Information Overload Phenomena
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Information Overload Phenomena

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Highlights from a global productivity survey of 2,000 knowledge workers indicate that approximately 6.78 hours per week are spent managing and consolidating information such as documents, emails and ...

Highlights from a global productivity survey of 2,000 knowledge workers indicate that approximately 6.78 hours per week are spent managing and consolidating information such as documents, emails and web research. UK spends 7.08 hours per week managing information whilst France spends 6.69 hours and Germany spends 5.91 hours per week.
In USA Information Overload costs a minimum of $900 billion per year in lowered employee productivity and reduced innovation. This is a fairly conservative number and reflects the loss of 25% of the employee’s day
Highlights from a global productivity survey of 2,000 knowledge workers indicate that approximately 6.78 hours per week are spent managing and consolidating information such as documents, emails and web research. UK spends 7.08 hours per week managing information whilst France spends 6.69 hours and Germany spends 5.91 hours per week.
In USA Information Overload costs a minimum of $900 billion per year in lowered employee productivity and reduced innovation. This is a fairly conservative number and reflects the loss of 25% of the employee’s day

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Information Overload Phenomena Information Overload Phenomena Document Transcript

  • INFORMATION OVERLOAD Summary The customer sought information was articles, reports, studies on the ―Information overload phenomena‖. The researcher has categorized information as Information overload, data traffic and information consumption. Comprehensive research was conducted as per customer requirements through separate searches. To view details of the methodology undertaken and challenges encountered within the process of this research: please click The summary of the findings are as follows: Section 1 - Information Overload  In 2010, 1.2 zettabytes of digital information will be created, according to a new "Digital Universe" study from IDC sponsored by IT firm EMC Corporation.  International Data Corp. reports that the digital universe will hit 1.8 zettabytes (a zettabyte is 1 billion terabytes) by 2011.  Information Overload would be the 2008 ―Problem-of-the-Year.‖  Overload costs the U.S. economy a minimum of $900 billion per year, it appears that it will be 2009’s problem as well.  Workers spend up to 50 percent of their day managing information. Section 2 - Information Clutter  Knowledge workers spend their days, according to Basex: - 28%-Unnecessary interruptions followed by "recovery time" to get back on track - 25%-Creating content-productive! - 20%-Meetings-some productive, some not - 15%-Searching for information (and an estimated 50% of searches fail) - 12%-Thinking and reflecting  Reducing the time wasted dealing with information overload by 15% could save a company with 500 employees more than $2 million a year. Cutting the wasted time by just 15% through automation would save U.S. enterprises more than $270 billion.  62 percent of professionals report that they spend a lot of time sifting through irrelevant information to find what they need; 68 percent wish they could spend less time organizing information and more time using the information that comes their way.  In an 8.89-hour average workday, employees said they spent 7.89 hours conducting research, attending meetings and searching for documents, the survey found.
  • Information Overload Reported on: 25-03-2010 athandz Contd. Summary Section 2 - Information Clutter Contd  Conservative estimates by IDC suggest that an organisation with 1,000 employees wastes at least $2.5 million per year by failing to find existing information, searching for outdated information, or recreating information that is outdated and poorly designed.  Highlights of the average number of hours spent globally per week by knowledge workers on the four main business activities include: 9.00 hours a week is spent on preparing, running and summarising actions for meetings while 6.78 hours are spent managing and consolidating information such as documents, emails and web research.  UK comes last in information management, spending 7.08 hours per week, with France spending 6.69 and Germany 5.91 hours. Section 3 - How Information Overload Affects Employers  Harvard Business Review found that the average worker today spends 40% of the work day merely processing information. This translates into only 60% of the average work day being spent on true value creation activities. 40% of the payroll costs are spent handling the overload. The more time spent on processing information and not creating value, the less a company earns.  Employees lose 28% in distraction which is their time at full pay that they aren't producing any value for the employer.  