Babe theory of revolution

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The babe theory of political movements essentially holds that:

Where and when there are hot babes, an exponential number of men will show up. If 100 cute girls with voluptuous bodies are protesting for freedom, you can count on a thousand men being there as well.

If sexy babes are involved in a peaceful political movement, it has a far greater chance of succeeding. If there are no good-looking women involved, the odds of a successful (and peaceful) movement fall dramatically.

http://blog.oneworld.am/2008/02/24/babe-theory-of-political-movements/

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  • The Cedar Revolution (Arabic: ثورة الأرز - thawrat al-arz) or Independence Intifada[1] (Arabic: إنتفاضة الإستقلال-intifāḍat al-istiqlāl) was a chain of demonstrations in Lebanon (especially in the capital Beirut) triggered by theassassination of the former Lebanese Prime Minister Rafik Hariri on February 14, 2005. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cedar_Revolution
  • Babe theory of revolution

    1. 1. Babe Theory of Revolution<br />
    2. 2. A bit of theory…<br />The babe theory of political movements essentially holds that:<br />Where and when there are hot babes, an exponential number of men will show up. If 100 cute girls with voluptuous bodies are protesting for freedom, you can count on a thousand men being there as well.<br />If sexy babes are involved in a peaceful political movement, it has a far greater chance of succeeding. If there are no good-looking women involved, the odds of a successful (and peaceful) movement fall dramatically.<br />Where and when alluring women are excluded from demonstrations, you can expect greater chances of strife, rioting, and failure.<br />From The Caucasia Knot – http://blog.oneworld.am<br />
    3. 3. Origins of Babe Theory<br />The Babe Theory, first described by P.J. O'Rourke in his Parliament of Whores book:<br />"Best of all, there were hardly any beautiful women at the [Housing Now!] rally. I saw a journalist friend of mine in the Mall, and he and I purused this line of inquiry as assiduously as our happy private lives allow. Practically every female at the march was a bowser. "We're not being sexist here," my friend insisted. "It's not that looks matter per se. It's just that beautiful women are always on the cutting edge of social trends. Remember how many beautiful women were in the anti-war movement twenty years ago? In the yoga classes fifteen years ago? At the discos ten years ago? On Wall Street five years ago? Where the beautiful women are is where the country is headed," said my friend. "And this," he looked around him, "isn't it."Look for the babes, and that's where the social action is, that's where the success will be.<br />
    4. 4. Origins of Statue of Liberty<br />In 1830, French artist Eugène Delacroix painted an image that endures today in the hearts and minds of freedom-lovers everywhere, an image of a bare-breasted woman in all her glory, representative of the greater concept of liberty, leading the charge in an epic revolutionary battle (thanks to Frank Warner).<br />Most art historians believe that the image of the woman is strictly symbolic, but could it be that Delacroix had a particular woman in mind when he painted Liberty?<br />The values Liberty embodies are so universal, that when both men and women see her resemblance in modern times, we cannot help but connect the dots psychologically, deep down in our very souls. One of America's most enduring symbols of liberty is New York harbor's Statue of Liberty.<br />
    5. 5. The French Revolution of 1830<br />
    6. 6. Lebanon’s Cedar Revolution<br />
    7. 7. Lebanon’s Cedar Revolution<br />
    8. 8. Georgia’s Rose Revolution<br />
    9. 9. Ukraine’s Orange Revolution<br />
    10. 10. Ukraine’s Orange Revolution<br />
    11. 11. Tunisia’s Jasmine Revolution<br />
    12. 12. Tunisia’s Jasmine Revolution<br />
    13. 13. Egypt’s [@flower] revolution?<br />
    14. 14. Egypt’s [@flower] revolution?<br />

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