop with Carolyn Chandler and Jason Ulaszek. Experience design and game design have a lot in common, and the two worlds continue to come together. It's no wonder - we've all been playing games for millenia, to learn and grow or to get through tough challenges. So how can you incorporate the positive aspects of a game into the experiences you're designing for your customers? Learn more about basic game mechanics, and how they've been used to motivate learning, promote action, and prepare players (like your users) for complex scenarios.

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  • CC
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  • JUAlthough it provided a trendsetting examples for play, it recently is stating to move away from it as the primary experience with the latest redesign:http://www.digitaltrends.com/social-media/foursquare-redesign-ditches-gamification-emphasizes-recommendations/CC The way this appealed to multiple types of players
  • JUhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_video_gamesWorld-based games – Pitfall, Mario Brothers, Zelda role playing games
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  • JUHistory dates to 3100 BC in Egypt (Senet)Games are an integral part of society – an expression of human natureThey’re formalized expressions of play They capture ideas and behaviors of people during one period of time and carry them forward through timePainting of Egyptian Queen Nefertari playing Senet found in her tombSenet, 3100BChttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SenetThe Senetgameboard is a grid of thirty squares, arranged in three rows of ten. A senet board has two sets of pawns (at least five of each and, in some sets, more, as well as shorter games with fewer). The actual rules of the game are a topic of some debate, although historians have made educated guesses.
  • JUIt’s a central part of neurological growth and development (especially for kids)It helps you try things in a “safe” environmentIt delights the brain
  • CC In adults, it boosts creativity, imagination, and decision makingIt makes it easier to take risks and experiment, and gets us over fear of embarrassment and social rejection
  • CC Increases creativity
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  • CCA knowledge of what needs to be accomplished, and the basic rules that apply in the activity, provides structure so the participant can focus on the activity itself.This is where it’s extremely valuable to have an understanding of the target users of your product, and their likely skill sets.
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  • Ice breaker (15 minutes)Each participant draws a game interaction type from the hat2 teams per interaction typeGroups select from a list of games/physical games by type or self-selectBrainstorm on games that fit your type. Take one and discuss its experience in the group…How is it unique?How does it make you feel?What makes it challenging?How does it motivate you to act? Is it competitive? Cooperative?We get back together as a larger group to shareSimple discussionTakeaway – these are your teams. You’ll use this style of game play / interaction to create a game today.
  • Single Player vs. Game (Most console games, races to break a record)Player vs. Player (Boxing, Chess)Multiple Individual Players vs. Game (Wheel of Fortune, Jeopardy, Easter Egg hunts)Multilateral Competition (Mario Kart online)Unilateral Competition (Are You Smarter Than a 5th Grader, Tag, Marco Polo, Scotland Yard)Cooperative Play (World of Warcraft to kill a major monster/cross a level)Team Competition (Basketball, Cranium, Pictionary)Interesting crossovers – Werewolf/Mafia mixes cooperative play with competition
  • Ice breaker (15 minutes)Each participant draws a game interaction type from the hat2 teams per interaction typeGroups select from a list of games/physical games by type or self-selectBrainstorm on games that fit your type. Take one and discuss its experience in the group…How is it unique?How does it make you feel?What makes it challenging?How does it motivate you to act? Is it competitive? Cooperative?We get back together as a larger group to shareSimple discussionTakeaway – these are your teams. You’ll use this style of game play / interaction to create a game today.
  • JU, CC and participants
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  • CCZelda specs from 1985
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  • CC Achievementvs enjoyment – is it the outcome or the process that matters to them?Structure vs freedom – do they want to master skills through instruction, or to figure things out for themselves?Power – do they get it from dominion over others, or from their connection to community?Is it about their own progression, or overall progress?
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  • CCA cell phone platform SIMs-like game situated in college using characters as animals… the show Community…
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  • CCAchievementvs enjoyment – is it the outcome or the process that matters to them?Structure vs freedom – do they want to master skills through instruction, or to figure things out for themselves?Power – do they get it from dominion over others, or from their connection to community?Is it about their own progression, or overall progress?
