When Personal & Professional Collide: Ethics in the Social Media Era
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When Personal & Professional Collide: Ethics in the Social Media Era

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John Bethune's slides from May 26, 2011 ASBPE webinar, B2B Ethical Struggles and Solutions in a New-Media Era

John Bethune's slides from May 26, 2011 ASBPE webinar, B2B Ethical Struggles and Solutions in a New-Media Era

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When Personal & Professional Collide: Ethics in the Social Media Era When Personal & Professional Collide: Ethics in the Social Media Era Presentation Transcript

  • WHEN PERSONAL & PROFESSIONAL COLLIDE: ETHICS IN THE SOCIAL MEDIA ERA John Bethune B2BMemes.comWednesday, May 25, 2011
  • “You don’t have to be an emotionless robot, but you need to act like one.” Sports Illustrated Writer Fired for Clapping During Daytona 500, Noah Davis, SportsNewser, March 1, 2011Wednesday, May 25, 2011
  • Traditional journalistic ethics is predicated on firmly separating the personal and private from the professional and public.Wednesday, May 25, 2011
  • But in the social media era, privacy is dying, if not dead.Wednesday, May 25, 2011
  • This is not new. “You have zero privacy anyway. Get over it.” Flickr.com/webmink --Scott McNealy, 1999Wednesday, May 25, 2011
  • Identity & Reputation As a result of our “increasing publicness” of social media, identity and reputation are coming closer and sometimes into conflict. -- Jeff Jarvis, Buzzmachine,com, March 8, 2011Wednesday, May 25, 2011
  • The personal you and the professional you are becoming one and the same.Wednesday, May 25, 2011
  • Ethics in TransitionWednesday, May 25, 2011
  • Ethics in Transition • If you have your own personal social media accounts, what are your responsibilities and risks?Wednesday, May 25, 2011
  • Ethics in Transition • If you have your own personal social media accounts, what are your responsibilities and risks? • Do the companies we work for need social media policies?Wednesday, May 25, 2011
  • Ethics in Transition • If you have your own personal social media accounts, what are your responsibilities and risks? • Do the companies we work for need social media policies? • Do editors need their own personal policies?Wednesday, May 25, 2011
  • Ethics in Transition • If you have your own personal social media accounts, what are your responsibilities and risks? • Do the companies we work for need social media policies? • Do editors need their own personal policies? • Is transparency more important than objectivity?Wednesday, May 25, 2011
  • Ethics in Transition • If you have your own personal social media accounts, what are your responsibilities and risks? • Do the companies we work for need social media policies? • Do editors need their own personal policies? • Is transparency more important than objectivity? • Is real-time, process journalism inherently more personal?Wednesday, May 25, 2011
  • Can Social Media Get You Fired? “I had been wanting to start a blog for some time, but I fretted about . . . all those stories on the news about people who got fired for writing things on their blogs.” --Steven Roll 2010Wednesday, May 25, 2011
  • Dooced –verb (internet, slang) Dismissed from ones job as a result of ones actions on the Internet. Heather Armstrong, fired in 2002 for comments she made on her personal website, dooce.comWednesday, May 25, 2011
  • Could it happen to you?Wednesday, May 25, 2011
  • Could it happen to you? CNN Producer Says He Was Fired for BloggingWednesday, May 25, 2011
  • Could it happen to you? CNN Producer Says He Was Fired for Blogging Post Editor Ends Tweets as New Guidelines Are IssuedWednesday, May 25, 2011
  • Could it happen to you? CNN Producer Says He Was Fired for Blogging Post Editor Ends Tweets as New Guidelines Are Issued CNN Fires Octavia Nasr over tweet praising late ayatollahWednesday, May 25, 2011
  • Could it happen to you? CNN Producer Says He Was Fired for Blogging Post Editor Ends Tweets as New Guidelines Are Issued CNN Fires Octavia Nasr over tweet praising late ayatollah AP Reporter Reprimanded For Facebook PostWednesday, May 25, 2011
  • Is the answer a corporate social media policy?Wednesday, May 25, 2011
  • Is the answer a corporate social media policy? Or will it just make things worse?Wednesday, May 25, 2011
  • Reuters gets it right . . . “The distinction between the private and the professional has largely broken down online and you should assume that your professional and personal social media activity will be treated as one no matter how hard you try to keep them separate.”Wednesday, May 25, 2011
  • . . . and wrong “The advent of social media does not change your relationship with the company that employs you”Wednesday, May 25, 2011
  • The Reality: The advent of social media doesn’t just change your relationship with your employer - it transforms that relationship.Wednesday, May 25, 2011
  • Associated Press Q: Why does the AP care or think it should have a say in what I put on my social networking feed/page? A: We all have a stake in upholding the AP’s reputation for fairness and impartiality, which has been one of our chief assets for more than 160 years.Wednesday, May 25, 2011
  • News Media Guild “Parts of the [AP] policy seem to be snuffing out peoples’ First Amendment rights of expression by a company that wraps itself in the First Amendment.” --Tony Winton, Guild presidentWednesday, May 25, 2011
  • Michael Hyatt, CEO, Thomas Nelson: 5 Arguments Against Social Media PoliciesWednesday, May 25, 2011
  • Michael Hyatt, CEO, Thomas Nelson: 5 Arguments Against Social Media Policies 1. Your people can be trusted.Wednesday, May 25, 2011
