Concept Schools Turning Students Into Leaders

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Concept Schools Turning Students Into Leaders

  1. 1. Turning Students Into Leaders 2009 Annual Concept Schools Conference
  2. 2. QUESTION: Are leaders born or made?
  3. 3. the top 10 skills Future Leaders (Your Current Students) Will Need To Possess
  4. 4. 10. Taking risks.
  5. 5. Robert Galvin “Leadership is going first in a new direction—and being followed.”
  6. 6. “Why won’t my employees take any initiative?” Common Issue
  7. 7. Helicopter Parents
  8. 8. Why are manhole covers round?
  9. 9. 9. Failing
  10. 10. If you are not failing, you are probably not taking enough risks.
  11. 11. Individuals who take failures personally have an exaggerated sense of their own incompetence. They view taking initiative as futile since they expect to fail.
  12. 12. celebrate failure
  13. 13. “Say what?”
  14. 14. Celebrations provide people with a safe forum for them to acknowledge their failures, making the analysis of what went wrong less threatening.
  15. 15. “We have a culture that allows people to say, ‘It was my fault and here’s what I’ll do differently next time.’” Michelle Peluso, CEO of Travelocity
  16. 16. 8. Speaking multiple languages
  17. 17. thx for the iview! i wud to work 4 u!! :)
  18. 18. Silent Generation 1925 - 1945 Baby Boomers 1946 - 1964 Generation X 1965 - 1980 Generation Y 1981 - 2000
  19. 19. One out of four human resource professionals report witnessing intergenerational conflicts among workers. Source: Society for Human Resource Management
  20. 20. Two-thirds of Generation Yers say they have little or no weekly interaction with members of the Silent Generation at work. Source: Randstad, 2008 World of Work Survey
  21. 21. 7. Working in spurts
  22. 22. workfragmentation
  23. 23. The average length of time 11min. 4 sec. we work on a task before being interrupted SOURCE: Gloria Mark, Victor M. Gonzalez, & Justin Harris “No Task Left Behind? Examining the Nature of Fragmented Work”
  24. 24. On average, it takes more than 25 minutes to resume what we were doing before being interrupted. SOURCE: Gloria Mark, Victor M. Gonzalez, & Justin Harris “No Task Left Behind? Examining the Nature of Fragmented Work”
  25. 25. “Engaging in multiple activities appears to be related to the scope of work; as the scope increases so does multi-tasking.” Mark, Gonzalez, and Harris
  26. 26. Managers experience 50 percent more external interruptions than their employees do. Mark, Gonzalez, and Harris
  27. 27. 6. Sharing knowledge.
  28. 28. Wally who?
  29. 29. Giving away our authority is a personal challenge. It involves sharing influence, prestige, and applause, while forcing us to deal with our personal insecurities.
  30. 30. “ A basic function of leadership is to produce more leaders, not more ”Nader followers. Ralph
  31. 31. 5. Pursuing mastery.
  32. 32. “The class of 2007 is the first in Ohio which must pass all five Ohio Graduation Test sections to receive a diploma.” The Blade, May 22, 2007
  33. 33. When we force people to strive for proficiency in everything, we miss the opportunity for them to achieve greatness in the one area where they may, indeed, achieve just that.
  34. 34. strivingforimprovement, most of us do the same thing: we take our strengths for granted, and concentrate all our efforts on conquering our weaknesses
  35. 35. Not surprisingly, the vast majority of organizations appear to believe that the best way for individuals to grow is to eliminate their weaknesses.
  36. 36. Identifying each person’s strongest talents permits everyone the opportunity to contribute what they do BEST.
  37. 37. 4. Seeing the Cathedral
  38. 38. Old story: Two stonemasons are working on the same project. An observer asks, “What are you doing?” The first stonemason replies: “I’m cutting stone.” The second stonemason replies: “I’m building a great cathedral.”
  39. 39. “The biggest men and women with the biggest ideas can be shot down by the smallest men and women with the smallest minds. Think big anyway.” Dr. Kent M. Keith Anyway: The Paradoxical Commandments
  40. 40. We often describe children as having wild or active imaginations. The best leaders never outgrow their imaginative gift.
  41. 41. Defy the verdict!
  42. 42. “The illiterate of the 21st century will not be those who cannot read and write, but those who cannot learn, unlearn, and relearn.” Alvin Toffler
  43. 43. TWO: Resolving conflict.
  44. 44. con .flict (kón flikt) a disagreement in which those involved perceive a threat to their needs, interests, or happiness.
  45. 45. Conflicts are natural occurrences within the workplace, so clashes and disagreements are predictable.
  46. 46. Eric and Rhonda are in the kitchen. There is only one orange left and both of them want it. What’s the best solution?
  47. 47. “Seek First to Understand, Then to Be Understood” -Stephen Covey
  48. 48. # 1 Proving credibility.
  49. 49. 49 PERCENT Less than half of all U.S. employees trust their senior leaders. Source: Watson Wyatt’s WorkUSA 2006/2007 Survey
  50. 50. “In corporate America, crime pays. Handsomely. Grotesquely, even.” Arianna Huffington Pigs at the Trough
  51. 51. “ WHAT WE FOUND IN OUR INVESTIGATION OF ADMIRED LEADERSHIP KOUZES & POSNER QUALITIES IS THAT MORE The Leadership Challenge THAN ANYTHING, PEOPLE WANT TO FOLLOW LEADERS WHO ARE CREDIBLE.”
  52. 52. “Credibility is the foundation on which leaders and constituents will build the grand dreams of the future.” Kouzes & Posner
  53. 53. DWYSYWD
  54. 54. Grow some of your own!
  55. 55. Turning Students Into Leaders 2009 Annual Concept Schools Conference

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