Concept Schools Leading from the Heart

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Concept Schools Leading from the Heart

  1. 1. The Leading from the Heart Workshop® 2009 Annual Concept Schools Conference
  2. 2. “Employees are assets with feet.” Press Release, Walker Information
  3. 3. About half of Human Resource professionals say they are seeing new workers entering the workforce lacking overall professionalism, written communication skills, analytical skills, or business knowledge. SHRM: 2005 Future of the U.S. Labor Pool Survey Report
  4. 4. By 2012, one out of five workers will be fifty-five years old or older. Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics
  5. 5. “Why Retention Should Become a Core Strategy Now” Harvard Management Update, October 2003
  6. 6. “It may be time to reconsider the ‘they have no place else to go’ strategy of employee retention.” “Why Retention Should Become a Core Strategy Now” Harvard Management Update, October 2003
  7. 7. values-based LEADERSHIP
  8. 8. Values-based leaders enlist employees by identifying common interests and showing them how that shared vision will satisfy mutual needs.
  9. 9. 49 PERCENT Less than half of all U.S. employees trust their senior leaders. Source: Watson Wyatt’s WorkUSA 2006/2007 Survey
  10. 10. People join an organization. They leave a manager.
  11. 11. Forget reality. Perception drives behavior.
  12. 12. “ WHAT WE FOUND IN OUR INVESTIGATION OF ADMIRED LEADERSHIP KOUZES & POSNER QUALITIES IS THAT MORE The Leadership Challenge THAN ANYTHING, PEOPLE WANT TO FOLLOW LEADERS WHO ARE CREDIBLE.”
  13. 13. !  !  !  !  !  ! 
  14. 14. values-based leaders: 1 Accept Challenges and Take Risks Risk seeking separates values-based leaders from the yesteryear-theory bureaucrats who sit around supervising the work. Why is that important? Leadership is proactive, as people can only follow leaders who are moving.
  15. 15. risk Verb: To do something despite danger; to incur the chance of harm or loss by taking an action.
  16. 16. Risk Takers Some people respond to challenges that are presented… Risk Seekers …while others seek out opportunities to lead.
  17. 17. First, we weigh our chances of success. Next, we measure the importance of success. We also gauge how much control we have in the outcome. How we We assess our own skill. assess risk A values-based assessment should determines override all other assessments of risk. how we That is: does taking this risk demonstrate your adherence to the take risk. organization’s values, or not?
  18. 18. Leaders prefer asking for forgiveness rather than begging for permission.
  19. 19. “Each day brings you opportunities to raise important questions, speak to higher values, and surface unresolved conflicts. Every day you have the chance to make a difference in the lives of people around you.” Ronald Heifetz, Leadership on the Line
  20. 20. Risk Seeker
  21. 21. values-based leaders: 2 Master Both Listening and Speaking The way we communicate with our employees impacts how workers understand our messages, and what actions, if any, they take in response.
  22. 22. “ The biggest problem with leadership communication is ” the that it has occurred. —Boyd Clarke and Ron Crossland, The Leader’s Voice
  23. 23. Jargon Jargon
  24. 24. J A R G O N
  25. 25. Industrial phrases, buzzwords, and acronyms are used as verbal shorthand to streamline communication among colleagues.
  26. 26. “We need to meet our AMO in order to satisfy NCLB.”
  27. 27. “The ADA for our at-risks is twice as high as for our GATEs.”
  28. 28. “We’re using integrated curriculum to meet the benchmark for instructional minutes, but its messing up our PTR.”
  29. 29. “What the…?”
  30. 30. why jargon? Speakers sometimes invoke workplace jargon to impress others, or to establish their membership in an elite faction. Some use jargon to exclude or confuse others, or to mask their own inexperience or lack of knowledge.
  31. 31. JARGON often includes euphemisms used to substitute inoffensive expressions for those considered offensive.
  32. 32. These actions will align our resources with market needs and adjust the size of our infrastructure. – DuPont CEO announcing the elimination of 3,500 jobs
  33. 33. of employees are regularly confused about what their 20 percent colleagues are saying, but are too embarrassed to ask for clarification admitted using jargon deliberately—as a means More than a third of either demonstrating control or gaining credibility found the use of jargon in office meetings both 40 percent irritating and distracting One out of dismissed speakers using jargon as both pretentious and untrustworthy ten Source: Office Angels
  34. 34. A single voice. A candid voice. A genuine voice. Your voice.
  35. 35. values-based leaders: 3 Live By The Values They Profess Now, since the onslaught of corporate scandals, we conceive of business leaders as justice-obstructing, debt- hiding, earnings-overstating thieves who use company funds to purchase personal artwork and to put on lavish birthday parties for family members.
  36. 36. “You will be confronted with questions every day that test your morals. Think carefully, and for your sake, do the right thing, not the easy thing.” - Dennis Kozlowski, speaking to the St. Anselm College Class of 2002
  37. 37. “Ex-Tyco Chief Executive Kozlowski Sentenced to 8 to 25 Years” Headline / Bloomberg.com / 09.19.2005
  38. 38. Strong Fundamental Values “We must demand of ourselves and of each other the highest standards of individual and corporate integrity. We safeguard company assets. We comply with all company policies and laws.” Source: The Tyco Guide to Ethical Conduct