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"Play to Change" Workshop - WebVisions Portland "Play to Change" Workshop - WebVisions Portland Presentation Transcript

  • 1#WebVisions1 #WebVisionsPlay to Change: Using Game Mechanicsto Motivate Your AudienceCarolyn Chandler @chananJason Ulaszek @webbit
  • 2#WebVisionsIntroductions@webbit @chanan
  • 3#WebVisionsPlay to Change: Using Game Mechanics to Motivate Your AudienceGAME PLAN
  • 4#WebVisionsThe Game Plan• Learn about important concepts in playful design• Understand basic game mechanics, and how to:– create an immersive environment for meaningful play– motivate learning and promote action• Explore misconceptions about gamification and design pitfalls toavoid• Try your own hand at techniques that will help you apply gamedesign concepts to your own work
  • 5#WebVisionsOur Rules of Play1. Why Games are Important (as Designers)2. Why We Play Them (as Humans)3. The Line-Up of Players4. Concept Design – Warm-Up5. Challenge #16. Detailed Design – Game Time7. Challenge #28. Challenge #39. Easter Eggs
  • 6#WebVisionsWe’re talking aboutGamification, right?
  • 7#WebVisionsWhat is Gamification?…it‟s the use of game mechanics to give an element of play,engagement, and motivation to interactions that previously may nothave been called “fun.”“A game is a problem-solving activity, approached with a playfulattitude.”Jesse Schell164 North State Street
  • 8#WebVisionsTop Gamification Myths1. Gamification is new.Tell that to Adam and Eve, who got history‟sbiggest level down on the Apple Challenge.2. Gamification is no different from a game. It‟s adistinction without a difference.The Olympic events are games. The medalceremonies with podiums and flags and nationalanthems are gamification.http://blog.gamemaki.com/2012/05/top-10-myths-of-gamification/
  • 9#WebVisionsTop Gamification Myths3. A lot of people won’t buy in.Everyone already buys in, whether it‟s fantasyfootball leagues or frequent flier programs orchurch raffles. Critics underestimate the degree towhich people everywhere are already innured togamification.4. Gamification exploits people.Bad gamification exploits people. Goodgamification empowers them.http://blog.gamemaki.com/2012/05/top-10-myths-of-gamification/
  • 10#WebVisionsOverlap of Game Design and UXPlayful Design: Creating Game Experiences in Everyday Interfaces, John Ferrara
  • 11#WebVisionsStill Battling it OutGartner‟s “Hype” Cycle for Adoption of New TechnologyPlayful Design: Creating Game Experiences in Everyday Interfaces, John Ferrara2013
  • 12#WebVisionsThere are 4 reasons why what we‟retalking about today is important toyou as a designer
  • 13#WebVisionsWhy this is so important for designers tounderstandOrganizations are realizing the benefits ofplay experiences – e.g. organizingaction for social change, personal healthhabits4
  • 14#WebVisionsBig Hair and the Start of Big Business• In the 1980‟s arcades pulled in about $2 billion/yr• In 2010 alone, over $25 billionAs reported by the Entertainment Software Association
  • 15#WebVisionsExperiences Like Foursquare Fueled a Fire
  • 16#WebVisionsWhy this is so important for designers tounderstandGenerations have grown upwith gaming3
  • 17#WebVisionsThe Console Gaming ExperienceMagnavox Odyssey (1972) Atari 2600 (1977)Nintendo Entertainment System (1985)
  • 18#WebVisions• The average young person in a gaming culture plays 10,000 hoursby age 21 (Jane McGonigal)• 10,000/(21yrs X 365days X 24hours) = .05 or 5%• Or… roughly the same number of hours spent in school from 5thgrade to high school (assuming no tardies)The 5%
  • 19#WebVisionsWhy this is so important for designers tounderstandData and technology advances havemade feedback more insightful andengaging – a powerful feedback loopmotivates you to keep going!2
  • 20#WebVisionsGamification and Wearables
  • 21#WebVisionsWhy this is so important for designers tounderstandGame mechanics are based onthe psychology of motivationand attention1
  • 22#WebVisionsWe‟ve Been Playing for a Looooong Time
  • 23#WebVisions“Play is often talkedabout as if it were arelief from seriouslearning. But forchildren play is seriouslearning. Play is reallythe work of childhood.”Won‟t you be my neighbor?
  • 24#WebVisions“To learn, we must ventureout to explore and probethe world around us. Tomotivate that exploration,our brain encourages us toplay.”
  • 25#WebVisionsWhat promotes afeeling of play?
  • 26#WebVisions“Flow” by Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi
  • 27#WebVisionsWhat helps encourage a flow state?• Present an activity that has a clear set of goals.• Balance the challenges you present and the skills of the participants.• Give clear feedback about the participant‟s performance as theyinteract.• Cut down on distractions if you can.
  • 28#WebVisionsAnd of course…FUN!“Fun is pleasure with surprises.”
  • 29#WebVisionsHow do games structureplay in different ways?