  • Michael Hyatt, CEO, Thomas Nelson: 5 Arguments Against Social Media Policies 1. Your people can be trusted. 2. Social media are just one more way to communicate.Wednesday, May 25, 2011
  • Michael Hyatt, CEO, Thomas Nelson: 5 Arguments Against Social Media Policies 1. Your people can be trusted. 2. Social media are just one more way to communicate. 3. More rules only make your company more bureaucratic.Wednesday, May 25, 2011
  • Michael Hyatt, CEO, Thomas Nelson: 5 Arguments Against Social Media Policies 1. Your people can be trusted. 2. Social media are just one more way to communicate. 3. More rules only make your company more bureaucratic. 4. Formal policies only discourage people from participating.Wednesday, May 25, 2011
  • Michael Hyatt, CEO, Thomas Nelson: 5 Arguments Against Social Media Policies 1. Your people can be trusted. 2. Social media are just one more way to communicate. 3. More rules only make your company more bureaucratic. 4. Formal policies only discourage people from participating. 5. You probably already have policies that govern behavior.Wednesday, May 25, 2011
  • Journal Register CEO John Paton’s Three Simple Rules for Using Social MediaWednesday, May 25, 2011
  • Journal Register CEO John Paton’s Three Simple Rules for Using Social Media 1.Wednesday, May 25, 2011
  • Journal Register CEO John Paton’s Three Simple Rules for Using Social Media 1. 2.Wednesday, May 25, 2011
  • Journal Register CEO John Paton’s Three Simple Rules for Using Social Media 1. 2. 3.Wednesday, May 25, 2011
  • Do you need a personal social media policy?Wednesday, May 25, 2011
  • Do you need a personal social media policy? • Will you avoid covering the same area as your employer?Wednesday, May 25, 2011
  • Do you need a personal social media policy? • Will you avoid covering the same area as your employer? • Will you tell your employer about your social media activity?Wednesday, May 25, 2011
  • Do you need a personal social media policy? • Will you avoid covering the same area as your employer? • Will you tell your employer about your social media activity? • Will you discuss your work on your personal accounts?Wednesday, May 25, 2011
  • Do you need a personal social media policy? • Will you avoid covering the same area as your employer? • Will you tell your employer about your social media activity? • Will you discuss your work on your personal accounts? • Will you engage in your social media while at work?Wednesday, May 25, 2011
  • Transparency When privacy is dead, transparency becomes more important than objectivityWednesday, May 25, 2011
  • Sometimes transparency isn’t too personal. . .Wednesday, May 25, 2011
  • And sometimes it gets very personalWednesday, May 25, 2011
  • Social Media: A Different Ethical Standard? “This disclosure and the interactive nature of blogging [make the conflict of interest acceptable]. . . . While some may raise objections, Dow Jones feels the transparency will give readers a chance to judge my work on its merits.”Wednesday, May 25, 2011
  • Is Transparency Alone Enough?Wednesday, May 25, 2011
  • Two Views of Transparency . . . Pro Henry Blodgett, Business Insider: “Our policy is to take these opportunities case-by- case. If we think travel or an event partially paid for by a company will help us produce content that our readers love, we’ll be happy to consider it. If we think it will lead to us producing crap or fluff or be a waste of time, we won’t do it.”Wednesday, May 25, 2011
  • Two Views of Transparency . . . and Con Felix Salmon, Reuters: “Failure to disclose freebies like this is very bad; disclosing them, however, isn’t much better. So the best solution is to simply refuse to take them.”Wednesday, May 25, 2011
  • THE ETHICS OF REAL-TIME JOURNALISMWednesday, May 25, 2011
  • Haskell Wexler, Medium Cool (1969) In traditional journalism, reporters stand apart from their personal selves and are uninvolved in what they report on.Wednesday, May 25, 2011
  • In real-time journalism, the observer often becomes a participant Paid Content 2011 conference. Photo and tweet by Rex Hammock (@r)Wednesday, May 25, 2011
  • Is Liveblogging Journalism? The Guardian’s live blog combined wire service reports, tweets, YouTube and livestream video, and other sources. Not everyone liked it.Wednesday, May 25, 2011
  • Liveblogging Criticism “There is no structure and therefore no sense, and the effect is of being in the middle of a room full of loud, shouty and excitable people all yelling at once with all the phones ringing, the fire alarm going off and a drunken old boy slurring in your ear about ‘what it all means.’ ” --John SymesWednesday, May 25, 2011
  • Liveblogging Praise “The liveblog isnt meant to be read when its finished. Its meant to be read while its happening. . . . It is a product of the process-driven mindset . . . It is, as the very name suggests, a live thing.” --Adam TinworthWednesday, May 25, 2011
  • Process Journalism: Paying Attention to the Man Behind the CurtainWednesday, May 25, 2011
  • Jeff Jarvis on Process Journalism “Online, the story, the reporting, the knowledge are never done and never perfect. “That doesn’t mean that we revel in imperfection . . . [or] that we have no standards. “It just means that we do journalism differently.”Wednesday, May 25, 2011
  • Process-Journalism Standards • Collaboration • Transparency • Letting readers into the process • Saying what we don’t knowWednesday, May 25, 2011
  • Personal or Professional? The best solution is to be yourself. If that makes you uneasy, talk with your shrink. Better yet, blog about it. -- Jeff Jarvis, BuzzMachine.com, March 8. 2011Wednesday, May 25, 2011
  • Thank You! John Bethune John.Bethune@B2BMemes.comWednesday, May 25, 2011