A New Mode of Scholarship: Digital Humanities, the Library, and the Collaboratory

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A presentation given by the Digital Humanities Collective, at QuasiCon 2014 (held at the University of Michigan School of Information).

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A New Mode of Scholarship: Digital Humanities, the Library, and the Collaboratory

  1. 1. A New Mode of Scholarship: Digital Humanities, the Library, and the Collaboratory Steven Hoelscher / Alix Keener / Setsuko Yokoyama @DH_Collective QuasiCon 2014 This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License.
  2. 2. DIGITAL HUMANITIES: ➊ Using digital tools and methods to do traditional humanities research ➋ Analyzing new digital technologies using traditional humanities modes of inquiry @DH_Collective QuasiCon 2014
  3. 3. LISA SPIRO: ✪ Provide wide access to cultural information ✪ Enable manipulation of that data ✪ Transform scholarly communication ✪ Enhance teaching and learning ✪ Make a public impact @DH_Collective QuasiCon 2014
  4. 4. “Using the Digital to Read Literary Texts in Context” @DH_Collective QuasiCon 2014
  5. 5. “COLLABORATORY” @DH_Collective QuasiCon 2014
  6. 6. DATA-CENTRIC VIRTUAL SPACES TO FACILITATE COMMUNICATION & DISTRIBUTION OF INFORMATION @DH_Collective QuasiCon 2014
  7. 7. COUNCIL ON LIBRARY AND INFORMATION RESOURCES’ FOUR EXPERTISES: ➊ ➋ ➌ ➍ DOMAIN PROJECT MANAGEMENT DATA MANAGEMENT ANALYTICAL @DH_Collective QuasiCon 2014
  8. 8. COLLABORATORIES REQUIRE: ➊ COMMUNICATION ➋ DOCUMENTATION ➌ USER-CENTERED DESIGN @DH_Collective QuasiCon 2014
  9. 9. ➊ COMMUNICATION 79 Main Themes; 108 Secondary Themes @DH_Collective QuasiCon 2014
  10. 10. ➋ DOCUMENTATION Commodities Mentioned: ✪ This includes any commodities mentioned in the text, but only those exhibiting exchange value, which includes cultural or symbolic capital in addition to monetary value. It does not, however, include use value. This section uses the language of the text. ✪ The distinction between use value and exchange value: ✸ “the pretty coat at the ball” has exchange value because it is there representing a cultural sign of wealth or beauty. ✸ “the coat” that is mentioned as being worn in the winter because it is cold has use value. It keeps the wearer warm but does not represent a cultural or exchange value. @DH_Collective QuasiCon 2014
  11. 11. ➌ USER-CENTERED DESIGN RAPID PROTOTYPING ITERATIVE DESIGN @DH_Collective QuasiCon 2014
  12. 12. ➌ USER-CENTERED DESIGN landofsunshine.org @DH_Collective QuasiCon 2014
  13. 13. “COLLABORATORY” AS A PHYSICAL SPACE TO WONDER IN @DH_Collective QuasiCon 2014
  14. 14. EXPLORATORY NATURE OF DIGITAL HUMANITIES RESEARCH & THE TRADITIONAL FUNCTION OF THE LIBRARY @DH_Collective QuasiCon 2014
  15. 15. @DH_Collective QuasiCon 2014
  16. 16. “We’ll never have the chance to work with programmers who speak the language of the humanities as well as Perl, Python, or PHP.” Mark Sample “On the Death of the Digital Humanities Center” 26 March 2010 @DH_Collective QuasiCon 2014
  17. 17. @DH_Collective QuasiCon 2014
  18. 18. Workshops to Humanize and Sample Tools @DH_Collective QuasiCon 2014
  19. 19. Workshops to Humanize and Sample Tools @DH_Collective QuasiCon 2014
  20. 20. LIBRARY & LIBRARIANS AS: ✪ a facilitator of searching and browsing ✪ the access point to the tools @DH_Collective QuasiCon 2014
  21. 21. BEYOND DIGITIZATION: Digital Humanities, Academic Libraries, and Library Publishing @DH_Collective QuasiCon 2014
  22. 22. Moving beyond narrow definitions of digital humanities as simply text analysis or digitizing physical material @DH_Collective QuasiCon 2014
