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Jansen 2011- UNECE ppt –92-97, 99, 101-106

Jansen 2011- UNECE ppt –92-97, 99, 101-106

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  • 1. Goals of interviewer training To  increase  sensi+vity  of  par+cipants  to   gender  issues; To  develop  a  basic  understanding  of  gender-­‐ based  violence,  its  characteris+cs,  causes  and   impact  on  the  health  of  women  and  children; To  understand  the  goals  of  the  study/module; To  learn  skills  for  interviewing,  taking  into   account  safety  and  ethical  guidelines; To  become  familiar  with  the  ques+onnaire  /   module  (and  protocol)  martes 5 de julio de 2011
  • 2. Example of training schedule Day  1 Sensi+za+on  to  concepts  of  gender  and  violence Presenta+ons  from  advocacy  groups/NGOs   Exposure  to  support  op+ons  for  women  living  with   violence   Aim  and  overview  of  the  study  ques+onnaire Interviewing  techniques  and  safety  measures  martes 5 de julio de 2011
  • 3. Day  2 Detailed  ques+on  by   ques+on  explana+on  of  ques+onnaire Role-­‐plays  on  approaching  the  household  and  using   the  complete  ques+onnaire,  prac+ce    how  to  respond   if  interview  interrupted  or  if  respondent  becomes   distressed  and  other  difficult  situa+onsmartes 5 de julio de 2011
  • 4. Day  3-­‐5 Sampling  procedures,   including  repeated  visits  to  reduce  non-­‐response Pilot  tes+ng  of  ques+onnaire/module  and  all  field   procedures,  including  logis+cs,  safety  measures,   supervisory  procedures,  debriefing  and  feedback   sessions Final  adjustments  to  ques+onnaire  and  field  procedures Separate  sessions  for  supervisors  on  supervisory   proceduresmartes 5 de julio de 2011
  • 5. Interviewer training Use  mul+ple  training  techniques: Group  work,  brainstorming,  presenta+ons,   discussion,  role  plays,  games,  energizers,   film,  demonstra+on,  involving  others   (‘vic+ms’,  psychologists/councellers)martes 5 de julio de 2011
  • 6. Practical recommendations Importance  of  good  planning  -­‐  pays  off  in  the  end Allow  sufficient  +me  for  training  of  field   supervisors Use  pilot  study  (field  prac+ce)  also  prac+ce  training   for  the  field  supervisors/editors  and  data  entry   staff Start  with  the  easy  area  -­‐  oVen  rural  loca+on Start  slow,  need  to  have  ongoing  training/briefings   in  par+cular  in  first  weeksmartes 5 de julio de 2011
  • 7. Lessons learned Training and fieldwork Ensure  opportuni+es  during  training  to  interview   vic+ms  of  violence Training  and  pilot  essen+al  phases  for  finalizing   ques+onnaire Imagina+ve  strategies  to  reduce  non-­‐response Privacy  is  hard  to  ensure  -­‐  share  strategies Provide  opportuni+es  (e.g.  phone  number)  for   respondents  to  check  legi+macy  of  interview Issues  around  random  selec+on  eligible  womenmartes 5 de julio de 2011
  • 8. Reducing non-response Importance  of  working  with  gate-­‐keepers  to   communi+es  such  as  health  workers Importance  of  geXng  to  eligible  women  (once   started,  most  will  finish) Will  oVen  need  to  hold  interviews  in  evening  and   weekends More  than  three  return  visits  may  be  needed,   especially  in  urban  sitesmartes 5 de julio de 2011
  • 9. Evidence of importance of training: Special training vs professional interviewers (dedicated survey, Serbia, 2003) Inexperienced, Professional, 3 week training 1 day training Response rate 93% 86% Disclosure rate 26% 21% Respondent satisfaction – with 46% 29% violence Respondent satisfaction – without 46% 38% violencemartes 5 de julio de 2011
  • 10. “...  I  hardly  could  pull  myself  together  not  to  cry.  I   wanted  to  get  out  of  the  house  as  soon  as  possible  and   cry  out  loud....  I  hardly  made  it  to  the  car;    as  soon  as  I   told  my  whole  team  they  all  burst  out  in  tears.  The  most   painful  thing  for  me  was  not  being  able  to  do  anything.   At  the  end  I  thought  that  this  very  research  is  about   hope,  and  I  have  done  my  part.”      (interviewer)martes 5 de julio de 2011
  • 11. “Maybe  I  was  media+ng  by  listening  to  her  for  half  an   hour,  and  it  was  worth  the  world  when  at  the  end  she   thanks  me  and  tells  me  she  felt  worthy.”     (interviewer)martes 5 de julio de 2011
  • 12. Research as social action For  interviewers:   a  life-­‐changing  experience,  with  many  going  on  working   on  women  issues For  respondents:   their  awareness  was  raised,  they  were  listened  to,  and   they  were  made  to  feel  worthy  martes 5 de julio de 2011
  • 13. Field work – immediately following the training!martes 5 de julio de 2011