  • 30#WebVisionsWarm-Up1. Everyone take a slip of paper – eachrepresents a player interaction pattern2. Find and stay with those that have thesame interaction pattern.3. This is your game design team!
  • 31#WebVisionsPlayer Interaction PatternsTracy Fullerton, “Game Design Workshop”Single Player vs. GameMultiple Individual Players vs.GamePlayer vs. PlayerMultilateral CompetitionTeam CompetitionCooperative PlayUnilateral Competition
  • 32#WebVisionsWarm-Up1. Brainstorm 3-4 games that use your playerinteraction pattern2. Pick one of those and discuss:• What makes it challenging?• How does it motivate you to act?• How does it make you feel?• How is it unique?
  • 33#WebVisionsExamples of Game Types• Set Collection– Mahjong, Ticket to Ride• Social Paranoia– Werewolves, Mafia• Role Playing– Dungeons and Dragons• Resource Management– The Sims• Tile Laying– Carcassonne• Territory Control– Risk
  • 34#WebVisionsBack to Our Story…
  • 35#WebVisionsHow do games appeal appeal todifferent types of players?
  • 36#WebVisionsTypes of PlayersRichard Bartle, creator of MUD, said that there are primarily four types of players. Usually people are amix which can vary by age and game. If taken in a more black-and-white way, the general populationis roughly composed of 75% socializers, 10% either explorers or achievers, and 5% killers.People EnvironmentActingInteractingSocializersKillers AchieversExplorers
  • 37#WebVisionsTypes of PlayersTracy Fullerton rounds this out the following 10 types:1. The Competitor: Plays to best other players, regardless ofthe game2. The Explorer: Curious about the world. Loves to goadventuring: seeks outside boundaries, physical or mental3. The Collector: Acquires items, trophies, or knowledge. Likesto create sets, organize history, etc.4. The Achiever: Plays for varying levels of achievement:ladders and levels incentivize them
  • 38#WebVisionsTypes of Players5. The Joker: Doesn‟t take the game seriously. Plays for thefun of playing. May annoy other players but also make thegame more social than competitive.6. The Artist: Driven by creativity, creation, design.7. The Director: Loves to be in charge, direct the play8. The Storyteller: Loves to create or lives in worlds of fantasyor imagination9. The Performer: Loves to put on a show for others10. The Craftsman: Wants to build, craft, engineer, or puzzlethings out
  • 39#WebVisionsCommon Gamification Elements• Achievement "badges” and levels• Progress bars• Systems for awarding, redeeming, trading, gifting, and otherwiseexchanging some kind of currency• Challenges between users• Leader boards• Embedded, small casual games within other activities
  • 40#WebVisionsA Word of WarningGamification is NOT about adding “points” to something to makepeople perform certain actions.This could lead to point-seeking behavior.And it won‟t fix a product if that product doesn‟t fit the needs of youraudience.
  • 41#WebVisions#WebVisions 41http://chocolate-broccoli.comYOU CAN‟T JUST ADD CHOCOLATE
  • 42#WebVisionsAvoid adding chocolate to broccoli.Dont rush to the outcome.Focus on the path to your objective.The end should be valuable but the means should beenjoyable.Dont think in terms of a product.Think in terms of a system.
  • 43#WebVisionsPlay to Change: Using Game Mechanics to Motivate Your AudienceCONCEPT DESIGN
  • 44#WebVisionsKnow Your Audience• Who are you focusing on?• Where are you focusing them?• What are you trying to influence?• Are there important regulations to examine (e.g., COPPA)?