  39. 39. “We safeguard company assets.” Regency mahogany bookcase, c. 1810, $105,000 George I walnut arabesque tallcase clock, $113,750 Custom queen bed skirt, $4,995 Custom pillow, $2,665 Ascherberg grand piano, c. 1895, $77,000 Chandelier, Painted Iron, c. 1930, $32,500 Pair of Italian armchairs, c. 1780, $64,278 Persian rug, 20 feet by 14 feet, $191,250
  40. 40. “We’ve got this idea that business means anything goes. ” R. Edward Freeman, Director Olsson Center for Applied Ethics
  41. 41. Used-car salesperson…slick Politician…dishonest Personal injury lawyer…greedy Insurance agent…pesky Postal worker…postal
  42. 42. Business leader…fraud
  43. 43. Consistency between an organization’s stated values and its leaders’ actual behavior is critical to credibility.
  44. 44. alignment Once they feel aligned, individuals can start envisioning their place in supporting the organization’s success.
  45. 45. When there is discrepancy between what leaders say and what they do, employees immediately and rightly recognize those leaders as frauds.
  46. 46. WHY BOTHER? Eighty-two percent of workers would rather earn less money at an organization with ethical business practices than receive higher pay at a company with questionable ethics. LRN Ethics Study 2006
  47. 47. Employees are searching for leaders with integrity who prove their credibility continuously.
  48. 48. Prove yours!
  49. 49. values-based leaders: 4 Freely Give Away Their Authority Why the emphasis on giving away authority? Giving authority to others demonstrates trust in people. Trusted employees are more effective, creative, and satisfied. And a funny thing happens when you trust people—they trust you back!
  50. 50. “Hierarchy is an organization with its face toward the CEO and its ass toward the customer.” -Kjell A. Nordström and Jonas Ridderstråle Funky Business
  51. 51. Giving away our authority is a personal challenge. It involves sharing influence, prestige, and applause, while forcing us to deal with our personal insecurities.
  52. 52. Once you abandon those concerns, you will recognize empowering others as its own reward.
  53. 53. “But my employees don’t want to be empowered!” Common Rebuttal
  54. 54. Gary Hamel “The bottleneck is at the top of the bottle.”
  55. 55. Micromanaged employees “live down to” the expectations set for them, thereby perfectly conforming to the micromanager’s views of them.
  56. 56. SAT THEM FURTHER AWAY SMILED AT THEM LESS MADE LESS EYE CONTACT WITH THEM CALLED ON THEM LESS CRITICIZED THEM MORE GAVE THEM LESS TIME TO ANSWER QUESTIONS TEACHERS & WITHHELD PRAISE FOR SUCCESSFUL ANSWERS MICROMANAGERS PRAISED THEM FOR Researchers studied how teachers MARGINAL ANSWERS behaved toward students for whom DEMANDED LESS WORK they had low expectations. They: FROM THEM
  57. 57. Leaders who consider themselves effective are less apt to micromanage high and more likely to set expectations for their employees.
  58. 58. values-based leaders: 5 Recognize the Best in Others Values-based leaders recognize that each person’s talents are unique and that a person’s best opportunity for growth is in exploiting those strengths.
  59. 59. What prevents our employees from doing what they do best? Usually, our emphasis on what they do worst.
  60. 60. Gallup survey question: ! Strongly Agree “At work do (20 percent) you have the opportunity to do what you do best every day?”
  61. 61. ! Strongly Agree 38 percent more likely to work in business units with higher productivity 50 percent more likely to work in business units with lower turnover 44 percent more likely to work in business units with high customer satisfaction scores Source: Now, Discover Your Strengths Marcus Buckingham and Donald Clifton
  62. 62. When we force our employees to strive for proficiency in everything, we miss the opportunity for them to achieve greatness or mastery in something— in the one area where they may, indeed, achieve just that.
  63. 63. Identifying each person’s strongest talents permits everyone the opportunity to contribute what they do BEST.
  64. 64. jeff bezos@amazon.com “I’d rather interview 50 people and not hire anyone than hire the wrong person.”
  65. 65. values-based leaders: 6 Have a Vision and Convince Others To Share it We often describe children as having wild or active imaginations. The best leaders never outgrow their imaginative gift.
  66. 66. “The age-old secret to generating buy-in is to strategically design, target, and deliver a story that projects a positive future.” Mark S. Walton Generating Buy-In: Mastering the Language of Leadership
  67. 67. Good leaders have a vision. They hold in Have a their minds pictures of Vision what is possible.
  68. 68. Great leaders convince Convince others to share Others to their vision by articulating it in Share It memorable and inspirational ways.
  69. 69. Old story: Two stonemasons are working on the same project. An observer asks, “What are you doing?” The first stonemason replies: “I’m cutting stone.” The second stonemason replies: “I’m building a great cathedral.”
  70. 70. “If you want to build a ship, don’t drum up people to collect wood and don’t assign them tasks and work, but rather teach them to long for the endless immensity of the sea.”
  71. 71. Churchill “Before you can inspire with emotion, you must be swamped with it yourself. Before you can move their tears, your own must flow. To convince them, you must yourself believe.”
  72. 72. I N S P I R E
  73. 73. vital SIX integrities !  Accept challenges and take risks !  Master both listening and speaking !  Live by the values they profess !  Freely give away their authority !  Recognize the best in others !  Have a vision and convince others to share it values-based leadership
  74. 74. leadership is a craft, with the best practitioners guided by their values
  75. 75. The Leading from the Heart Workshop® 2009 Annual Concept Schools Conference

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