Manager’s report spending an average of 42% of their time on administrative tasks.  The administrative overload is greatest in Spain and the United Kingdom.  The analysis also found that for every 1 point reduction in the amount of supervisors’ available time, worker unproductive time falls by 0.1 percentage points. Section 4 – Data Traffic  The rapid growth of data consumption is real, has been observed by many operators.  Growing problem of mobile data consumption vs. revenue: perhaps 100X growth of aggregate data vs. 2X growth of revenue (in the next 5 years)  App Store, has defined a model of data services on demand that is widely appealing, with 500 M downloads in less than a year of operation, establishing that there is a large market for data services. 2
  • Information Overload Reported on: 25-03-2010 athandz Contd. Summary Section 5 - Information Consumption 5.1 U.S Information Consumption  Roughly 3.6 zettabytes (or 3,600 exabytes) of information were consumed in American homes in 2008.  The big winner is still television at almost 45 percent of our daily allowance, but the computer is a not- too-distant second at about 27 percent.  In all, we spend about 11.8 hours per day absorbing mass quantities of information, sometimes multitasking in front of multiple screens simultaneously. 5.2 Metadata  In 2008, non-textual media storage requirements (audio, music, images, and video) were an estimated 16 exabytes. (An exabyte is a billion Gbytes.)  Subscription-based and download media sales totaled $3.3 billion in 2008 5.3 Data Superabundance  Enterprise Data Growth in the next 5 years is estimated to be 650%  80% of this data will be unstructured data  40 exabytes* of unstructured new information will be generated worldwide in 2009  IDC estimated the amount of data stored worldwide in 2007 was nearly 300 exabytes, and that this number will grow ten-fold by 2011. Methodologies and Challenges  Search was directed towards details about Information Overload.  The researcher has provided a global outlook of information overload from the productivity perspective. However, most of the studies conducted mainly concentrated on USA.  The researchers have extracted information from several sources. This was quite time consuming as an extensive reading of articles were required.  The researcher spent maximum time utilized for the query. 3
  • Information Overload Reported on: 25-03-2010 athandz TABLE OF CONTENTS SUMMARY............................................................................................................................................. 1 SECTION 1 – INFORMATION OVERLOAD .................................................................................... 5 SECTION 2 – INFORMATION CLUTTER ..................................................................................... 10 SECTION 3 – HOW INFORMATION OVERLOAD AFFECTS EMPLOYERS ......................... 22 SECTION 4 - DATA TRAFFIC .......................................................................................................... 24 SECTION 5 - INFORMATION CONSUMPTION ........................................................................... 27 5.1 U.S INFORMATION CONSUMPTION ................................................................................................ 27 5.2 METADATA ................................................................................................................................... 29 5.3 DATA SUPERABUNDANCE ............................................................................................................. 30 FEEDBACK .......................................................................................................................................... 32 WANT TO KNOW MORE DETAILS ABOUT OUR RESEARCH SERVICES? ........................ 32 4
  • Information Overload Reported on: 25-03-2010 athandz Section 1 – Information Overload Article 1 - Zettabytes Now Needed to Describe Global Data Overload Key Facts  Humankind will generate over one sextillion bytes of digital information this year, surging into the realm of the "zettabyte" as we create ever more electronic data.  In 2010, 1.2 zettabytes of digital information will be created, according to a new "Digital Universe" study from IDC sponsored by IT firm EMC Corporation.  Even during the recession of 2009, the glut of digital information expanded 62 percent over the previous year to 800 billion gigabytes. Source Date May 04,2010 Source http://www.technewsdaily.com/zettabytes-now-needed-to-describe-global-data- overload-0513/ Article 2 - Data Glut! The Answer Is Innovation Key Facts  Data is piling up fast at almost every business, from financial corporations to online shopping sites. Security log files, network events, transaction records. e- mail and more are flooding firms with information.  International Data Corp. reports that the digital universe will hit 1.8 zettabytes (a zettabyte is 1 billion terabytes) by 2011.  That’s a tenfold increase in the next five years. IDC says growth is running at an annual rate of 60 percent. And the cost of data management is significant  At Teradata we’re committed to innovation that’s keeping companies a couple of steps out in front of the data information glut.  Teradata 13, our latest data warehouse database, reveals our deep commitment to engineering excellence that provides a powerful system to work with the wide variety of data that are pounding enterprise IT data systems. Source Date February 15, 2010 Source http://www.basexblog.com/2008/12/19/information-overload-now-900-billion-what- is-your-organizations-exposure/ 5