  • 45#WebVisionsPlayer ProfileA trait-based description of the players in a behavioralgame.Consider Drivers……Volition (intrinsic motivation)……and Faculty (skills and abilities)ACHIEVEMENT of goals |STRUCTURE and guidance |CONTROL of others |SELF-INTEREST in actions |ENJOYMENT of experienceFREEDOM to exploreACCEPTANCE of othersSOCIAL INTEREST in actions
  • 46#WebVisionsFour Critical Elements of the Game1. Story – the theme, or perhaps the relationship between the player andyour brand2. Aesthetics – which can be simpler than you may think3. Technology – pencil and paper, a mobile phone, downloads4. Mechanics – the procedures and rules of your game
  • 47#WebVisionsStory Ideas• High school drama• College themed• You play Cupid• You‟re a TV star• Hospital theme• Music themeTechnology Ideas• Cell phone platform• Handheld game• PC• Integrated with IM• Game consoleMechanics Ideas• SIMs like game• Interactive fiction game• The winner makes the mostfriends• Try to spread rumors aboutother players• Try to help as many people aspossible• TETRIS-like gameAesthetic Ideas• Anime style• All characters are animals• R&B music defines the game• Edgy/rock/punk music defines thefeel
  • 48#WebVisionsPsychology Behind Reward Structures• Three types of reinforcers:– Continuous – behavior reinforced each time it‟sperformed– Extinction – no instance of the behavior isreinforced– Intermittent – only some instances arereinforced• Can be positive or negativehttp://www.betabunny.com/behaviorism/Conditioning2.htmBurrhus Frederic (BF)Skinner (1904-1990)
  • 49#WebVisionsExamples of Positive and Negative Reinforcers• Positive– Gaining points and clearing rows– High Score or improving on a previousscore– Fitting blocks– Winning or advancing to the next level• Negative– Avoidance of losing– Build up of rows– Failure to beat an earlier high score
  • 50#WebVisionsFixed vs. Variable RewardVariable• the time or number of responses willvary around a particular number orrandomized number• Example: Slot machine playFixed• reinforcement occurs after a set period oftime or after a fixed number of responses• Example: A new ball after 10,000 points inpinball
  • 51#WebVisionsCREATE A GAME CONCEPTChallenge #1
  • 52#WebVisionsChallenge DetailsSetup• Classrooms often have a mix of students who are ahead (and bored) as well asstudents who are behind (and anxious or disengaged).• Often the students who are behind, are so partly because their parents are notengaged with their learning. Schools, who are strapped for resources, may notbe able to provide the 1-on-1 attention these students need.Challenge• Create a game concept that encourages peer-supported learning in order toengage students at different levels.• This can bring in other resources (like counselors) but should primarily “run” viaactivities of the students.• Consider all 4 elements of Story, Aesthetics, Technology and Mechanics (althoughsome may take more lead than others).
  • 53#WebVisionsPlay to Change: Using Game Mechanics to Motivate Your AudienceDETAILED DESIGN
  • 54#WebVisionsSKILLS (specialized abilities to develop - physical, mental, social)RESOURCES (spaces and supplies)RESISTANCE (opposition + uncertainty)ACTIONS (moves and decisions)FEEDBACK (system response)BLACK BOX (rules engine)Game NameACTIVITY (the real-world endeavor that the game is built upon)PLAYER PROFILE (trait-based descriptions of players, their drivers and symptoms)OBJECTIVES(shorttermandlongtermgoalsforgameplay)OUTCOMES(resultsfromaplayermeetingormissingshort-termgoals)Achievement |Structure |Control |Self-interest |EnjoymentFreedomAcceptanceSocial InterestBased on “Game Frame” by Aaron Dignan
