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    Amia 00 Curriculum Presentation Amia 00 Curriculum Presentation Presentation Transcript

      • The Development
      • of a
      • Model Curriculum
      • for
      • Applied Health Informatics
      • H. Dominic Covvey
      • The University of Waterloo and Balanced View Consulting
      • Janice E. MacNeill
      • Humber River Regional Hospital
      AMIA 2000
    • A Model Curriculum for Applied Health Informatics Outline of Presentation
      • Definition of Applied Health Informatician (AHI) and Our Approach to Curriculum Development.
      • AHI Macro-Roles, the Challenges Faced by AHIs.
      • Example AHI Micro-Roles, and Skills and Knowledge for Selected Challenges.
      • AHI Competency Categories.
      • Next Steps
      • The University of Waterloo AHI Diploma Program.
      • Questions, Answers, and Discussion.
    • A Model Curriculum for Applied Health Informatics
      • Working Definition:
      • Applied Health Informatician
    • The Need for a Skills-Focused AHI Program Productive Health System AHI Macro-Roles
      • Based on J. Glaser, AMIA Spring 99 Workshop
      • Strategist and visionary.
      • Architect: information and systems (e.g., CIS).
      • Analyst of complex processes (e.g., referral patterns).
      • Designer (e.g., of efficient systems and processes).
      • Implementer.
      • Evaluator.
      • Manager.
    • A Model Curriculum for Applied Health Informatics
      • Our Approach
      • to
      • Curriculum Development
    • A Model Curriculum for Applied Health Informatics Our Approach
      • Define and characterize present and future AHI Macro-Roles.
        • CIO  Director
        • Analyst  Internal Consultant
      • Characterize the Challenges faced by AHIs in performing these roles.
        • IT/IM Strategic Planning.
        • Procurement.
      • Determine the Micro-Roles (sub-functions or tasks) AHIs must perform to address these challenges (identified a total of 184).
      • Identify the Skills, Knowledge and Experience (competencies) that will give the AHIs the required capabilities.
      • Define a Curriculum that imparts the skills, knowledge, and experience.
      • Local Objective: Design and develop a diploma program at the University
      • of Waterloo (EPHIP).
      Equate to job functions
    • A Model Curriculum for Applied Health Informatics Preliminary Work
      • Initial planning think-tank in 1994 (Boal, Covvey, Dixon, MacNeill).
        • Defined the AHI role.
        • Recognized the need for significant work to define a “body of skills”, and an AHI educ. program for people in the field.
      • Developed early versions of the Macro-Roles, Challenges, etc. template.
      • Held focus sessions on role-types, challenges, micro-roles, skills.
        • In April 1999, November 1999, January 2000.
        • Results: generated interest, and generated many improvements.
      • In Summer of 1999 conceptualized the HEALNet curriculum
      • development process; application for funding submitted in Fall/99.
    • A Model Curriculum for Applied Health Informatics The Curriculum Development Process
      • Obtained funding (MRC: COF- 37627 ) during the late Fall of 1999.
      • Performed stakeholder analysis and identified potential participants:
        • HI curriculum developers.
        • HI teachers.
        • Potential and current HI students.
        • Employers (health and health-related industries).
        • Representatives of professional organizations.
        • Potential certifiers of HI professionals.
      • Held a kick-off videoconference to prepare participants for work:
        • 11 locations across the U.S. and Canada participated.
        • Approximately 100 participants.
      • Developed templates containing straw versions of Macro-Roles, Challenges, and Micro-Roles, as well as some competencies.
    • A Model Curriculum for Applied Health Informatics The Curriculum Development Process (2)
      • Organized participants into 3 working groups, each with on-line (led by a facilitator) and offline components.
        • Applied Health Informatics (AHI). [Covvey]
        • Research and Development Health Informatics (RDHI). [Zitner]
        • Clinician Health Informatics (CHI). [Bernstein]
      • Convened ~10 2-hour on-line workshops involving each working group, beginning in March 2000.
        • Enabled by document and audioconferencing (Sprint’s)
        • Edited and expanded templates; discussed issues.
        • Materials circulated to off-line participants via e-mail.
      • Held a plenary session of all groups in June 2000 to review progress.
      • Completed on-line working group sessions in mid-September 2000.
    • A Model Curriculum for Applied Health Informatics The Curriculum Development Process (3)
      • Currently are reviewing, collating, and tabulating products.
        • Correlating Challenges with Macro-Roles (which position faces which challenges).
        • Documenting the Experience required versus each Challenge.
        • Performing individual quality reviews: 1-2 Challenges and their associated Micro-Roles and Competencies are reviewed for completeness by volunteers with relevant expertise.
      • Plan to release draft versions of documentation Nov. – Dec. 2000.
        • List of Macro-Roles and their definitions.