  • Information Overload Reported on: 25-03-2010 athandz Contd. Section 1 – Information Overload Article 3 - Causes of Information Overload Key Facts Information overload is one of the pressing issues of today’s increasingly fast-paced, complex and communication-intensive business world. As we have seen from this chapter, reducing information overload is also the responsibility of communicators and not just of those receiving information. Source Date March 2009 Source http://s3.amazonaws.com/ppt-download/informationoverload-090702133826- phpapp02.pdf?Signature=gm5npY0NxXsaR0F%2BCykZW6jh3Vs%3D&Expires=127 3783849&AWSAccessKeyId=AKIAJLJT267DEGKZDHEQ 6
  • Information Overload Reported on: 25-03-2010 athandz Contd. Section 1 – Information Overload Article 4 - Calculating Information Overload – Find out Your Organization’s Cost Key Facts  A year ago, Basex announced that Information Overload would be the 2008 “Problem-of-the-Year.”  Now that we know that Information Overload costs the U.S. economy a minimum of $900 billion per year, it appears that it will be 2009’s problem as well.  Information Overload causes: - Markedly lower productivity, - Diminished comprehension levels, - Compromised concentration levels, - Less innovation.  According to a recent Basex survey, it also causes health problems: 35% of knowledge workers experience work-related back and/or neck pain, carpal tunnel syndrome, eye strain, headaches, or stress related symptoms. Source Date January 13, 2009 Source http://www.iocalculator.com/ http://iorgforum.org/blog/2009/01/13/calculating-information-overload-find-out-your- organizations-cost/ 7
  • Information Overload Reported on: 25-03-2010 athandz Contd. Section 1 – Information Overload Article 5 - Information Overload: Now $900 Billion Key Facts  Information overload describes an excess of information that results in the loss of ability to make decisions, process information, and prioritize tasks.  It remains a key challenge for companies that operate in the knowledge economy but it is nothing new. Indeed, it was very much on the minds of thought leaders of an earlier information age centuries ago, including Roger Bacon, Samuel Johnson, and Konrad Geßner whose 1545 Bibliotheca universalis warned of the “confusing and harmful abundance of books” and promulgated reading strategies for coping with the overload of information.  Workers spend up to 50 percent of their day managing information, according to a recent survey conducted by Basex of more than 3,000 knowledge workers, and streamlining these processes can have a significant impact on productivity. But determining the extent of the problem is the first step.  Information Overload costs the U.S. economy a minimum of $900 billion per year in lowered employee productivity and reduced innovation.  Despite its heft, this is a fairly conservative number and reflects the loss of 25% of the knowledge worker’s day to the problem. The total could be as high as $1 trillion. Source Date December 19, 2008 Source http://www.basexblog.com/2008/12/19/information-overload-now-900-billion-what- is-your-organizations-exposure/ 8
  • Information Overload Reported on: 25-03-2010 athandz Contd. Section 1 – Information Overload Article 6 - Six Communication Principles for Overload Environments Key Facts We phrase these principles as paradoxes in order to motivate communicators to apply those mechanisms carefully, e.g., balancing reduction and transformation based on the specific communication context. Their sequence follows the goals of: 1. Getting attention. 2. Ensuring comprehension. 3. Fostering retention. Source Date March 2009 Source http://s3.amazonaws.com/ppt-download/informationoverload-090702133826- phpapp02.pdf?Signature=gm5npY0NxXsaR0F%2BCykZW6jh3Vs%3D&Expires=12 73783849&AWSAccessKeyId=AKIAJLJT267DEGKZDHEQ 9