  • 55#WebVisions Case Study – Que Social
  • 56#WebVisionsQueSocial Mechanics• Objective– Use social media channels to meet sales or recruiting goals (viaforming tiny habits)• Resistance– Competition, scarcity• Levels– Based on challenges finished in connecting, learning, andsharing
  • 57#WebVisionsSKILLS – a habit of sharing, good social media etiquette, responsivenessRESOURCES – web browser and accounts in one or more of the following:LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter. Login to QueSocial platform. Within game: points,learning modules, shareable content.RESISTANCE – scarcity (points), competitionACTIONS – Challenges like: connect with 5 new people on LinkedIn, shareQueSocial content with 3 people on Facebook, follow 5 new people on Twitter,thank someone who’s followed you, complete a training moduleFEEDBACK – points increase when the player refreshes the dashboard. Levelsincrease, and progress towards level completion is shown. New challengesappear when previous ones are completed.BLACK BOX (rules engine)On page refresh APIs withTwitter, Facebook, andLinkedIn are checked. Pointsand levels are changed withthe following values:• X points each for Challenges1-4 and 6-8• X points for Challenge #5(complete training #1)• X points for Challenge #8(share content)• Level up if Challenges 5 & 8are completed and at least 3of remaining challengesQueSocialACTIVITYUsing social media channelsPLAYER PROFILEProfessionals in sales and recruiting, who have explicit goals to meet. In particularthose who are not using social media channels regularly. This may be due both tolack of faculty (knowledge, skills) and volition (motivation, interest).OBJECTIVESLongterm:generateandclosemoreleads(salesandrecruiting)Shortterm:createmore,betterconnections;learnaboutsocialmediausageOUTCOMESChangeinvisibilityamongpeers,pointstotradeinforbenefits,accesstotrainingAchievement |Structure |Control |Self-interest |EnjoymentFreedomAcceptanceSocial InterestBased on “Game Frame” by Aaron Dignan
  • 58#WebVisionsSKILLS (specialized abilities to develop - physical, mental, social)RESOURCES (spaces and supplies)RESISTANCE (opposition + uncertainty)ACTIONS (moves and decisions)FEEDBACK (system response)BLACK BOX (rules engine)Game NameACTIVITY (the real-world endeavor that the game is built upon)PLAYER PROFILE (trait-based descriptions of players, their drivers and symptoms)OBJECTIVES(shorttermandlongtermgoalsforgameplay)OUTCOMES(resultsfromaplayermeetingormissingshort-termgoals)Achievement |Structure |Control |Self-interest |EnjoymentFreedomAcceptanceSocial InterestBased on “Game Frame” by Aaron Dignan
  • 59#WebVisionsObjectives• Objectives are goals toward which effort is directed.• They can be short term (activity completion) and long-term goals (the ultimate objective).• Breaking out goals helps players take on manageablechallenges and experience success to keep themplaying.• Example: The Objective is to balance out the classroomby encouraging advanced students to help the studentswho are behind. Related Goals: answer a question,mentor a student for 1 hour, etc.