  23. 23. ✪ Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities (MITH) ✪ Scholar’s Lab at UVA (established at UVA library) ✪ MATRIX at MSU ✪ Center for Digital Research in the Humanities at University of Nebraska-Lincoln (partnership between UNL libraries and College of Arts & Sciences) ✪ Princeton is in the process of building a center with library as a main sponsor @DH_Collective QuasiCon 2014
  24. 24. “...a free-floating signifier, one that increasingly serves to focus the anxiety and even outrage of individual scholars over their own lack of agency amid the turmoil in their institutions and profession.” Matthew Kirschenbaum, “What Is Digital Humanities and What’s It Doing in English Departments?” @DH_Collective QuasiCon 2014
  25. 25. Library publishing and digital humanities movements = similar origins @DH_Collective QuasiCon 2014
  26. 26. “This [focus of anxiety] is manifested in the intensity of debates around open-access publishing, where faculty members increasingly demand the right to retain ownership of their own scholarship—meaning their own labor—and disseminate it freely to an audience apart from or parallel with more traditional structures of academic publishing.” Matthew Kirschenbaum, “What Is Digital Humanities and What’s It Doing in English Departments?” @DH_Collective QuasiCon 2014
  27. 27. COMMON THREADS ✪ Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) for publishing; TEI for DH projects ✪ Twitter as peer-review; Twitter to build community ✪ DH projects as extension of digital publishing @DH_Collective QuasiCon 2014
  28. 28. @DH_Collective QuasiCon 2014
  29. 29. Michigan Publishing seeks to create innovative, sustainable structures for the broad dissemination and enduring preservation of the scholarly conversation. @DH_Collective QuasiCon 2014
  30. 30. @DH_Collective QuasiCon 2014
  31. 31. @DH_Collective QuasiCon 2014
  32. 32. @DH_Collective QuasiCon 2014
  33. 33. FUTURES @DH_Collective QuasiCon 2014
  34. 34. ✪ ACRL DH Discussion Group Interest Group ✪ dh+lib ✪ New centers and labs ✪ Permanent positions @DH_Collective ACRL QuasiCon 2014
  35. 35. “I cannot think of a successful digital humanities center — anywhere in the world — that did not begin with a bunch of people who had found each other through various means and who were committed to the bold and revolutionary project of talking to one another about their common interests. Over time, that had morphed into an even bolder and more revolutionary idea: the idea that perhaps they could work on something together.” Stephen Ramsay, “Centers Are People” @DH_Collective QuasiCon 2014
  36. 36. Will—or should—digital humanities and scholarly communication find the same home in the library? @DH_Collective QuasiCon 2014
  37. 37. What kind of expertise is needed? Collaborator or supporter? @DH_Collective QuasiCon 2014
  38. 38. Works Cited: Gold, Matthew K. 2012. Debates in the digital humanities. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press. Ramsay, Stephen. “Centers are People.” Stephen Ramsay. April 2012. http://stephenramsay. us/text/2012/04/25/centers-are-people/ ---. “The Hermeneutics of Screwing Around; or What You Do with a Million Books.” Stephen Ramsay. 17 April 2010. http://www.playingwithhistory.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/hermeneutics.pdf Sample, Mark. “On the Death of the Digital Humanities Center.” Sample Reality: Own Your Ideas. Make Them Free. 26 March 2010. http://www.samplereality.com/2010/03/26/on-the-death-of-the-digital-humanities-center/ Spiro, Lisa. “Why the Digital Humanities?” Digital Scholarship. 7 October 2011. http://digitalscholarship.files. wordpress.com/2011/10/dhglca-5.pdf Williford, Christa, and Charles Henry. “One Culture. Computationally Intensive Research in the Humanities and Social Sciences.” June 2012. @DH_Collective QuasiCon 2014
  39. 39. THANK YOU. Steven Hoelscher / Alix Keener / Setsuko Yokoyama @DH_Collective QuasiCon 2014

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