  • Information Overload Reported on: 25-03-2010 athandz Section 2 – Information Clutter Article 1 - Tackling Information Overload Key Facts The compelling statistic: Basex estimates, based on data it has gathered, that information overload costs the U.S. economy a minimum of $900 billion a year in lost productivity and reduced innovation.  Knowledge workers spend their days, according to Basex: - 28%-Unnecessary interruptions followed by "recovery time" to get back on track - 25%-Creating content-productive! - 20%-Meetings-some productive, some not - 15%-Searching for information (and an estimated 50% of searches fail) - 12%-Thinking and reflecting  Simple ways to save time and to manage information overload. - Breathe-Schedule breaks in your work routine. - Simplify your schedule-Schedule meetings on specific days, leaving others free. - Back it up - Declutter your desktop (both of them). - Touch it once-and respond, file, or delete. - Forget the free stuff (choose quality over quantity). - Use your tools, such as your smartphone. - RSS reprieve-Sign up with an aggregator. - Manage mobile madness-Use a mobile device and deal with things as they arise. Source Date May 04, 2009 Source http://newsbreaks.infotoday.com/Spotlight/Tackling-Information-Overload-53712.asp 10
  • Information Overload Reported on: 25-03-2010 athandz Contd. Section 2 – Information Clutter Article 2 - Growth of Enterprise Information Key Facts  Each year the amount of information created in the enterprise, paper and digital combined grows faster than 65%.  Non-productive information work, such as reformatting documents or reentering documents into computers, consumed more than $1.5 trillion in U.S. salaries last year.  Survey respondents spend as much as 26% of their time trying to manage information overload.  Respondents split their time evenly between dealing with paper and digital information, but 71% prefer to deal with digital information.  The amount of time U.S. information workers spent last year managing paper- driven information overload cost $460 billion in salaries.  Respondents whose companies do a good job managing information overload rate technology as a significant help.  Reducing the time wasted dealing with information overload by 15% could save a company with 500 employees more than $2 million a year. Source Date March 2009 Source http://www.xerox.com/downloads/usa/en/n/nr_IDC_White_Paper_on_Information_O verload.pdf 11
  • Information Overload Reported on: 25-03-2010 athandz Contd. Section 2 – Information Clutter Article 3 - The Hidden Coast of Information Work Key Facts  Cutting the wasted time by just 15% through automation would save U.S. enterprises more than $270 billion.  For a company with 500 information employees, that amounts to more than $2 million a year. Source Date March 2009 Source http://www.xerox.com/downloads/usa/en/n/nr_IDC_White_Paper_on_Information_O verload.pdf 12
  • Information Overload Reported on: 25-03-2010 athandz Contd. Section 2 – Information Clutter Article 4 - Benefits of Integrating Paper and Digital Key Facts  If their interactions with paper were eliminated entirely, they could save 40 minutes a day on average.  Companies whose respondents most suffered from information overload could gain an additional 48 minutes. Source Date March 2009 Source http://www.xerox.com/downloads/usa/en/n/nr_IDC_White_Paper_on_Information_O verload.pdf 13
  • Information Overload Reported on: 25-03-2010 athandz Contd. Section 2 – Information Clutter Article 5 - Frequency of Information Overload Key Facts  In a global survey IDC conducted in 2008, we found that 75% of workers in more than 1,000 large organizations said they suffered from information overload.  Of those, 45% said they were ―overwhelmed.‖ Source Date March 2009 Source http://www.xerox.com/downloads/usa/en/n/nr_IDC_White_Paper_on_Information_O verload.pdf 14
  • Information Overload Reported on: 25-03-2010 athandz Contd. Section 2 – Information Clutter Article 6 - Types of Information Causing Information Overload Key Facts  The old information types never seem to go away – paper forms, documents, drawings, data base output, emails, faxes, files and records, and phone messages.  Meanwhile, new forms have sprouted, from text and instant messages to blogs, wikis, social networks, podcasts, digital images and sounds, and even digital ―stickies.‖ 15
  • Information Overload Reported on: 25-03-2010 athandz Contd. Section 2 – Information Clutter Source Date March 2009 Source http://www.xerox.com/downloads/usa/en/n/nr_IDC_White_Paper_on_Information_O verload.pdf Article 7 - Industries Facing Information Overload Key Facts Areas that produced the most paper output from their information system seemed to be accounting and finance, administrative and executive departments, marketing, and customer support. Source Date March 2009 Source http://www.xerox.com/downloads/usa/en/n/nr_IDC_White_Paper_on_Information_O verload.pdf 16
  • Information Overload Reported on: 25-03-2010 athandz Contd. Section 2 – Information Clutter Article 8 - Workers Struggle with Data Overload Key Facts  Information overload is pushing workers to the brink and cutting into workplace productivity, a recent survey by LexisNexis shows.  The survey, which polled 650 employees in a variety of industries, found 68 percent of respondents wished they could spend less time organizing information and more time using it. Another 85 percent said not finding the right information at the right time was a significant time waster, while 62 percent said they spent a lot of time sifting through useless information.  In an 8.89-hour average workday, employees said they spent 7.89 hours conducting research, attending meetings and searching for documents, the survey found.  Mike Walsh, CEO of LexisNexis Legal Markets, said the results should encourage businesses to invest in more efficient research technology and tools.  ―Companies that take action on this issue will realize higher employee productivity and satisfaction,‖ Walsh said in a statement. Source Date March 19, 2008/ December 2007 Source http://www.business-opportunities.biz/2008/03/19/workers-struggle-with-data- overload/ http://www.lexisnexis.com/literature/pdfs/LexisNexis_Workplace_Productivity_Surve y_2_20_08.pdf 17