        • List of Challenges.
        • List of required Competencies relative to each challenge.
        • Mapping of Macro-Roles to Challenges.
        • Categorized (course-like) Competencies.
        • Guidelines for the definition of graduate level content.
    • A Model Curriculum for Applied Health Informatics Participants in AHI Curriculum Development
      • Mary Lou Ackerman, csehc@saintelizabeth.com
      • Sten Ardal, Central East Health Info Partnership, ardal@cehip.org
      • Ann Bolster, bolsta@cma.ca
      • Jennifer Briand, HEALNet, briandj@fhs.csu.mcmaster.ca
      • Heidi Brown, Data General Inc., [email_address]
      • Dominic Covvey*, University of Waterloo, dcovvey@sprynet.com
      • Deborah Del Duca, C dn. Health Record Assoc . , delduca@ibm.net
      • Myrna Francis, IBM, [email_address]
      • Candace Gibson, U . of Western Ontario, candaceg@julian.uwo.ca
      • Alan Goldstein, Meditech, [email_address]
      • Theodore Hoekman, Mem . U. of Nfld., thoekman@morgan.ucs.mun.ca
      • Lewis Hooper, Private Consultant, [email_address]
    • A Model Curriculum for Applied Health Informatics Participants in AHI Curriculum Development
      • Steven Huesing, Huesing and Associates, [email_address]
      • Carolyn Kay, Canadian Health Record Association, carokay@ibm.net
      • Kent Maclean, CIHI, kmaclean@cihi.ca
      • Janice MacNeill, Humber River Regional Hosp . , jmacneill@hrrh.on.ca
      • Naomi Mensink, N Mensink Consulting, nmensink@netcom.ca
      • David Mowat, Health Canada, david_mowat@hc-sc.gc.ca
      • Walter Panko, University of Illinois at Chicago, Wpanko@uic.edu
      • Keith Pearse, University of Alberta, kpearse@utah-inter.net
      • Denis Protti, University of Victoria, School of HIS, dprotti@uvic.ca
      • Annette Valenta, University of Illinois at Chicago, Valenta@uic.edu
      • Toby Walrod, University of Victoria, School of HIS, twalrod@uvic.ca
      • Patrick Yung, Health Information Services Program, yung@siast.sk.ca
    • A Model Curriculum for Applied Health Informatics
      • AHI
      • Macro-Roles
    • A Model Curriculum for Applied Health Informatics AHI Macro-Roles
        • IT Leader (CIO, VPIS,)
        • Director IS
        • Clinical Informatician
        • IT/IM Resources/Project Manager
        • Internal Health IT Consultant
        • System/Applications Expert
        • Process Analyst
        • Evaluator
        • Educator/Trainer
        • Programmer-Deployment Support
        • Policy Planner
    • A Model Curriculum for Applied Health Informatics Challenges Faced by AHIs
    • A Model Curriculum for Applied Health Informatics Challenges Faced by AHIs (30)
      • Collaboration.
      • Understanding of the Nature of the Health System and Current Issues, and Identification of Desired Outputs.
      • Formulation of IT/IM Components of the Strategic Plan.
      • IT/IM Strategic Business Planning, IT/IM Strategic Market Planning.
      • IT/IM Needs Analysis.
      • Determination of the Organization’s IT/IM Situation (IT/IM Audit).
      • Definition and Implementation of Organizational Approach to IT/IM, IT/IM Organizational Structure/Culture, and IS Department Structure/Culture.
      • Determination of the State of the Industry, Analysis of the Competition, and Identification of Viable Vendors and Solutions.
      • IT/IM Technology Assessment.
      • Evaluation, Adoption, and Implementation of Standards .
    • A Model Curriculum for Applied Health Informatics Challenges Faced by AHIs (30)
      • IT/IM-Related Policy Development.
      • Development of the Justification For and the Value of Systems.
      • Obtaining Consensus on Solutions, Budget, Plan.
      • Procurement of Solutions (Products and Services).
      • Re-engineering of Work and Information Management Processes.
      • Implementation of Solutions.
      • Planning and Day-to-Day Management of IT/IM Resources.
      • Management of Other’s (e.g., Population, System) Data (Quality Audits, Combining Data, Transmission, etc.).
      • Integration of Multiple Systems.
      • Maintenance and Support of Solutions.
      • Evaluation of Solution Outcomes.
      • Management of Change (Acting as Change Agent).
      • User, Customer, Inter-Departmental and Public Liaison, Relations, Communications, and Publication .
    • A Model Curriculum for Applied Health Informatics Challenges Faced by AHIs (30)
      • Evaluation of Solution Outcomes.
      • Management of Change (Acting as Change Agent).
      • User, Customer, Inter-Departmental and Public Liaison, Relations, Communications, and Publication.