  • 60#WebVisionsSKILLS (specialized abilities to develop - physical, mental, social)RESOURCES (spaces and supplies)RESISTANCE (opposition + uncertainty)ACTIONS (moves and decisions)FEEDBACK (system response)BLACK BOX (rules engine)Game NameACTIVITY (the real-world endeavor that the game is built upon)PLAYER PROFILE (trait-based descriptions of players, their drivers and symptoms)OBJECTIVES(shorttermandlongtermgoalsforgameplay)OUTCOMES(resultsfromaplayermeetingormissingshort-termgoals)Achievement |Structure |Control |Self-interest |EnjoymentFreedomAcceptanceSocial InterestBased on “Game Frame” by Aaron DignanACTIVITY (the real-world endeavor that the game is built upon)
  • 61#WebVisionsActivity• The activity is the real-world endeavor that thebehavioral game is based on – they‟re verbs• Choose something that you want players to domore, better, or differently.• Examples:– Studying (more often or more effectively)– Cooking (healthy food at home)– Driving (more safely)
  • 62#WebVisionsSKILLSRESOURCESRESISTANCEACTIONSFEEDBACKBLACK BOXGame NameACTIVITY- peer-supported learningPLAYER PROFILEOBJECTIVES-Longterm–increaseclassperformanceandinteractionbyencouragingstudent-to-studentmentoringOUTCOMESAchievement |Structure |Control |Self-interest |EnjoymentFreedomAcceptanceSocial InterestBased on “Game Frame” by Aaron Dignan
  • 63#WebVisionsSKILLS (specialized abilities to develop - physical, mental, social)RESOURCES (spaces and supplies)RESISTANCE (opposition + uncertainty)ACTIONS (moves and decisions)FEEDBACK (system response)BLACK BOX (rules engine)Game NameACTIVITY (the real-world endeavor that the game is built upon)PLAYER PROFILE (trait-based descriptions of players, their drivers and symptoms)OBJECTIVES(shorttermandlongtermgoalsforgameplay)OUTCOMES(resultsfromaplayermeetingormissingshort-termgoals)Achievement |Structure |Control |Self-interest |EnjoymentFreedomAcceptanceSocial InterestBased on “Game Frame” by Aaron Dignan
  • 64#WebVisionsPlayer Profile• A trait-based description of the players in abehavioral game.• Consider Drivers…• ...Volition (intrinsic motivation)…• …and Faculty (skills and abilities)ACHIEVEMENT of goals |STRUCTURE and guidance |CONTROL of others |SELF-INTEREST in actions |ENJOYMENT of experienceFREEDOM to exploreACCEPTANCE of othersSOCIAL INTEREST in actions
  • 65#WebVisionsSKILLSRESOURCESRESISTANCEACTIONSFEEDBACKBLACK BOXGame NameACTIVITY- peer-supported learningPLAYER PROFILE – Students from 7th grade to high schoollevel. Some are ahead and bored, others behind andanxious or disengaged.OBJECTIVESOUTCOMESAchievement |Structure |Control |Self-interest |EnjoymentFreedomAcceptanceSocial InterestBased on “Game Frame” by Aaron Dignan
  • 66#WebVisionsSKILLS (specialized abilities to develop - physical, mental, social)RESOURCES (spaces and supplies)RESISTANCE (opposition + uncertainty)ACTIONS (moves and decisions)FEEDBACK (system response)BLACK BOX (rules engine)Game NameACTIVITY (the real-world endeavor that the game is built upon)PLAYER PROFILE (trait-based descriptions of players, their drivers and symptoms)OBJECTIVES(shorttermandlongtermgoalsforgameplay)OUTCOMES(resultsfromaplayermeetingormissingshort-termgoals)Achievement |Structure |Control |Self-interest |EnjoymentFreedomAcceptanceSocial InterestBased on “Game Frame” by Aaron Dignan
  • 67#WebVisionsActions• Actions are moves available to the player.• It includes what they are allowed to do and the where,when, and how of them.• Actions influence the tone and style of a behavioralgame.• Examples:– Posting a question– Taking a quiz– Rating a comment
  • 68#WebVisionsSKILLS (specialized abilities to develop - physical, mental, social)RESOURCES (spaces and supplies)RESISTANCE (opposition + uncertainty)ACTIONS (moves and decisions)FEEDBACK (system response)BLACK BOX (rules engine)Game NameACTIVITY (the real-world endeavor that the game is built upon)PLAYER PROFILE (trait-based descriptions of players, their drivers and symptoms)OBJECTIVES(shorttermandlongtermgoalsforgameplay)OUTCOMES(resultsfromaplayermeetingormissingshort-termgoals)Achievement |Structure |Control |Self-interest |EnjoymentFreedomAcceptanceSocial InterestBased on “Game Frame” by Aaron Dignan
  • 69#WebVisionsSkills• Skills are learnable, specialized abilities put to usein behavioral games.• Generally they fall into these categories:– Physical skills (like running or keeping rhythm)– Mental skills (pattern recognition, memory…)– Social skills (presenting, meeting new people…)• Skill development should be valuable both in thegame and in the real world.
  • 70#WebVisionsSKILLS – mentoring, social skills, academicknowledge, good study habitsRESOURCESRESISTANCEACTIONSFEEDBACKBLACK BOXGame NameACTIVITY- peer-supported learningPLAYER PROFILEOBJECTIVESOUTCOMESAchievement |Structure |Control |Self-interest |EnjoymentFreedomAcceptanceSocial InterestBased on “Game Frame” by Aaron Dignan
  • 71#WebVisionsSKILLS (specialized abilities to develop - physical, mental, social)RESOURCES (spaces and supplies)RESISTANCE (opposition + uncertainty)ACTIONS (moves and decisions)FEEDBACK (system response)BLACK BOX (rules engine)Game NameACTIVITY (the real-world endeavor that the game is built upon)PLAYER PROFILE (trait-based descriptions of players, their drivers and symptoms)OBJECTIVES(shorttermandlongtermgoalsforgameplay)OUTCOMES(resultsfromaplayermeetingormissingshort-termgoals)Achievement |Structure |Control |Self-interest |EnjoymentFreedomAcceptanceSocial InterestBased on “Game Frame” by Aaron Dignan
  • 72#WebVisionsResources• Resources are the space and supplies that playersuse or can acquire.• Traditional games may have boards, pieces, cards,play money, or courts.• Digital games may have items carried, or virtualcurrency• Each item has attributes (what it can do and whatcan be done with it) and states (active/inactive, forexample).