  • Information Overload Reported on: 25-03-2010 athandz Contd. Section 2 – Information Clutter Article 9 - How to Dig Out From the Information Avalanche Key Facts  Seven out of 10 office workers in the United States feel overwhelmed by information in the workplace, and more than two in five say they are headed for a data “breaking point,” according to a recently released Workplace Productivity Survey, commissioned by LexisNexis — a provider of business information solutions. Here’s a breakdown of the findings: - 62 percent of professionals report that they spend a lot of time sifting through irrelevant information to find what they need; 68 percent wish they could spend less time organizing information and more time using the information that comes their way. - Workers admit that not being able to lay their hands on the right information at the right time impedes their ability to work efficiently; 85 percent agree that not being able to access the right information at the right time is a huge time-waster. - More than 40 percent of the survey participants indicate an inability to handle future increases in information flow. - While an average workday for white-collar workers is 8.89 hours, the survey finds that on average, 7.89 working hours are used conducting research, attending meetings, and searching for previously created documents. - White-collar professionals spend an average of 2.3 hours daily conducting online research, with one in 10 spending four hours or more on an average day. Source Date March 16, 2008 Source http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/23636252/ 18
  • Information Overload Reported on: 25-03-2010 athandz Contd. Section 2 – Information Clutter Article 10 - Mindjet’s Value of an Hour Survey Reports Continued - Dramatic Results Key Facts Mindjet’s global productivity survey of 2,000 knowledge workers has identified key areas where information overload impacts performance and has calculated that individuals can increase productivity by at least 3-5 hours per week, depending on their organisational role and the time they spend on business activities. Conservative estimates by IDC suggest that an organisation with 1,000 employees wastes at least $2.5 million per year by failing to find existing information, searching for outdated information, or recreating information that is outdated and poorly designed. The opportunity costs are even greater, exceeding $15million annually. Highlights of the average number of hours spent globally per week by knowledge workers on the four main business activities include: 9.00 hours a week is spent on preparing, running and summarising actions for meetings while 6.78 hours are spent managing and consolidating information such as documents, emails and web research. For communication and collaboration such as building power point presentations, writing documents with others and communicating the results to colleagues takes 5.74 hours per week. Finally, 10.70 hours is spent on project and task management. European results show that the knowledge worker in the UK is slightly more efficient than the rest of Europe in managing meeting effectiveness, spending 7.83 hours per week as opposed to 9.55 hours in Germany. However, the UK comes last in information management, spending 7.08 hours per week, with France spending 6.69 and Germany 5.91 hours. For communication and collaboration, the UK with 5.38 hours does slightly better than France’s 5.70 hours and worse than Germany’s 4.72 hours. When it comes to project management, Germany is supremely efficient spending 9.15 hours per week against the UK at 11.16 hours and France at 11.33 hours. Source Date February 26, 2008 Source http://www.realwire.com/release_detail.asp?ReleaseID=7900 19
  • Information Overload Reported on: 25-03-2010 athandz Contd. Section 2 – Information Clutter Article 11 - Mindjet’s Value of an Hour Survey - Average Hours Spent Each Week on Information Management Related Activities Key Facts Mindjet’s global productivity survey has reported that over six-and-a-half hours on average is spent each week on information-management related activities: Source Date February 26, 2008 Source http://www.mindjet.com/pdf/us/wp_successInformationEconomy.pdf 20