      • Continuing Education.
      • System and Methods Customization and Ad Hoc Development.
      • Utilization of Technology (Personal Productivity, Specific Tools).
      • General Day-to-Day Issues .
    • A Model Curriculum for Applied Health Informatics
      • Example AHI Micro-Roles
    • A Model Curriculum for Applied Health Informatics Micro-Roles: Example (1)
      • Challenge : Formulation of IT/IM Components of the Strat. Plan
        • Micro-Roles:
          • Comprehension of Organizational Strategy
          • Interpretation (e.g., Translating IT Concepts + Industry to Management; bridging)
          • Presentation of Potential Strategic Opportunities for IT/IM
          • Involvement of Senior Management in IT/IM Strategic Planning Process
          • Involvement of Other Stakeholders in the IT/IM SP Process
          • Development of IT/IM Responses (IT/IM Strategic Requirements)
          • Strategic Options Analysis
          • Development of Multi-Year Budget
          • Promoting the Plan and Budget Throughout the Organization and to the Board
          • Management of Expectations
    • A Model Curriculum for Applied Health Informatics Micro-Roles: Example (2)
      • Challenge : Procurement of Solutions (Products and Services) .
        • Micro-Roles (Non-Vendor):
          • Mobilization and Mgmt of Stakeholder Participation in the Proc. Process
          • Development of Statement of Required Capabilities (Functional and Informational), Required Performance, Technologies, Other Requirements, and System Architecture
          • RFP or Other Procedure for Obtaining Vendor Responses
          • Management and Documentation of Site Visits, Demos, and Other Assessments
          • Assessment or Defn of Business Ethics Environment and Applic. Laws
          • Evaluation of Compliance of Vendors’ Offerings with Requirements and Architecture
          • Identification of Preferred Solutions
          • Preparation and Negotiation of Contracts
          • Contract Finalization and Ordering
    • A Model Curriculum for Applied Health Informatics
      • AHI Skills and Knowledge
    • A Model Curriculum for Applied Health Informatics Example Skills and Knowledge
      • Challenge : Formulation of IT/IM Components of the Strategic Plan
        • Micro-Role: Comprehension of Organizational Strategy
          • Skills: Listening Skills, Synthesizing Skills, Systems Thinking
          • Knowledge: The Nature and Operation of the Health System, Health System Management and Organization, Understanding Corporate Culture (regarding acceptable approaches, methods, values), Principles of Systems Thinking
        • Micro-Role: Interpretation (e.g., Translating IT Concepts + Industry to Management; bridging)
          • Skills: Forecasting Skills, Communication Skills, Failure Analysis
          • Knowledge : IT and IM Basic Concepts, The Nature and Operation of the Health System, The Nature and Capabilities of Health IT/IM Vendors and Products, Principles of Failure Analysis; Knowledge of How Non-Health Organizations Address IT/IM
    • A Model Curriculum for Applied Health Informatics Example Skills and Knowledge
      • Challenge: Formulation of IT/IM Components of the Strategic Plan
        • Micro-Role: Presentation of Potential Strategic Opportunities for IT/IM
          • Skills: Presentation Skills, Data Analysis Skills, Leadership Skills, Communication Skills, Interpretation, Teaching Skills
          • Knowledge: The Nature and Capabilities of Health IT/IM Vendors and Products, Infrastructural Technologies, The Nature and Operation of the Health System
      •  
        • Micro-Role: Involvement of Senior Management in IT/IM Strategic Planning (SP) Process
          • Skills: Motivation Techniques, Leadership Skills, Facilitation Skills, Communication Skills
          • Knowledge: Health System Management and Organization, Understanding Business and Clinical Processes, The IT/IM Strategies of Other Organizations
    • A Model Curriculum for Applied Health Informatics Skills and Knowledge Elements
      • Identified:
        • Skills: 203
        • Knowledge Elements: 167
      • These were subsumed under 22 “competency categories” that roughly correlate with courses or course modules.
        • Some might be pre-requisites.