  • 73#WebVisionsSKILLS (specialized abilities to develop - physical, mental, social)RESOURCES (spaces and supplies)RESISTANCE (opposition + uncertainty)ACTIONS (moves and decisions)FEEDBACK (system response)BLACK BOX (rules engine)Game NameACTIVITY (the real-world endeavor that the game is built upon)PLAYER PROFILE (trait-based descriptions of players, their drivers and symptoms)OBJECTIVES(shorttermandlongtermgoalsforgameplay)OUTCOMES(resultsfromaplayermeetingormissingshort-termgoals)Achievement |Structure |Control |Self-interest |EnjoymentFreedomAcceptanceSocial InterestBased on “Game Frame” by Aaron Dignan
  • 74#WebVisionsResistance• Resistance is the force of opposition thatcreates tension.• This is important because playing a game weknow we‟re going to win is no fun.• Examples are:– Competition– Chance– Time Pressure– Scarcity
  • 75#WebVisionsSKILLS (specialized abilities to develop - physical, mental, social)RESOURCES (spaces and supplies)RESISTANCE (opposition + uncertainty)ACTIONS (moves and decisions)FEEDBACK (system response)BLACK BOX (rules engine)Game NameACTIVITY (the real-world endeavor that the game is built upon)PLAYER PROFILE (trait-based descriptions of players, their drivers and symptoms)OBJECTIVES(shorttermandlongtermgoalsforgameplay)OUTCOMES(resultsfromaplayermeetingormissingshort-termgoals)Achievement |Structure |Control |Self-interest |EnjoymentFreedomAcceptanceSocial InterestBased on “Game Frame” by Aaron Dignan
  • 76#WebVisionsFeedback• Feedback is a system‟s response to a players actions.• It‟s what tells us the result of a decision.• Good feedback is a key building block as it helps theplayer evaluate their performance, and helps them gainconfidence in their faculty – their ability to meet theobjectives.• Examples of feedback:– A roomful of laughter (sound)– A speedometer‟s reading (data)
  • 77#WebVisionsSKILLS (specialized abilities to develop - physical, mental, social)RESOURCES (spaces and supplies)RESISTANCE (opposition + uncertainty)ACTIONS (moves and decisions)FEEDBACK (system response)BLACK BOX (rules engine)Game NameACTIVITY (the real-world endeavor that the game is built upon)PLAYER PROFILE (trait-based descriptions of players, their drivers and symptoms)OBJECTIVES(shorttermandlongtermgoalsforgameplay)OUTCOMES(resultsfromaplayermeetingormissingshort-termgoals)Achievement |Structure |Control |Self-interest |EnjoymentFreedomAcceptanceSocial InterestBased on “Game Frame” by Aaron Dignan
  • 78#WebVisionsBlack Box• The Black Box is a system‟s rules engine. This could bea computer program or a document (or just be in thedesigner‟s head).• It contains the information about ties between actionsand feedback (and if/then scenarios)• For Nike+:– The runner takes action by running at a certain pace– They get feedback in the form or auditory encouragement– The black box determines when it will play the audio
  • 79#WebVisionsSKILLS (specialized abilities to develop - physical, mental, social)RESOURCES (spaces and supplies)RESISTANCE (opposition + uncertainty)ACTIONS (moves and decisions)FEEDBACK (system response)BLACK BOX (rules engine)Game NameACTIVITY (the real-world endeavor that the game is built upon)PLAYER PROFILE (trait-based descriptions of players, their drivers and symptoms)OBJECTIVES(shorttermandlongtermgoalsforgameplay)OUTCOMES(resultsfromaplayermeetingormissingshort-termgoals)Achievement |Structure |Control |Self-interest |EnjoymentFreedomAcceptanceSocial InterestBased on “Game Frame” by Aaron Dignan
  • 80#WebVisionsOutcomes• Outcomes are the positive and negative results thathappen while in pursuit of the ultimate objective.• Positive outcome: tangible and intangible awards suchas moving up a level• Negative outcome: starting over or losing key resources
  • 81#WebVisionsCREATE DETAILS FOR YOURGAME CONCEPTChallenge #2
  • 82#WebVisionsChallenge DetailsChallenge• Detail the framework for one of your concepts - encouragingpeer-supported learning in order to engage students atdifferent levels.Reminder…• This can bring in other resources (like counselors) but shouldprimarily “run” via activities of the students.• If you need some inspiration, check out our playing cards.
  • 83#WebVisionsPOSTERIZE YOUR GAMEChallenge #3
  • 84#WebVisionsCase Study – Barbie Life in the Dreamhouse
  • 85#WebVisionsBarbie Life in the Dreamhouse Mechanics• Objective– Immerse players in the story of Barbie and her friends• Resistance– Scarcity, Targets• Levels– Based on participating in activities and exchanges, playinggames and watching videos
  • 86#WebVisionsInteracting with Barbie and Friends
  • 87#WebVisionsPink-tastically Toy-riffic Infographic
  • 88#WebVisionsMaking a Splash in the Dreamhouse Pool• Season 1 in June „12 (Season 2 October ‟12)• 22 languages• 400k+ players registered• 500 million B-Coins awarded• 325k hearts given out• 400k B-Gifts from characters to players• 500k “Love Its”• 20+ million videos watched
  • 89#WebVisionsChallenge DetailsChallenge• Design a poster that illustrates the overall game experience.
  • 90#WebVisionsEASTER EGGSPlay to Change: Using Game Mechanics to Motivate Your Audience
  • 91#WebVisionsActivity Motivators• Activity motivators are interactive features on a site thatare expressly added to encourage both an increase inthe amount and/or quality of an individual‟s activity on asite, and the overall growth of the community.• Examples of motivators are features that track thenumber of people you‟re connected to. On communitysites, common motivators center on building yournetwork, completing a goal, achieving levels of status,and building your reputation.