  • Information Overload Reported on: 25-03-2010 athandz Contd. Section 2 – Information Clutter Article 12 - Mindjet’s Value of an Hour Survey - Information Overload Impacts Performance Key Facts Based on Mindjet’s global productivity survey of 1,800 knowledge workers, we identified key areas where information overload impacts performance. Source Date February 26, 2008 Source http://www.mindjet.com/pdf/us/wp_successInformationEconomy.pdf 21
  • Information Overload Reported on: 25-03-2010 athandz Section 3 – How Information Overload Affects Employers Article 1 - How Does Information Overload Affect Company Earnings? Information overload can have a devastating effect on company earnings, and the danger is even more detrimental if it goes unrecognized. A company comprised of overloaded individuals is going to experience high turnover, low job satisfaction, missed financial forecasts, unproductive meetings, high error rates in work products, operation at a frantic pace, and high levels of rework. A recent study published in Harvard Business Review found that the average worker today spends 40% of the work day merely processing information. This translates into only 60% of the average work day being spent on true value creation activities. 40% of the payroll costs are spent handling the overload. The more time spent on processing information and not creating value, the less a company earns. Source: http://speedwithpurpose.com/overload.aspx Article 2 - Tech Giants Tackle Information Overload A large corporation in the tech industry has tens or hundreds of thousands of people, and if they lose 28 percent of their time to distraction, that's 28 percent of their time at full pay that they aren't producing any value for the employer. The corporations have to think about that, too. Companies also have to think about balancing their employees' lives. Information overload outside of work, like using a BlackBerry on weekends or vacations, could hinder the work-life balance, leading to decreased worker satisfaction. Zeldes also points out the problem is not just affecting technology companies or large corporations. Source Date: July 18, 2008 Source: http://news.cnet.com/8301-1001_3-9993917-92.html 22
  • Information Overload Reported on: 25-03-2010 athandz Contd. Section 1 – Information Overload Article 3 - How Supervisors can influence workforce productivity Key Facts  The ways in which supervisors spend their time influences their own productivity and that of their workers.  Every 1 point increase in the amount of time a supervisor spends actively supervising his or her employees translates into an increase in the amount of time workers spend on productive activities of 0.2 points.  The analysis also found that for every 1 point reduction in the amount of supervisors’ available time, worker unproductive time falls by 0.1 percentage points.  Manager’s report spending an average of 42% of their time on administrative tasks.  The administrative overload is greatest in Spain and the United Kingdom. Source Date 2008 Source http://www.alexanderproudfoot.com/WorkArea//DownloadAsset.aspx?id=254 23
  • Information Overload Reported on: 25-03-2010 athandz Section 4 - Data Traffic Article 1 - Data Traffic Growing Faster Than Revenues  Growing problem of mobile data consumption vs. revenue: perhaps 100X growth of aggregate data vs. 2X growth of revenue (in the next 5 years)  The rapid growth of data consumption is real, has been observed by many operators.  This growth has been driven by many factors, including flat-rate and modestly-priced data plans. Rapid Increment of Data Traffic Source Date: February 26, 2009 Source: http://imcellular.org/2009/02/26/problem-data-traffic-growing-faster-than-revenues/ 24
  • Information Overload Reported on: 25-03-2010 athandz Contd. Section 4 – Data Traffic Article 2 - Why Is Data Consumption Rapidly Increasing?  More Subscribers on Mobile Internet Data Plans - Developed markets will easily see 40% of subscribers on a data plan by 2012, most on a ―Flat Rate‖ plan that encourages use (without a penalty of incremental cost for incremental use) - This trend is so strong that mobile Internet subscribers are expected to outnumber fixed Internet subscribers in 2011.  More Capable Internet Devices - IPhone has redefined how subscribers can use the mobile Internet, and established that the masses can and will browse, use Location-Based Services, watch YouTube video, download and install applications, and more. - By 2011, 30% of the handsets sold in developed markets will be smartphones.  More Services Used - End Users are consuming more services as a result of better devices and a wider variety of applications. Example, Apple’s App Store, has defined a model of data services on demand that is widely appealing, with 500 M downloads in less than a year of operation, establishing that there is a large market for data services. 25
  • Information Overload Reported on: 25-03-2010 athandz Contd. Section 4 – Data Traffic Source Date: February 26, 2009 Source: http://imcellular.org/2009/02/26/problem-data-traffic-growing-faster-than-revenues/ 26