    • A Model Curriculum for Applied Health Informatics
      • AHI Competency Categories
    • A Model Curriculum for Applied Health Informatics Competency Categories
      • We have identified 22 competency categories:
        • Personal Competencies for AHI Professionals
        • General Computing Competencies for AHI Professionals
        • Health Computing Competencies for AHI Professionals
        • Key IT Usage Competencies for AHI Professionals
        • General Health System-Related Competencies
        • General Business and Management Competencies
        • General IS Department Management Competencies
        • Team and Human Resources Management Competencies
        • Re-Engineering and Management of Change Competencies
        • Strategic and Operational Planning Competencies
        • Assessment of the Value, Effects, and Cost of IT (Competencies)
    • A Model Curriculum for Applied Health Informatics Competency Categories
      • We have identified 22 competency categories (2):
        • General Technology/Systems Life-Cycle Management Competencies
        • Procurement Competencies
        • Systems Implementation and Integration Competencies
        • Systems Maintenance and Support Competencies
        • System Customization/Ad Hoc Development Competencies
        • Project Management Competencies
        • Education and Training Competencies
        • Vendor/Service Provider Competencies
        • User and Process Observation and Assessment Competencies
        • Security Management Competencies
        • Information and Data Collection, Analysis and Management Competencies
    • A Model Curriculum for Applied Health Informatics
      • Example Competency Category
      • With
      • Skills and Knowledge
    • A Model Curriculum for Applied Health Informatics Example Competency Category
      • Procurement Competencies
        • Skills
          • Acceptance Testing Method/Procedure
          • Compliance Analysis Techniques
          • Contract Framework
          • Contract Negotiation Technique
          • Procurement Method (Including RFI/Q and RFP Writing, Site Visit Design and Analysis Technique, Demo Design and Analysis Technique)
          • Needs Analysis Method
          • Scenario Development Skills
          • User Group Framework
          • User Satisfaction and Acceptance Analysis and Management
          • Vendor Viability Assessment Framework
          • Vendor/Product Comparison Framework
    • A Model Curriculum for Applied Health Informatics Example Competency Category
      • Procurement Competencies
        • Knowledge
          • Application Domain, Knowledge of Specific
          • Contract Development, Principles of
          • Corporate Strategy and Current Offerings, Knowledge of
          • Health IT Product Knowledge, Basic
          • Health IT/IM Vendors and Products , The Nature and Capab . of
          • Industry M k ting, Promotion, and Sales Techniques, Knowledge of
          • Needs Assessment and Evaluation, Principles of
          • Product/Vendor State-of-the-Art, Knowledge of
          • Products, Knowledge of Specific
          • Requirements, Knowledge of Specific
          • System Testing and Validation, Principles of
          • User Acceptance Analysis, Principles of
          • User Modeling, Principles of
          • Vendor Marketplace, Knowledge of
          • Vendor Values, Knowledge of
    • A Model Curriculum for Applied Health Informatics
      • Next Steps
    • A Model Curriculum for Applied Health Informatics Next Steps
      • Packaging and Publication of initial products of all 3 curriculum development efforts.
      • Consultation process: circulation to interested parties for improvement.
      • Place materials on their permanent website.
      • Development of a tool for students to determine educational needs.
      • Development of a tool for recruiters and human resources specialists to determine competency requirements for positions.
    • A Model Curriculum for Applied Health Informatics
      • The U of Waterloo
      • Diploma in AHI Program
    • A Model Curriculum for Applied Health Informatics Orientation of the U of Waterloo Program
      • A special emphasis will be placed on the skills component of the curriculum.
        • This will make the program most relevant to AHI practioners.
      • Individual skill, knowledge, and experience elements will be delivered in the form of short, intense, and well-structured vignettes or “micro-courses” (modules of 1-3 hours) that are introduced via cases.
      • We believe these micro-courses will be highly suited to adult learning patterns.
      • They will be presented via distance education techniques (audio plus document conferencing) to ad dress the needs of those already in the field.
      • For further information, contact: dcovvey@sprynet.com [email_address]
    • A Model Curriculum for Applied Health Informatics
      • Questions, Answers, and Discussion
    • A Model Curriculum for Applied Health Informatics
      • Reserve Slides
    • A Model Curriculum for Applied Health Informatics The Applied Health Informatician
      • Information and information technology…
        • Needs and requirements elucidators.
        • Problem characterizers, clarifiers, and solvers.
        • Solution finders and procurers.
        • Solution deployers, implementers, and evaluators.
        • Solution and resources managers.
      • The AHI is driven by the needs of the health environment.
      • AHIs must be able:
        • to understand the problem and the need for solutions.
        • To consider alternate solutions and determine the optimal solution
        • deliver the solution that addresses the need.
      • We contrast this with Theoretical Health Informaticians, who are
      • fundamentally scientists, conceivers of new knowledge and creators of
      • new tools, often driven by their own interests.
    • A Model Curriculum for Applied Health Informatics Health IT Deployment Models
      • Employers of AHIs: As-Is Technology Deployers
        • Use proven COTS.
        • Are risk aversive.
        • Creativity is focused on implementation and gaining value.
        • Not developers.
      • Employers of RDHIs: Innovators/Academic Organizations
        • Early adopters (alpha or beta), developers, customizers.
        • Risk takers.
        • Creativity focused on creating functionality and capability.
        • Two types:
          • True Innovators: develop new solutions.
          • Limited Innovators: adopt bleeding edge solutions.
      • Hybrids:
        • Mixed approach: mostly COTS, but some development or customization.