  • 92#WebVisionsConnectingOne of the most common features of a community site is theability to connect with people you know, and find new people toconnect with, adding them as friends or connections. There is acompetitive status with having a high total number ofconnections (which LinkedIn strengthens by making this numbervery prominent in lists and icons). Common motivations aremeeting new people, and maintaining closer contact with othersthat have proven relationships or shared interests.There’s a dopamine rush associated with getting a responseto anything you post.
  • 93#WebVisionsCollecting / CompletingCompleting a task has its own rewards, and completing a largergoal with multiple subtasks can be a motivator for repeat visitsand higher commitment. In a way, this can be like completing agame; it‟s nice to have others view your success (an indicator ofstatus), but the primary motivator is often a personal drive tocomplete and master a challenge. LinkedIn uses completenessas a motivator to encourage users to create a full profile. Key tothis is providing a visual indicator of progress, and clear andactionable methods to move towards completeness. A sense ofachievement can be attained with or without a prominentindication of status.
  • 94#WebVisionsStatusOne of the strongest motivators that can be introduced to a communityis the visible indication of status, which can be driven by a desire forpersonal status or by group competition. Status measures often do notrequire a large initial investment from the user, but allow people to growincrementally. They can range from subtle to direct, and private toprominent. For example, a subtle measure may simply be a statisticshown on a user‟s private profile page; a less subtle measure may be acomparison of that statistic against the same for the average user; anda direct measure may be the creation of distinct status levels such asMyC4‟s 10-levels indicating the amount a user has donated (which isalso fairly prominent, as it appears on a user‟s public profile page).
  • 95#WebVisionsStatusKeep in mind that introducing very blatant and prominent status measures in acommunity may alter the tone of the site depending on how it is presented, as itcan add a feeling of competition rather than cooperation. For a site centered ongiving that chooses to display status, it will be important to ensure those whogive once still feel the satisfaction of giving, but allow those who desire statusadditional access and visibility into these features.A benefit of this motivation for status is that it can be tied to reputation, leadingto a higher degree of integrity on the site overall. This is a key lynchpin foreBay‟s strategy, as a good reputation can directly impact your ability to makemoney or buy items on the site.
  • 96#WebVisionsReputationReputation motivators are a type of status motivator, with theadditional connotation of a user being considered reliable and/oran expert within the community. They are useful on socialnetworking sites that require trust between members or roles; forexample to ensure high-quality user-generated content, or high-integrity financial interactions. For example, a user on eBay mayhave sold many items (showing that they are highly active) butmay not have good feedback on the site, thus having a weakreputation. Reputation motivators can be a very effective way toreduce the amount of time and effort needed to police a site, asthe community itself performs much of the policing.
  • 97#WebVisionsGood Activity Motivators…• Reflect the primary business objectives driving the inclusion ofcommunity building features (for example, “increase theoverall number of donors” could be primary, while “increasethe overall amount of each donation” may be secondary)• Ideally, can only be attained and increased by actions that arepossible to perform via the site itself• Have a simple, easy to understand structure with a smallnumber of “moving parts”• Have consistent rules that rarely change (although additionalmethods for attaining status may be added)
  • 98#WebVisionsGood Activity Motivators…• Are visible in a central, personalized area such as a group orindividual profile• Have a low barrier to initial participation• Encourage repeat and incremental participation• Reward the user when a level or goal has been attained (thiscan be a tangible reward, like a gift, or a conceptual rewardlike a status level or other visual indicator of completion,status, reputation, etc.). Common methods for tracking andrewarding are counts, scores, levels, titles, and ratings.
  • 99#WebVisionsSocial Activities• Advocate• Argue• Comment• Compare• Compete• Curate• Explore• Express• Flirt• Give• Greet• Harass• Help• Join• Like• Mug• Poke• Rate• Read• Recommend• Share• Show off• Taunt• View• Vote
  • 100#WebVisionsCommon Gamification Elements• achievement "badges"• achievement levels• leader boards• a progress bar or other visual meter to indicate how close peopleare to completing a task a company is trying to encourage, such ascompleting a social networking profile or earning a frequent shopperloyalty award.• virtual currency• systems for awarding, redeeming, trading, gifting, and otherwiseexchanging points• challenges between users• embedding small casual games within other activities
  • 101#WebVisionsResources• The Art of Game Design, by Jesse Schell• Game Design Workshop• Gamification by Design, Gabe Zichermann• A Theory of Fun for Game Design, Ralph Koster• GamificationU.com• SeriousGames.org