  • Information Overload Reported on: 25-03-2010 athandz Section 5 - Information Consumption 5.1 U.S Information Consumption  Americans spend a huge amount of time at home receiving information, an average of 11.8 hours per day.  Bytes of information consumed by U.S. individuals have grown at 5.4 percent annually since 1980, far less than the growth rate of computer and information technology performance.  Roughly 3.6 zettabytes (or 3,600 exabytes) of information were consumed in American homes in 2008.  Americans spend 41 percent of our information time watching television, but TV accounts for less than 35 percent of information bytes consumed.  Computer and video games account for 55 percent of all information bytes consumed in the home, because modern game consoles and PCs create huge streams of graphics.  The average American consumes 34 GB worth of content a day, including a whopping 100,000 words of information.  The report clarifies that we don’t necessarily parse a full 100,000 words per day, but that rather astounding figure does cross our eyes and ears each 24-hour interval via multiple channels: the Web, TV, text messaging, radio, video games and more.  The big winner is still television at almost 45 percent of our daily allowance, but the computer is a not-too-distant second at about 27 percent.  In all, we spend about 11.8 hours per day absorbing mass quantities of information, sometimes multitasking in front of multiple screens simultaneously. Hourly Information Consumption 27
  • Information Overload Reported on: 25-03-2010 athandz Contd. Section 5 – Information Consumption Consumption of Words Information Consumption in Compressed Bytes Source Date: December 09, 2009 Source: http://mashable.com/2009/12/09/american-data-diet/ http://hmi.ucsd.edu/pdf/HMI_2009_ConsumerReport_Dec9_2009.pdf 28
  • Information Overload Reported on: 25-03-2010 athandz Contd. Section 5– Information Consumption 5.2 Metadata Article 1 - The Metadata Problem Key Facts  In 2008, non-textual media storage requirements (audio, music, images, and video) were an estimated 16 exabytes. (An exabyte is a billion Gbytes.)  Subscription-based and download media sales totaled $3.3 billion in 2008  British independent TV network broadcaster ITN adds more than 20 hours of broadcast-quality video to its archives every day, and it’s just one of hundreds of global broadcasters doing so.  Web 2.0 users add 20 hours of video to YouTube’s archives every minute.  Currently, none of this media is easily searchable.  Video in particular is hard to search because most of the material is not indexed in a searchable way. Source Date January 21, 2010 Source http://www.edn.com/blog/980000298/post/1780052178.html 29
  • Information Overload Reported on: 25-03-2010 athandz Contd. Section 5– Information Consumption 5.3 Data Superabundance Article 1 - Enterprise Data Growth Key Facts  Enterprise Data Growth in the next 5 years is estimated to be 650%  80% of this data will be unstructured data  40 exabytes* of unstructured new information will be generated worldwide in 2009  The estimated average storage capacity growth in Australia in 2009 is 60%… in 2010 they estimate it will be 62% Source Date November 16, 2009 Source http://blog.une.edu.au/robbi/2009/11/16/enterprise-data-growth/ Article 2 - Attacking the Growth Barrier of Data Storage Key Facts  IDC estimated the amount of data stored worldwide in 2007 was nearly 300 exabytes, and that this number will grow ten-fold by 2011.  The data storage, archive, and backup of large volumes of digital content is quickly creating demands for multi-petabyte storage systems (equal to thousands of terabytes or millions of gigabytes), but today’s storage industry -- and its technological approach -- is not set up to effectively meet this demand.  The beauty of dispersal is that as storage increases, the cost per unit of storage does not. Dispersal also meets the same reliability target.  The table below best illustrates a generic example of cost savings between dispersal and replication when fixing the cost at a representative, but not necessarily actual, ―raw” storage cost of $2.75 per GB. Source Date September 10, 2009 Source http://www.wwpi.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&catid=99:cov er-story&id=7726:attacking-the-growth-barrier-of-data-storage&Itemid=2701018 30
  • Information Overload Reported on: 25-03-2010 athandz Contd. Section 5– Information Consumption Article 3 - Growth of Stored Data Key Facts  The amount of data stored within corporate servers, workstations and user's machines continues to grow.  The dramatic growth of stored data is fueled by three trends:  Increasing capacity of storage media,  Decreasing costs per MB,  Emerging role of information technology within firms. Source Date N/A Source http://www.deepspar.com/wp-data-loss.html 31
  • Information Overload Reported on: 25-03-2010 athandz Feedback Any feedback on the answer provided would be greatly appreciated by the researcher and athandz team. Want to know more details about our RESEARCH SERVICES? Please contact nadee@athandz.com 32